Special Issue "Remote Observation of Volcanic Emissions and Their Impacts on the Atmosphere, Biosphere and Environment"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Pasquale Sellitto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques (LISA), Université Paris-Est Créteil (UPEC), Créteil, France
Interests: atmospheric aerosols; volcanic plumes; atmospheric radiative transfer; spectroscopy; remote sensing of the atmosphere
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Giuseppe Salerno
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Osservatorio Etneo, Catania, Italy
Interests: volcanology; eruptive mechanism and dynamics; remote observation of magmatic degassing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Letizia Spampinato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Osservatorio Etneo, Catania, Italy
Interests: volcanology; volcano eruption dynamics; thermal remote sensing
Dr. Salvatore Giammanco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Osservatorio Etneo, Catania, Italy
Interests: geochemistry; volcanology; geothermal; geostatistics
Dr. Chiara Giorio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Interests: atmospheric chemistry; analytical chemistry; environmental sciences; paleoclimate; chemometrics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Volcanic eruptions are complex time-dependent events with impacts that can extend at different spatial and temporal scales. In the last few decades, the space- and ground-based observation of volcanic phenomena has proved an essential and promising tool for investigating and monitoring volcanic systems and their impact on the atmosphere, the biosphere, and the overall environment. Reliable volcano monitoring, targeting the onset of eruptions, consists of multiparametric approaches as the mainstay of most volcano surveillance programs. Over the years, remote sensing technology advances and know-how have led to improvement of both the availability and the quality of the observations, thus allowing better recognition of precursors of eruption onset and better assessment of volcanic activity. Indeed, better assessment of the ongoing volcano phenomena has permitted an evaluation of the associated hazards and their impact on the environment and society. Volcanic plumes, once produced from crater gas and particulate emissions, can disperse in the Earth’s atmosphere and impact air quality (more than 8% of the world population lives within a 100 km radius from an active volcano), cloud formation, and radiative balance/climate at different spatial–temporal scales. Depending on the atmospheric conditions, volcanic plumes can travel from close-range to global distances, while undergoing chemical and microphysical changes. The remote observation of the dispersion/evolution of volcanic plumes is key to understanding their downwind impacts, from local-to-regional air quality degradation, which can impact the environment and the public health for populations living in the proximity of an active volcano, to regional-to-global direct and indirect climate impacts.

This Special Issue aims at presenting the state of the art of and recent advancements in volcano remote sensing, as well as multidisciplinary volcano studies coming from the exploitation of these remote sensing methodologies, with a special focus on volcanic emissions and dispersing/evolving plumes, and the impacts of volcanic pollutants on the atmosphere, the biosphere, and the environment.

We invite you to submit your manuscripts on all remote sensing techniques based on passive and active sensors, satellite and ground-based instruments, microwave, infrared, and solar spectral ranges. Synergistic approaches, including multiple coordinated techniques, are particularly welcome, as well as combinations of remote sensing techniques with in situ measurements, modeling of plume dispersion/evolution, and modeling of the impacts of volcanic emissions, including effects on human health. Both research articles and reviews will be considered for publication.

Dr. Pasquale Sellitto
Dr. Giuseppe Salerno
Dr. Letizia Spampinato
Dr. Salvatore Giammanco
Dr. Chiara Giorio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Volcanic plumes
  • Volcanic aerosols
  • Natural atmospheric pollutants
  • Air quality
  • Radiative forcing (direct and indirect effect)
  • Volcanic hazard

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Communication
Photometric Observations of Aerosol Optical Properties and Emission Flux Rates of Stromboli Volcano Plume during the PEACETIME Campaign
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(19), 4016; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13194016 - 08 Oct 2021
Viewed by 547
Abstract
The characterisation of aerosol emissions from volcanoes is a crucial step towards the assessment of their importance for regional air quality and regional-to-global climate. In this paper we present, for the first time, the characterisation of aerosol emissions of the Stromboli volcano, in [...] Read more.
The characterisation of aerosol emissions from volcanoes is a crucial step towards the assessment of their importance for regional air quality and regional-to-global climate. In this paper we present, for the first time, the characterisation of aerosol emissions of the Stromboli volcano, in terms of their optical properties and emission flux rates, carried out during the PEACETIME oceanographic campaign. Using sun-photometric observations realised during a near-ideal full plume crossing, a plume-isolated aerosol optical depth of 0.07–0.08 in the shorter-wavelength visible range, decreasing to about 0.02 in the near infrared range, was found. An Ångström exponent of 1.40 ± 0.40 was also derived. This value may suggest the dominant presence of sulphate aerosols with a minor presence of ash. During the crossing, two separate plume sections were identified, one possibly slightly affected by ash coming from a mild explosion, and the other more likely composed of pure sulphate aerosols. Exploiting the full crossing scan of the plume, an aerosol emission flux rate of 9–13 kg/s was estimated. This value was 50% larger than for typical passively degassing volcanoes, thus pointing to the importance of mild explosions for aerosol emissions in the atmosphere. Full article
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Article
Quantitative Retrieval of Volcanic Sulphate Aerosols from IASI Observations
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(9), 1808; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13091808 - 06 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 721
Abstract
We developed a new retrieval algorithm based on the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) observations, called AEROIASI-H2SO4, to measure the extinction and mass concentration of sulphate aerosols (binary solution droplets of sulphuric acid and water), with moderate random uncertainties (typically ∼35% total uncertainty [...] Read more.
We developed a new retrieval algorithm based on the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) observations, called AEROIASI-H2SO4, to measure the extinction and mass concentration of sulphate aerosols (binary solution droplets of sulphuric acid and water), with moderate random uncertainties (typically ∼35% total uncertainty for column mass concentration estimations). The algorithm is based on a self-adapting Tikhonov–Phillips regularization method. It is here tested over a moderate-intensity eruption of Mount Etna volcano (18 March 2012), Italy, and is used to characterise this event in terms of the spatial distribution of the retrieved plume. Comparisons with simultaneous and independent aerosol optical depth observations from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), SO2 plume observations from IASI and simulations with the CHIMERE chemistry/transport model show that AEROIASI-H2SO4 correctly identifies the volcanic plume horizontal morphology, thus providing crucial new information towards the study of volcanic emissions, volcanic sulphur cycle in the atmosphere, plume evolution processes, and their impacts. Insights are given on the possible spectroscopic evidence of the presence in the plume of larger-sized particles than previously reported for secondary sulphate aerosols from volcanic eruptions. Full article
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