Special Issue "Remote Sensing of the Oceans: Blue Economy and Marine Pollution"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Andrea Buono
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PhD, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Engineering Department, Centro Direzionale Isola C4, 80143, Naples, Italy
Interests: electromagnetic modeling; SAR; polarimetry; ocean; coastal areas
Dr. Rafael Lemos Paes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PhD, Institute of Advanced Studies, Remote Sensing Department, Trevo Coronel Aviador José Alberto Albano do Amarante, 1 – Putim, 12.228-001, Sao Josè Dos Campos, Brazil
Interests: SAR; polarimetry; image processing; targets; machine learning
Dr. Yu Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PhD, Beijing University of Technology, Faculty of Information Technology, No. 100 PingLeYuan Road, Chaoyang District, 100124, Beijing, China
Interests: SAR; polarimetry; electromagnetic; image processing; machine learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of remote sensing tools to monitor the oceans is an enabling application in the fields of environment preservation and the blue economy. In fact, marine pollution due to anthropogenic activities, such as oil spills, plastic litter, and other debris, represents a dramatic threat to the marine ecosystem. In addition, there is a growing urgent need to exploit and explore new “green” sources and renewable energy, as well as a need to monitor all the critical infrastructures related to the blue economy. In this framework, a huge amount of multi-platform and multi-sensor remote sensing data is available across the scientific community that calls for the development of new methods and algorithms, as well as better assessment of state-of-art approaches. Hence, even though remote sensing tools for ocean monitoring are a well-established reality, we are still seeking for innovative methods and more accurate models.

The main goal of this Special Issue is to provide a reference framework for state-of-art remote sensing methods to observe marine pollution and to support the blue economy, as well as to promote and boost the most advanced methods and techniques in related fields. The topics of this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following subjects:

  • Target monitoring using multi-platform and multi-sensor data
  • New algorithms for marine resources exploration and exploitation
  • New algorithms for marine ecosystem preservation
  • Modeling and retrieval of geophysical ocean features
  • Oil/gas fields
  • Wind Farms
  • Aquacultures
  • Plastic litter
  • Marine debris
  • Oil spills

Dr. Andrea Buono
Dr. Rafael Lemos Paes
Dr. Yu Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ocean
  • monitoring and modeling
  • pollution
  • resource exploration
  • renewable energy
  • critical infrastructures

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Oil Spill Discrimination by Using General Compact Polarimetric SAR Features
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(3), 479; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12030479 - 03 Feb 2020
Abstract
Ocean surveillance is one of the important applications of synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Polarimetric SAR provides multi-channel information and shows great potential for monitoring ocean dynamic environments. Oil spills are a form of pollution that can seriously affect the marine ecosystem. Dual-polarimetric SAR [...] Read more.
Ocean surveillance is one of the important applications of synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Polarimetric SAR provides multi-channel information and shows great potential for monitoring ocean dynamic environments. Oil spills are a form of pollution that can seriously affect the marine ecosystem. Dual-polarimetric SAR systems are usually used for routine ocean surface monitoring. The hybrid dual-pol SAR imaging mode, known as compact polarimetry, can provide more information than the conventional dual-pol imaging modes. However, backscatter measurements of the hybrid dual-pol mode depend on the transmit wave polarization, which results in lacking consistent interpretation for various compact polarimetric (CP) images. In this study, we will explore the capability of different CP modes for oil spill detection and discrimination. Firstly, we introduce the general CP formalism method to formulate an arbitrary CP backscattered wave, such that the target scattering vector is characterized in the same framework for all CP modes. Then, a recently proposed CP decomposition method is investigated to reveal the backscattering properties of oil spills and their look-alikes. Both intensity and polarimetric features are studied to analyze the optimal CP mode for oil spill observation. Spaceborne polarimetric SAR data sets collected over natural oil slicks and experimental biogenic slicks are used to demonstrate the capability of the general CP mode for ocean surface surveillance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of the Oceans: Blue Economy and Marine Pollution)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Eddy Detection in HF Radar-Derived Surface Currents in the Gulf of Naples
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(1), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12010097 - 27 Dec 2019
Abstract
Submesoscale eddies play an important role in the energy transfer from the mesoscale down to the dissipative range, as well as in tracer transport. They carry inorganic matter, nutrients and biomass; in addition, they may act as pollutant conveyors. However, synoptic observations of [...] Read more.
Submesoscale eddies play an important role in the energy transfer from the mesoscale down to the dissipative range, as well as in tracer transport. They carry inorganic matter, nutrients and biomass; in addition, they may act as pollutant conveyors. However, synoptic observations of these features need high resolution sampling, in both time and space, making their identification challenging. Therefore, HF coastal radar were and are successfully used to accurately identify, track and describe them. In this paper we tested two already existing algorithms for the automated detection of submesoscale eddies. We applied these algorithms to HF radar velocity fields measured by a network of three radar systems operating in the Gulf of Naples. Both methods showed shortcomings, due to the high non-geostrophy of the observed currents. For this reason we developed a third, novel algorithm that proved to be able to detect highly asymmetrical eddies, often not properly identified by the previous ones. We used the results of the application of this algorithm to estimate the eddy boundary profiles and the eddy spatial distribution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of the Oceans: Blue Economy and Marine Pollution)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Size on Storm Surge in the Northern East China Sea
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(24), 3033; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11243033 - 16 Dec 2019
Abstract
Typhoon storm surge research has always been very important and worthy of attention. Less is studied about the impact of tropical cyclone size (TC size) on storm surge, especially in semi-enclosed areas such as the northern East China Sea (NECS). Observational data for [...] Read more.
Typhoon storm surge research has always been very important and worthy of attention. Less is studied about the impact of tropical cyclone size (TC size) on storm surge, especially in semi-enclosed areas such as the northern East China Sea (NECS). Observational data for Typhoon Winnie (TY9711) and Typhoon Damrey (TY1210) from satellite and tide stations, as well as simulation results from a finite-volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM), were developed to study the effect of TC size on storm surge. Using the maximum wind speed (MXW) to represent the intensity of the tropical cyclone and seven-level wind circle range (R7) to represent the size of the tropical cyclone, an ideal simulation test was conducted. The results indicate that the highest storm surge occurs when the MXW is 40–45 m/s, that storm surge does not undergo significant change with the RWM except for the area near the center of typhoon and that the peak surge values are approximately a linear function of R7. Therefore, the TC size should be considered when estimating storm surge, particularly when predicting marine-economic effects and assessing the risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of the Oceans: Blue Economy and Marine Pollution)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Vertical Migration of the Along-Slope Counter-Flow and Its Relation with the Kuroshio Intrusion off Northeastern Taiwan
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(22), 2624; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11222624 - 09 Nov 2019
Abstract
Based on satellite and analysis data and in situ observations acquired during May 23, 2017 to May 19, 2018, the spatiotemporal variations of the along-slope counter-flow off northeastern Taiwan were investigated. It was observed that the along-slope counter-flow in the subsurface layer was [...] Read more.
Based on satellite and analysis data and in situ observations acquired during May 23, 2017 to May 19, 2018, the spatiotemporal variations of the along-slope counter-flow off northeastern Taiwan were investigated. It was observed that the along-slope counter-flow in the subsurface layer was uplifted and lowered significantly during the study period. The counter-flow was significantly uplifted (lowered) while the sea surface was during an interval of positive (negative) geostrophic velocity anomaly (GVA) curl. The vertical migration of the counter-flow was also found closely linked with the Kuroshio intrusion (KI) to the northeast of Taiwan. The depths of both the upper boundary and the axis of the counter-flow were found proportional to the KI variance along the western continental slope off northeastern Taiwan. More importantly, it was established that the variation of the KI to the northeast of Taiwan had better correlation with the counter-flow than the Kuroshio derived from altimetry data. Thus, further study of the variation and mechanism of the along-slope counter-flow is needed to improve the understanding and prediction of the KI in the area of northeastern Taiwan, as well as the biochemical systems and marine economy in the East China Sea in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of the Oceans: Blue Economy and Marine Pollution)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop