Special Issue "Earthquake Ground Motion Observation and Modelling"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. José Fernando Borges
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Evora, 7000-645 Évora, Portugal
Interests: seismic source; ground motion prediction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Bento Caldeira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Evora, 7000-645 Évora, Portugal
Interests: seismic source; seismic networks
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Mourad Bezzeghoud
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Evora, 7000-645 Évora, Portugal
Interests: seismic source; seismicity; seismic networks
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. João Carvalho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Laboratory of Energy and Geology (LNEG)
Interests: active fault characterization, site effects studies, 3D geological modeling
Dr. Alexandra Carvalho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Laboratory for Civil Engineering (LNEC)
Interests: Seismic groud motion modeling, ground motion prediction, seismic hazard and seismic risck assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Earthquakes remain one of the greatest natural disasters for modern society. Therefore, realistic and robust ground motion modeling for future events is one of the most challenging problems in seismology and earthquake engineering. This topic includes the study of source effects (e.g., rupture directivity, complex source dynamics), fault characterization (slip-rate, fault length, fault throw, etc.), surface deformation studies (InSAR, PSInSAR, DInSAR), propagation ground motion phenomena (including atenuation, seismic energy channeling, scattering effects, seismic elastic and viscoelastic modeling, and inversion) due to complexity in Earth structure, and local site effects (site basin effects and 3D geological modeling, liquefaction, soil classifications, topographic effects, nonlinearity). We also solicit contributions on ground motion networks. The quantitative and reliable assessment of those phenomena requires monitoring from high-quality to low-cost dense seismic networks, as well as small to medium aperture seismic arrays and big data management and analysis.

Professor José Fernando Borges
Professor Bento Caldeira
Professor Mourad Bezzeghoud
Dr. João Carvalho
Dr. Alexandra Carvalho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ground motion modeling
  • Seismic source and path effects
  • Near surface structure
  • Site effect
  • Ground motion prediction equations (GMPE)
  • Vs30
  • Soil classification
  • Seismic viscoelastic modeling and inversion
  • Seismic strong motion networks

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
Destructive M6.2 Petrinja Earthquake (Croatia) in 2020—Preliminary Multidisciplinary Research
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(6), 1095; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13061095 - 13 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2703
Abstract
On 28 December 2020, seismic activity in the wider Petrinja area strongly intensified after a period of relative seismological quiescence that had lasted more than 100 years (since the well-known M5.8 Kupa Valley earthquake of 1909, which is known based on the discovery [...] Read more.
On 28 December 2020, seismic activity in the wider Petrinja area strongly intensified after a period of relative seismological quiescence that had lasted more than 100 years (since the well-known M5.8 Kupa Valley earthquake of 1909, which is known based on the discovery of the Mohorovičić discontinuity). The day after the M5 foreshock, a destructive M6.2 mainshock occurred. Outcomes of preliminary seismological, geological and SAR image analyses indicate that the foreshocks, mainshock and aftershocks were generated due to the (re)activation of a complex fault system—the intersection of longitudinal NW–SE right-lateral and transverse NE–SW left-lateral faults along the transitional contact zone of the Dinarides and the Pannonian Basin. According to a survey of damage to buildings, approximately 15% of buildings were very heavily damaged or collapsed. Buildings of special or outstanding historical or cultural heritage significance mostly collapsed or became unserviceable. A preliminary analysis of the earthquake ground motion showed that in the epicentral area, the estimated peak ground acceleration PGA values for the bedrock ranged from 0.29 to 0.44 g. In the close Petrinja epicentral area that is characterized by the superficial deposits, significant ground failures were reported within local site effects. Based on that finding and building damage, we assume that the resulting peak ground acceleration (PGAsite) values were likely between 0.4 and 0.6 g depending on the local site characteristics and the distance from the epicentre. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Earthquake Ground Motion Observation and Modelling)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Imaging of the Upper Mantle Beneath Southeast Asia: Constrained by Teleseismic P-Wave Tomography
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(18), 2975; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12182975 - 13 Sep 2020
Viewed by 890
Abstract
It is of great significance to construct a three-dimensional underground velocity model for the study of geodynamics and tectonic evolution. Southeast Asia has attracted much attention due to its complex structural features. In this paper, we collected relative travel time residuals data for [...] Read more.
It is of great significance to construct a three-dimensional underground velocity model for the study of geodynamics and tectonic evolution. Southeast Asia has attracted much attention due to its complex structural features. In this paper, we collected relative travel time residuals data for 394 stations distributed in Southeast Asia from 2006 to 2019, and 14,011 seismic events were obtained. Then, teleseismic tomography was applied by using relative travel time residuals data to invert the velocity where the fast marching method (FMM) and subspace method were used for every iteration. A novel 3D P-wave velocity model beneath Southeast Asia down to 720 km was obtained using this approach. The tomographic results suggest that the southeastern Tibetan Plateau, the Philippines, Sumatra, and Java, and the deep part of Borneo exhibit high velocity anomalies, while low velocity anomalies were found in the deep part of the South China Sea (SCS) basin and in the shallow part of Borneo and areas near the subduction zone. High velocity anomalies can be correlated to subduction plates and stable land masses, while low velocity anomalies can be correlated to island arcs and upwelling of mantle material caused by subduction plates. We found a southward subducting high velocity body in the Nansha Trough, which was presumed to be a remnant of the subduction of the Dangerous Grounds into Borneo. It is further inferred that the Nansha Trough and the Dangerous Grounds belong to the same tectonic unit. According to the tomographic images, a high velocity body is located in the deep underground of Indochina–Natuna Island–Borneo–Palawan, depth range from 240 km to 660 km. The location of the high velocity body is consistent with the distribution range of the ophiolite belt, so we speculate that the high velocity body is the remnant of thee Proto-South China Sea (PSCS) and Paleo-Tethys. This paper conjectures that the PSCS was the southern branch of Paleo-Tethys and the gateway between Paleo-Tethys and the Paleo-Pacific Ocean. Due to the squeeze of the Australian plate, PSCS closed from west to east in a scissor style, and was eventually extinct under Borneo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Earthquake Ground Motion Observation and Modelling)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessTechnical Note
Co-Seismic Inversion and Post-Seismic Deformation Mechanism Analysis of 2019 California Earthquake
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(4), 608; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13040608 - 08 Feb 2021
Viewed by 638
Abstract
In July 2019, a series of seismic events, including a magnitude (Mw) 7.1 mainshock and Mw 6.4 foreshock, occurred in Eastern California. Studying these seismic events can significantly improve our understanding of the Eastern California tectonic environment. Sentinel-1A and ALOS-2 PALSAR images were [...] Read more.
In July 2019, a series of seismic events, including a magnitude (Mw) 7.1 mainshock and Mw 6.4 foreshock, occurred in Eastern California. Studying these seismic events can significantly improve our understanding of the Eastern California tectonic environment. Sentinel-1A and ALOS-2 PALSAR images were utilized to obtain co-seismic deformation fields, including mainshock and foreshock deformation. The Okada elastic dislocation model and ascending and descending orbit results were used to invert the co-seismic slip distribution and obtain a co-seismic focal mechanism solution. Using ascending Sentinel-1A images, a time-series deformation was obtained for 402 d after the earthquake, and the deformation evolution mechanism was analyzed. The maximum uplift caused by the co-seismic mechanism reached 1.5 m in the line of sight (LOS), and the maximum subsidence reached 1 m in the LOS. For 402 d after the earthquake, the area remained active, and its deformation was dominated by after-slip. The co-seismic inversion results illustrated that California earthquakes were mainly strike-slip. The co-seismic inversion magnitude was approximately Mw 7.08. The Coulomb stress change illustrated that the seismic moment caused by the co-seismic slip was 4.24 × 1026 N × m, which is approximately Mw 7.06. This finding is consistent with the co-seismic slip distribution inversion results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Earthquake Ground Motion Observation and Modelling)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop