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Open AccessArticle

Influence of Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Size on Storm Surge in the Northern East China Sea

by Jian Li 1,2,3,4, Yijun Hou 1,2,3,5,*, Dongxue Mo 1,2,3, Qingrong Liu 4 and Yuanzhi Zhang 6
1
Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanhai Road, 7, Qingdao 266071, China
2
Key Laboratory of Ocean Circulation and Waves, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanhai Road, 7, Qingdao 266071, China
3
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yuquan Road, 19A, Beijing 100049, China
4
North China Sea Marine Forecasting center of State Oceanic Administration, Yunling Road, 27, Qingdao 266061, China
5
Laboratory for Ocean and Climate Dynamics, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science, Qingdao 266061, China
6
Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Pukou District, Nanjing 210044, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(24), 3033; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11243033
Received: 5 November 2019 / Revised: 9 December 2019 / Accepted: 10 December 2019 / Published: 16 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of the Oceans: Blue Economy and Marine Pollution)
Typhoon storm surge research has always been very important and worthy of attention. Less is studied about the impact of tropical cyclone size (TC size) on storm surge, especially in semi-enclosed areas such as the northern East China Sea (NECS). Observational data for Typhoon Winnie (TY9711) and Typhoon Damrey (TY1210) from satellite and tide stations, as well as simulation results from a finite-volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM), were developed to study the effect of TC size on storm surge. Using the maximum wind speed (MXW) to represent the intensity of the tropical cyclone and seven-level wind circle range (R7) to represent the size of the tropical cyclone, an ideal simulation test was conducted. The results indicate that the highest storm surge occurs when the MXW is 40–45 m/s, that storm surge does not undergo significant change with the RWM except for the area near the center of typhoon and that the peak surge values are approximately a linear function of R7. Therefore, the TC size should be considered when estimating storm surge, particularly when predicting marine-economic effects and assessing the risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: storm surge; tropical cyclone size (TC size); ideal test; marine-economic effects; Northern East China Sea (NECS) storm surge; tropical cyclone size (TC size); ideal test; marine-economic effects; Northern East China Sea (NECS)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, J.; Hou, Y.; Mo, D.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, Y. Influence of Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Size on Storm Surge in the Northern East China Sea. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 3033.

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