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Remote Sensing for Volcano Systems Monitoring

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing in Geology, Geomorphology and Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 10823

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
National Research Council (CNR) - IREA, Via Diocleziano 328, Napoli, Italy
Interests: The research activity concerns the analysis of the deformative processes that characterize the evolution of volcanic and seismogenic areas, through the development of algorithms for the generation of deformation velocity maps and time series obtained with synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques and geophysical modeling with analytical and numerical inversions. Recent activity is mainly focused on the development of multi-parametric and multiphysical methodologies for the characterization of stress sources that control the short- and long-term evolution of different geodynamic contexts. The obtained results have been published in peer-reviewed ISI journals.

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Guest Editor
Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA-CNR), Via Diocleziano, 328, 80124 Naples, Italy
Interests: remote and proximal sensing; InSAR data; finite element modelling; deformation field; potential field; multiscale analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Understanding the behavior and state of volcano systems represents an efficient and robust tool to reduce the associated hazards. The use of data from volcano monitoring represents a scientifically valid basis for short-term forecasts of a future eruption. In recent decades, remote sensing techniques have furnished a fundamental contribution in the growth of knowledge of volcanic systems as well as their structural evolution. Many volcanoes are inaccessible during the climax eruption (or they are located in inaccessible regions of the Earth) and may continue to be inaccessible for a long time also after the eruptive activity. To overcome these limitations, remote sensing is now playing an important role in understanding the science underlying volcanic behavior and is consequently present in any effective hazards-mitigation program.

New research lines are often driven by technological advancements in the development of novel sensors or acquisition platforms. For this reason, processing and complete data fusion of multiparametric, proximal, and remote sensing datasets is crucial for understanding the volcanic processes, increasing the interpretative capacity of the observed volcanic phenomena.

The volume will be favorable to collect studies oriented toward the understanding of several aspects of volcano systems, from the physical characterization of a system to its eruption process, and in proposing adequate multiplatform, multifrequencies, and interdisciplinary data analysis.

Dr. Pietro Tizzani
Dr. Giuseppe Solaro
Dr. Raffaele Castaldo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Volcano monitoring systems
  • Multiplatform remote sensing
  • Geophysical methods
  • Analytical and numerical modeling
  • Integration and data fusion

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 7052 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Use of Optical Satellite Images to Detect Volcanic Impacts on Glacier Surface Morphology
by Michael Dieter Martin, Iestyn Barr, Benjamin Edwards, Matteo Spagnolo, Sanaz Vajedian and Elias Symeonakis
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(17), 3453; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173453 - 31 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3230
Abstract
Globally, about 250 Holocene volcanoes are either glacier-clad or have glaciers in close proximity. Interactions between volcanoes and glaciers are therefore common, and some of the most deadly (e.g., Nevado del Ruiz, 1985) and most costly (e.g., Eyjafjallajökull, 2010) eruptions of recent years [...] Read more.
Globally, about 250 Holocene volcanoes are either glacier-clad or have glaciers in close proximity. Interactions between volcanoes and glaciers are therefore common, and some of the most deadly (e.g., Nevado del Ruiz, 1985) and most costly (e.g., Eyjafjallajökull, 2010) eruptions of recent years were associated with glaciovolcanism. An improved understanding of volcano-glacier interactions is therefore of both global scientific and societal importance. This study investigates the potential of using optical satellite images to detect volcanic impacts on glaciers, with a view to utilise detected changes in glacier surface morphology to improve glacier-clad volcano monitoring and eruption forecasting. Roughly 1400 optical satellite images are investigated from key, well-documented eruptions around the globe during the satellite remote sensing era (i.e., 1972 to present). The most common observable volcanic impact on glacier morphology (for both thick and thin ice-masses) is the formation of ice cauldrons and openings, often associated with concentric crevassing. Other observable volcanic impacts include ice bulging and fracturing due to subglacial dome growth; localized crevassing adjacent to supraglacial lava flows; widespread glacier crevassing, presumably, due to meltwater-triggered glacier acceleration and advance. The main limitation of using optical satellite images to investigate changes in glacier morphology is the availability of cloud- and eruption-plume-free scenes of sufficient spatial- and temporal resolution. Therefore, for optimal monitoring and eruption prediction at glacier-clad volcanoes, optical satellite images are best used in combination with other sources, including SAR satellite data, aerial images, ground-based observations and satellite-derived products (e.g., DEMs). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing for Volcano Systems Monitoring)
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18 pages, 7150 KiB  
Article
Inflating Source Imaging and Stress/Strain Field Analysis at Campi Flegrei Caldera: The 2009–2013 Unrest Episode
by Raffaele Castaldo, Pietro Tizzani and Giuseppe Solaro
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(12), 2298; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13122298 - 11 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2577
Abstract
In this study, we analyze the 2009–2013 uplift phenomenon at Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera in terms of temporal and spatial variations in the stress/strain field due to the effect of an inflating source. We start by performing a 3D stationary finite element (FE) [...] Read more.
In this study, we analyze the 2009–2013 uplift phenomenon at Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera in terms of temporal and spatial variations in the stress/strain field due to the effect of an inflating source. We start by performing a 3D stationary finite element (FE) modeling of X-band COSMO-SkyMed DInSAR and GPS mean velocities to retrieve the geometry and location of the deformation source. The modeling results suggest that the best-fit source is a three-axis oblate spheroid ~3 km deep, which is mostly elongated in the NE–SW direction. Furthermore, we verify the reliability of model results by calculating the total horizontal derivative (THD) of the modeled vertical velocity component; the findings emphasize that the THD maxima overlap with the projection of source boundaries at the surface. Then, we generate a 3D time-dependent FE model, comparing the spatial and temporal distribution of the shear stress and volumetric strain with the seismic swarms beneath the caldera. We found that low values of shear stress are observed corresponding with the shallow hydrothermal system where low-magnitude earthquakes occur, whereas high values of shear stress are found at depths of about 3 km, where high-magnitude earthquakes nucleate. Finally, the volumetric strain analysis highlights that the seismicity occurs mainly at the border between compression and dilatation modeled regions, and some seismic events occur within compression regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing for Volcano Systems Monitoring)
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23 pages, 9011 KiB  
Article
Geodetic Study of the 2006–2010 Ground Deformation in La Palma (Canary Islands): Observational Results
by Joaquín Escayo, José Fernández, Juan F. Prieto, Antonio G. Camacho, Mimmo Palano, Alfredo Aparicio, Gema Rodríguez-Velasco and Eumenio Ancochea
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(16), 2566; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12162566 - 10 Aug 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4072
Abstract
La Palma is one of the youngest of the Canary Islands, and historically the most active. The recent activity and unrest in the archipelago, the moderate seismicity observed in 2017 and 2018 and the possibility of catastrophic landslides related to the Cumbre Vieja [...] Read more.
La Palma is one of the youngest of the Canary Islands, and historically the most active. The recent activity and unrest in the archipelago, the moderate seismicity observed in 2017 and 2018 and the possibility of catastrophic landslides related to the Cumbre Vieja volcano have made it strongly advisable to ensure a realistic knowledge of the background surface deformation on the island. This will then allow any anomalous deformation related to potential volcanic unrest on the island to be detected by monitoring the surface deformation. We describe here the observation results obtained during the 2006–2010 period using geodetic techniques such as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), Advanced Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (A-DInSAR) and microgravimetry. These results show that, although there are no significant associated variations in gravity, there is a clear surface deformation that is spatially and temporally variable. Our results are discussed from the point of view of the unrest and its implications for the definition of an operational geodetic monitoring system for the island. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing for Volcano Systems Monitoring)
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