Special Issue "Remote Sensing Data Sets"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Earth Observation Data".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jorge Vazquez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA
Interests: validation of remote sensing data; application of remote sensing to coastal regions; development of new remote sensing for high resolution; Validation of remote sensing data sets in challenging areas, including the Arctic and coastal regions
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, one of the critical questions in the application of remote sensing data sets is “what data set do I use?” The answer to this question can depend on many factors, including temporal resolution, spatial resolution, data uncertainty, temporal coverage and spatial coverage. These types of questions are inherent to the user community and have a commonality to the broad range of remote sensing data sets, inclusive of sea level (altimetry), sea surface winds (scatterometry), and sea surface temperature (infrared  sensors) and ocean color (visible).  Users struggle with finding, in one place, information that can allow them to make a knowledgeable decision about the data set for their application.

We are looking for  articles that address details and characteristics of remote sensing products, that could provide the user community with necessary information for making decisions on the appropriateness of products for specific applications and research problems.  Articles that address the general characteristics of the data sets and specific examples of applications are highly encouraged.  Additionally, articles that focus on data quality issues and/or uncertainties are encouraged. Comparison papers that can help users make decisions on the suitability of remote sensing data sets for their applications/research needs are highly encouraged.

Dr. Jorge Vazquez
Dr. Alexander Kokhanovsky
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Metop First Generation AVHRR FRAC SST Reanalysis Version 1
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(20), 4046; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13204046 - 10 Oct 2021
Viewed by 596
Abstract
The first full-mission global AVHRR FRAC sea surface temperature (SST) dataset with a nominal 1.1 km resolution at nadir was produced from three Metop First Generation (FG) satellites: Metop-A (2006-on), -B (2012-on) and -C (2018-on), using the NOAA Advanced Clear Sky Processor for [...] Read more.
The first full-mission global AVHRR FRAC sea surface temperature (SST) dataset with a nominal 1.1 km resolution at nadir was produced from three Metop First Generation (FG) satellites: Metop-A (2006-on), -B (2012-on) and -C (2018-on), using the NOAA Advanced Clear Sky Processor for Ocean (ACSPO) SST enterprise system. Historical reprocessing (‘Reanalysis-1’, RAN1) starts at the beginning of each mission and continues into near-real time (NRT). ACSPO generates two SST products, one with global regression (GR; highly sensitive to skin SST), and another one with piecewise regression (PWR; proxy for depth SST) algorithms. Small residual effects of orbital and sensor instabilities on SST retrievals are mitigated by retraining the regression coefficients daily, using matchups with drifting and tropical moored buoys within moving time windows. In RAN, the training windows are centered at the processed day. In NRT, the same size windows are employed but delayed in time, ending four to ten days prior to the processed day. Delayed-mode RAN reprocessing follows the NRT with a two-month lag, resulting in a higher quality and a more consistent SST record. In addition to its completeness, the newly created Metop-FG RAN1 SST dataset shows very close agreement with in situ data (including the fully independent Argo floats), well within the NOAA specifications for accuracy (global mean bias; ±0.2 K) and precision (global standard deviation; 0.6 K) in a ~20% clear-sky domain (percent of clear-sky SST pixels to the total of ice-free ocean). All performance statistics are stable in time, and consistent across the three platforms. The Metop-FG RAN1 data set is archived at the NASA JPL PO.DAAC and NOAA NCEI. This paper documents the newly created dataset and evaluates its performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Data Sets)
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Communication
A Technical Review of Planet Smallsat Data: Practical Considerations for Processing and Using PlanetScope Imagery
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(19), 3930; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13193930 - 30 Sep 2021
Viewed by 504
Abstract
With the ability to capture daily imagery of Earth at very high spatial resolutions, commercial smallsats are emerging as a key resource for the remote sensing community. Planet (Planet Labs, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA) operates the largest constellation of Earth imaging smallsats, [...] Read more.
With the ability to capture daily imagery of Earth at very high spatial resolutions, commercial smallsats are emerging as a key resource for the remote sensing community. Planet (Planet Labs, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA) operates the largest constellation of Earth imaging smallsats, which have been capturing multispectral imagery for consumer use since 2016. Use of these images is growing in the remote sensing community, but the variation in radiometric and geometric quality compared to traditional platforms (i.e., Landsat, MODIS, etc.) means the images are not always ‘analysis ready’ upon download. Neglecting these variations can impact derived products and analyses. Users also must contend with constantly evolving technology, which improves products but can create discrepancies across sensor generations. This communication provides a technical review of Planet’s PlanetScope smallsat data streams and extant literature to provide practical considerations to the remote sensing community for utilizing these images in remote sensing research. Radiometric and geometric issues for researchers to consider are highlighted alongside a review of processing completed by Planet and innovations being developed by the user community to foster the adoption and use of these images for scientific applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Data Sets)
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Article
Analysis of the Monthly and Spring-Neap Tidal Variability of Satellite Chlorophyll-a and Total Suspended Matter in a Turbid Coastal Ocean Using the DINEOF Method
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(4), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13040632 - 10 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 836
Abstract
Missing spatial data is one of the major concerns associated with the application of satellite data. The Data INterpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions (DINEOF) method has been proven to be an effective tool for filling spatial gaps in various satellite data products. The Ariake [...] Read more.
Missing spatial data is one of the major concerns associated with the application of satellite data. The Data INterpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions (DINEOF) method has been proven to be an effective tool for filling spatial gaps in various satellite data products. The Ariake Sea, which is a turbid coastal sea, shows the large spatial and temporal variability of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and total suspended matter (TSM). However, ocean color satellite data for this region usually have large gaps, which affects the accurate analysis of Chl-a and TSM variability. In this study, we applied the DINEOF method to fill the missing pixels from the regionally tuned Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua (hereafter, MODIS) Chl-a and MODIS-derived TSM datasets for the period 2002–2017. The validation results showed that the DINEOF reconstructed data were accurate and reliable. Furthermore, the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) analysis based on the reconstructed data was used to quantitatively analyze the spatial and temporal variability of Chl-a and TSM at both monthly and individual events of spring-neap tidal scales. The first three EOF modes of Chl-a showed seasonal variability mainly caused by precipitation, the sea surface temperature (SST), and river discharge for the first EOF mode and the sea level amplitude for the second. The first three EOF modes of TSM exhibited both seasonal and spring-neap tidal variability. The first and second EOF modes of TSM displayed spring-neap tidal variability caused by the sea level amplitude. The second EOF mode of TSM also showed seasonal variability caused by the sea level amplitude. In this study, we first applied the DINEOF method to reconstruct the satellite data and to capture the major spatial and temporal variability of Chl-a and TSM for the Ariake Sea. Our results demonstrate that the DINEOF method can reconstruct patchy oceanic color datasets and improve spatio-temporal variability analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Data Sets)
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Article
Validation of Satellite Sea Surface Temperatures and Long-Term Trends in Korean Coastal Regions over Past Decades (1982–2018)
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(22), 3742; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12223742 - 13 Nov 2020
Viewed by 755
Abstract
Validation of daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) data from 1982 to 2018 was performed by comparison with quality-controlled in situ water temperature data from Korea Meteorological Administration moored buoys and Korea Oceanographic Data Center observations in the coastal regions around the [...] Read more.
Validation of daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) data from 1982 to 2018 was performed by comparison with quality-controlled in situ water temperature data from Korea Meteorological Administration moored buoys and Korea Oceanographic Data Center observations in the coastal regions around the Korean Peninsula. In contrast to the relatively high accuracy of the SSTs in the open ocean, the SSTs of the coastal regions exhibited large root-mean-square errors (RMSE) ranging from 0.75 K to 1.99 K and a bias ranging from −0.51 K to 1.27 K, which tended to be amplified towards the coastal lines. The coastal SSTs in the Yellow Sea presented much higher RMSE and bias due to the appearance of cold water on the surface induced by vigorous tidal mixing over shallow bathymetry. The long-term trends of OISSTs were also compared with those of in situ water temperatures over decades. Although the trends of OISSTs deviated from those of in situ temperatures in coastal regions, the spatial patterns of the OISST trends revealed a similar structure to those of in situ temperature trends. The trends of SSTs using satellite data explained about 99% of the trends in in situ temperatures in offshore regions (>25 km from the shoreline). This study discusses the limitations and potential of global SSTs as well as long-term SST trends, especially in Korean coastal regions, considering diverse applications of satellite SSTs and increasing vulnerability to climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Data Sets)
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Technical Note
A Completeness and Complementarity Analysis of the Data Sources in the NOAA In Situ Sea Surface Temperature Quality Monitor (iQuam) System
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(18), 3741; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13183741 - 18 Sep 2021
Viewed by 383
Abstract
In situ sea surface temperatures (SST) are the key component of the calibration and validation (Cal/Val) of satellite SST retrievals and data assimilation (DA). The NOAA in situ SST Quality Monitor (iQuam) aims to collect, from various sources, all available in [...] Read more.
In situ sea surface temperatures (SST) are the key component of the calibration and validation (Cal/Val) of satellite SST retrievals and data assimilation (DA). The NOAA in situ SST Quality Monitor (iQuam) aims to collect, from various sources, all available in situ SST data, and integrate them into a maximally complete, uniform, and accurate dataset to support these applications. For each in situ data type, iQuam strives to ingest data from several independent sources, to ensure most complete coverage, at the cost of some redundancy in data feeds. The relative completeness of various inputs and their consistency and mutual complementarity are often unknown and are the focus of this study. For four platform types customarily employed in satellite Cal/Val and DA (drifting buoys, tropical moorings, ships, and Argo floats), five widely known data sets are analyzed: (1) International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS), (2) Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC), (3) Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), (4) Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS), and (5) Argo Global Data Assembly Centers (GDACs). Each data set reports SSTs from one or more platform types. It is found that drifting buoys are more fully represented in FNMOC and CMEMS. Ships are reported in FNMOC and ICOADS, which are best used in conjunction with each other, but not in CMEMS. Tropical moorings are well represented in ICOADS, FNMOC, and CMEMS. Some CMEMS mooring reports are sampled every 10 min (compared to the standard 1 h sampling in all other datasets). The CMEMS Argo profiling data set is, as expected, nearly identical with those from the two Argo GDACs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Data Sets)
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Letter
Manual-Based Improvement Method for the ASTER Global Water Body Data Base
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(20), 3373; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12203373 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 616
Abstract
A water body detection technique is an essential part of digital elevation model (DEM) generation to delineate land–water boundaries and to set flattened elevations. The initial tile-based water body data that are created during production of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection [...] Read more.
A water body detection technique is an essential part of digital elevation model (DEM) generation to delineate land–water boundaries and to set flattened elevations. The initial tile-based water body data that are created during production of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) GDEM, as a by-product, are incorporated into ASTER GDEM V3 to improve the quality. At the same time as ASTER GDEM V3, the Global Water Body Data Base (ASTWBD) Version 1 is also released to the public. The ASTWBD generation consists of two parts: separation from land area, and classification into three categories: sea, lake, and river. Sea water bodies have zero elevation. Lake water bodies have flattened elevations. River water bodies have a gradual step-down from upstream to downstream with a step of one meter. The separation process from land area is carried out automatically using an algorithm, except for sea-ice removal, to delineate the real seashore lines in the high latitude areas; almost all of the water bodies are created through this process. The classification process into three categories, i.e., sea, river, and lake, is carried out, and incorporated into ASTER GDEM V3. For inland water bodies, it is not possible to perfectly detect all water bodies using reflectance and spectral index, which are the only available parameters for optical sensors. The only way available to identify the undetected inland water bodies is to manually copy them with visual inspection from the earth’s surface images, like Landsat images. GeoCover2000 images are the main part of the object images. Color–Land ASTER MosaicS (CLAMS) images are used to cover the deficiency of the GeoCover2000 images. This kind of time-consuming, unsophisticated way is inevitable as it is a manual-based method to improve the quality of the ASTWBD. This paper describes the manual-based improvement method; specifically, how deficient water body images are efficiently copied as rasterized images from the earth’s surface images to obtain a more complete global water body data set. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Data Sets)
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