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Special Issue "Ocean Observation Using Lidar"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2023 | Viewed by 2289

Special Issue Editors

NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23666, USA
Interests: ocean optical properties; ocean color; CALIOP/CALIPSO
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Institute of Marine Sciences (ISMAR), 00133 Rome, Italy
Interests: remote sensing; Lidar; climate change; aerosol; atmospheric water vapor cycle
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Space-based lidar instruments can provide important measurements of ocean ecosystems that both complement passive ocean color observations and address some of the limitations of this latter traditional technology. Recent studies indicate that water optical properties can be obtained from space-based lidars: the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite (NASA-CNES, launched in April 2006), the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) satellite (NASA, launched in September, 2018), the Atmospheric Laser Doppler Instrument (ALADIN) high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) onboard Atmospheric Dynamics Mission-Aeolus (ADM-Aeolus) satellite (ESA, launched in August 2018).   

This Special Issue aims to present a collection of original research articles and review papers on Lidar technologies and applications related to the characterization of water optical properties, e.g., backscattering and attenuation coefficients, particulate backscattering coefficient, chlorophyll-a concentrations, etc., and bottom characteristics, e.g., bathymetry, seafloor changes due to disasters, coral bleaching, etc. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Lidar inversions and machine learning;
  • Lidar simulators of spaceborne oceanic lidar;
  • High Spectral Resolution Lidar;
  • Multispectral and multi-angular spaceborne Lidar applications;
  • Hyperspectral fluorescence Lidar;
  • Global Ocean phytoplankton studies;
  • Bathymetry;
  • Ocean trash detection;
  • Innovative Lidar validation approaches.

Dr. Xiaomei Lu
Dr. Davide Dionisi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lidar
  • backscatter
  • ocean phytoplankton
  • bathymetry

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A New Semi-Analytical MC Model for Oceanic LIDAR Inelastic Signals
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(3), 684; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15030684 - 24 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 928
Abstract
The design and processing algorithm of oceanic LIDAR requires an effective lidar simulator. Currently, most simulation methods for lidar signal propagation in seawater use elastic scattering. In this study, a new semi-analytical Monte Carlo (MC) model for oceanic lidar inelastic signals is developed [...] Read more.
The design and processing algorithm of oceanic LIDAR requires an effective lidar simulator. Currently, most simulation methods for lidar signal propagation in seawater use elastic scattering. In this study, a new semi-analytical Monte Carlo (MC) model for oceanic lidar inelastic signals is developed to investigate chlorophyll fluorescence and Raman scattering in seawater. We also used this model to simulate the echo signal of high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) in the particulate and water molecular channels. Using this model, the effects of chlorophyll concentration, multiple scattering, receiving field of view (FOV), scattering phase function (SPF), receiver full width at half maximum (FWHM) and inhomogeneous seawater were investigated. The feasibility and effectiveness of the model were verified by the lidar equation under small and large FOVs. The results showed that chlorophyll concentration and vertical structure and multiple scattering have considerable and integrated effects on echo signals, which could provide a reference for the design of oceanic fluorescence and HSRL lidar systems and contribute to the development of processing algorithms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocean Observation Using Lidar)
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Article
Inversion of Deflection of the Vertical in the South China Sea Using ICESat-2 Sea Surface Height Data
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15010030 - 21 Dec 2022
Viewed by 896
Abstract
The traditional altimetry satellites based on pulse-limited radar altimeter only calculate along-track deflection of the vertical (DOV), which results in poorer precision of the prime vertical component than that of the meridian component and limits the precision of the marine gravity field inversion. [...] Read more.
The traditional altimetry satellites based on pulse-limited radar altimeter only calculate along-track deflection of the vertical (DOV), which results in poorer precision of the prime vertical component than that of the meridian component and limits the precision of the marine gravity field inversion. We expect an improvement in the higher precision prime vertical component using the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) sea surface height (SSH) data. In this paper, the 2′ × 2′ gridded DOVs derived from along-beam DOVs, cross-beam DOVs, and joint along-cross beam DOVs in the South China Sea (SCS; 0°–23°N, 103°–120°E) are calculated with the weighted least squares method, respectively. The inverse Vening–Meinesz (IVM) formula is applied to derive 2′ × 2′ gravity anomalies over the SCS from ICESat-2-derived gridded DOVs. In addition, the XGM2019e_2159-DOV and SIO V31.1-DOV models are used to assess the precision of the gridded DOVs. The XGM2019e_2159-GRA, SIO V31.1-GRA models, and ship-borne gravity anomalies are also adopted to evaluate the quality of gravity anomalies. The results show that the gridded DOVs calculated by the joint along-cross beam DOVs have the highest precision among the three gridded DOVs determined by ICESat-2. The precision of difference between gravity anomalies derived from the joint along-cross beam DOV and the above verification data are higher than those derived from the along-beam and cross-beam DOVs. We conclude that the joint along-cross beam DOV can effectively improve the precision of the gridded DOV, which is conducive to the inversion of a high-precision marine gravity field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocean Observation Using Lidar)
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