Special Issue "South American Hydrology and Remote Sensing (South America Water from Space)"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing in Geology, Geomorphology and Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rodrigo Abarca Del Rio
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Guest Editor
Departamento de Geofísica (DGEO), Universidad de Concepción (UDEC), Casilla: 160-C, Barrió Universitario S/N, Concepción, Chile
Interests: satellite remote sensing for hydrology; data analysis; lakes; hydroclimate
Dr. Daniel Moreira
Website
Guest Editor
Companhia De Pesquisa de Recursos Minerais (CPRM) - Geological Survey of Brazil, Department of Hydrology (DEHID), Avenida Pasteur, 404, UrcA, Rio de Janeiro (RJ), 22290-040, Brazil
Interests: geodesy; remote sensing and hydrology
Dr. Fabrice Papa
Website
Guest Editor
Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), LEGOS (Laboratoire d’Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales), Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (OMP), 14, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400, Toulouse, France
Interests: remote sensing; hydrology; water cycle; tropical climate variability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Rodrigo Paiva
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Guest Editor
Grupo Hidrologia de Grande Escala (HGE), Instituto de Pesquisas Hidráulicas –Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IPH –UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500 –Caixa Postal 15029CEP 91501-970 –Porto Alegre –RS, Brazil
Interests: hydrology; hydrodynamics; remote sensing; continental scale hydrology; modeling water systems
Dr. Marielle Gosset
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Guest Editor
Geoscience Environnement Toulouse (GET), OMP, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400, Toulouse, France
Interests: hydrometeorology; remote sensing; weather radar; hydrology; innovative sensors
Dr. Waldo Lavado
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Guest Editor
Peruvian National Service of Meteorology and Hydrology (SENAHMI), Jr. Cahuide 785 Lima 13, Peru
Interests: hydrological models; hydroclimatological data; remote sensing; landslides; water security; hydroclimatology
Dr. Jean-Francois Cretaux
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Guest Editor
CNES (Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales), CNES, 18 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400, TOULOUSE, France
Interests: satellite remote sensing for hydrology; geodesy
Dr. Oliver Saavedra
Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Investigaciones en Ingeniería Civil y Ambiental (CIICA), Universidad Privada Boliviana (UPB), Av. Víctor Ustariz Km 6.5, Campus UPB, Cochabamba, Bolivia
Interests: applied hydrology; water resource management; satellite-based precipitation; optimal dam operation; groundwater flow
Dr. Philippe Maillard
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Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Universidade federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901, Brasil
Interests: SAR image processing; satellite radar altimetry; waveform processing; water extraction from images; dry bathymetry
Dr. Daniel Vila
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Guest Editor
Divisão de Satélites e Sistemas Ambientais, Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (CPTEC/INPE), Rod Pres. Dutra km 40, Cachoeira Paulista, SP, Brasil
Interests: satellite rainfall estimation; severe weather nowcasting
Dr. Juan Leon
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Guest Editor
Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL), Carrera 32 No 12 00, Vía Candelaria, Palmira, Valle del Cauca, Colombia
Interests: spatial hydrology
Dr. Vanessa Yael Bohn
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Guest Editor
Departamento de Geografía y Turismo (DGyT)- Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS) – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), DGyT – UNS, 12 de octubre y San Juan – Bahía Blanca (8000), Pcia. Buenos Aires, Argentina
Interests: hydrological vulnerability; remote sensing; climate variability; shallow lakes
Dr. Stéphane Calmant
Website
Guest Editor
IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement), IRD center, 275 route de Montabo, Cayenne, 97300, French Guiana
Interests: Earth observation from space (geophysics, hydrology)
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Earth has a limited amount of water that recycles itself in what is called the 'water cycle'. Climate, weather, and human life and activities are profoundly affected by the variability and changes in this continuous, interconnected cycle. Therefore, observing, monitoring, and predicting the key variables governing the global and regional water cycle is essential to our understanding of the Earth’s climate, forecasting our weather, predicting floods and droughts, and improving water resource management.

The progress of Earth observation satellite technologies (EO) over the past few decades has made it possible to survey several of these variables from space. In the coming years, an increasing number of satellite missions will offer an unprecedented capacity to observe the Earth’s surface, its interior, and the atmosphere, ushering in a new era in the science of the Earth Environment and the water cycle.

It is within this perspective that we are pleased to invite you to participate in this issue. Our goal is for this issue to be the first of many, an issue regularly carried out in which all those using remote sensing technologies for monitoring waters (in all its forms) in Latin America find a receptacle.

We will welcome studies focusing on applications of remote sensing techniques to investigate water cycle studies, water management issues, liquid and solid discharge in rivers, hydrometeorological risks, precipitation, the cryosphere, soil moisture, water levels and surface waters, lakes, wetlands, rivers (including calibration/validation of current satellite missions), turbulent energy fluxes and evapotranspiration, irrigation, floods, and droughts, among others. Contributions dealing with modeling of the regional water cycle in synergy with the use of remote sensing observations will also be considered. Special contributions dealing with South American regional thematic (rivers such as the Amazon, the Orinoco, La Plata, Nordeste, Sao Francisco, Biobío, arid areas like the TPDS, etc.) are a plus, but contributions dealing with tropical large river basins, in general, are also welcome.

Studies devoted to the possibilities provided by the current South America CBERS, SAOCOM, and SABIA-MAR and results from other south American satellite missions (such as SSOT-FASAT CHARLIE), PERU-SAR1, VRSS1-2 etc ) and the European COPERNICUS space program, or to the advent of the new capabilities of the Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission (NASA, CNES, CSA, and UKSA) are most appreciated.

Dr. Rodrigo Abarca Del Rio
Dr. Daniel Moreira
Dr. Fabrice Papa
Dr. Rodrigo Paiva
Dr. Marielle Gosset
Dr. Waldo Lavado
Dr. Jean-Francois Cretaux
Dr. Oliver Saavedra
Dr. Philippe Maillard
Dr. Daniel Vila
Dr. Juan Leon
Dr. Vanessa Yael Bohn
Dr. Stephane Calmant
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • South America
  • Earth observation satellite technologies
  • Continental waters
  • Water cycle
  • Discharge
  • Hydrological models
  • Hydrometeorology
  • Climate change
  • Anthropic impact
  • Geodesy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of the Extreme Precipitation by Satellite Estimates over South America
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(13), 2085; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12132085 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
In developing countries, accurate rainfall estimation with adequate spatial distribution is limited due to sparse rain gauge networks. One way to solve this problem is the use of satellite-based precipitation products. These satellite products have significant spatial coverage of rainfall estimates and it [...] Read more.
In developing countries, accurate rainfall estimation with adequate spatial distribution is limited due to sparse rain gauge networks. One way to solve this problem is the use of satellite-based precipitation products. These satellite products have significant spatial coverage of rainfall estimates and it is of fundamental importance to investigate their performance across space–time scales and the factors that affect their uncertainties. In the open literature, some studies have already analyzed the ability of satellite-based rain estimation products to estimate average rainfall values. These investigations have found very close agreement between the estimates and observed data. However, further evaluation of the satellite precipitation products is necessary to improve their reliability to estimate extreme values. In this scenario, the main goal of this work is to evaluate the ability of satellite-based precipitation products to capture the characteristics of extreme precipitation over the tropical region of South America. The products evaluated in this investigation were 3B42 RT v7.0, 3B42 RT v7.0 uncalibrated, CMORPH V1.0 RAW, CMORPH V1.0 CRT, GSMAP-NRT-no gauge v6.0, GSMAP-NRT- gauge v6.0, CHIRP V2.0, CHIRPS V2.0, PERSIANN CDR v1 r1, CoSch and TAPEER v1.5 from Frequent Rainfall Observations on GridS (FROGS) database. Some products considered in this investigation are adjusted with rain gauge values and others only with satellite information. In this study, these two sets of products were considered. In addition, gauge-based daily precipitation data, provided by Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research, were used as reference in the analyses. In order to compare gauge-based daily precipitation and satellite-based data for extreme values, statistical techniques were used to evaluate the performance the selected satellite products over the tropical region of South America. According to the results, the threshold for rain to be considered an extreme event in South America presented high variability, ranging from 20 to 150 mm/day, depending on the region and the percentile threshold chosen for analysis. In addition, the results showed that the ability of the satellite estimates to retrieve rainfall extremes depends on the geographical location and large-scale rainfall regimes. Full article
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