Special Issue "Advances in Remote Sensing of Coral Reefs"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Coral Reefs Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Brandon Russell
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Remote Sensing and Optical Systems Application Engineer, Labsphere, Inc. 231 Shaker St, North Sutton, NA 03062, USA
Interests: hyperspectral imaging; calibration and validation; coral reef bio-optics; animal camouflage; application of new technologies
Prof. Heidi M. Dierssen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Marine Sciences/Geography, University of Connecticut, 1080 Shennecossett Road, Groton, CT 06340, USA
Interests: hyperspectral remote sensing; sea surface optical properties; air-sea interactions; atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Remote sensing has long been acknowledged as an important tool in the study and management of coral reef ecosystems. Globally, reefs face unprecedented challenges to survival and adaptation. This includes both natural and anthropogenic stresses at local or regional scales, and the worldwide environmental pressures associated with climate change and ocean acidification. Despite these factors, phylogenetic and ecological work is revealing the diversity of coral holobiont response and resilience to environmental impacts. At the same time, advances in optical sensing technology are providing large amounts of high-quality, actionable data. Inexpensive, simple to operate aerial and underwater survey vehicles yield high-resolution spatial, temporal, and spectral data to studies of individual reefs, while small-satellite constellations are providing daily, multispectral revisit imagery on a global scale. Airborne and spaceborne sensors including the upcoming plankton, aerosol, cloud, ocean ecosystem (PACE) and hyperspectral infrared imager (HyspIRI) missions will reveal processes and patterns that have previously been unobservable.

This issue will focus on newly developed technology, techniques, and analysis to enable the next generation of coral reef remote sensing. Topics include unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles, small-satellites, hyperspectral techniques and insights, bio-optical modeling, data processing, spectral signature analyses, and advances in calibration, validation, and measurement uncertainty to enable trend detection and high-quality science. Submissions which describe application to reef surveys, management, predictive modeling, and stress–response are encouraged.

Dr. Brandon Russell
Prof. Heidi M. Dierssen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Small-SAT
  • Hyperspectral
  • Drone
  • High-resolution
  • Coral reef monitoring

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Multi-Temporal UAV Data and Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) for Estimation of Substrate Changes in a Post-Bleaching Scenario on a Maldivian Reef
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(13), 2093; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12132093 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Coral reefs are declining worldwide as a result of the effects of multiple natural and anthropogenic stressors, including regional-scale temperature-induced coral bleaching. Such events have caused significant coral mortality, leading to an evident structural collapse of reefs and shifts in associated benthic communities. [...] Read more.
Coral reefs are declining worldwide as a result of the effects of multiple natural and anthropogenic stressors, including regional-scale temperature-induced coral bleaching. Such events have caused significant coral mortality, leading to an evident structural collapse of reefs and shifts in associated benthic communities. In this scenario, reasonable mapping techniques and best practices are critical to improving data collection to describe spatial and temporal patterns of coral reefs after a significant bleaching impact. Our study employed the potential of a consumer-grade drone, coupled with structure from motion and object-based image analysis to investigate for the first time a tool to monitor changes in substrate composition and the associated deterioration in reef environments in a Maldivian shallow-water coral reef. Three key substrate types (hard coral, coral rubble and sand) were detected with high accuracy on high-resolution orthomosaics collected from four sub-areas. Multi-temporal acquisition of UAV data allowed us to compare the classified maps over time (February 2017, November 2018) and obtain evidence of the relevant deterioration in structural complexity of flat reef environments that occurred after the 2016 mass bleaching event. We believe that our proposed methodology offers a cost-effective procedure that is well suited to generate maps for the long-term monitoring of changes in substrate type and reef complexity in shallow water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Remote Sensing of Coral Reefs)
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