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Special Issue "2nd Edition Advances in Remote Sensing for Archaeological Heritage"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Christopher Brooke

Department of History, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0)1636 812607
Interests: archaeological ground-based remote sensing; image processing; mathematical modelling; medieval history
Guest Editor
Dr. Louise Rayne

School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, University Road, LE1 7RH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0)116 229 7370
Interests: landscape archaeology; water management history; human–environment interactions; application of remote sensing and GIS to archaeology
Guest Editor
Prof. Danny Donoghue

Department of Geography, University of Durham, Lower Mountjoy, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0) 191 33 41867
Interests: airborne and satellite remote sensing; applications of remote sensing for archaeology and coastal change; computer aided learning techniques; geographical information systems for environmental modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue assesses the status of remote sensing applications in archaeology and explores how their use could have a more significant impact on archaeological research and cultural heritage protection in the future. It is organized in conjunction with the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society (RSPSoc) Archaeology Special Interest Group. Remote sensing and GIS have rapidly been adopted by archaeologists for several key reasons: Fast mapping of entire landscapes, analysis of large datasets, and a way of recording features in areas rendered inaccessible, for example in areas affected by current conflict, by land-use change, and in built heritage. In recent years many image interpretation-based studies, classifications and automated detection projects (and thermal imaging, photogrammetry, LiDAR, Synthetic Aperture Radar, and the relatively low-cost/open source and user-friendly structure-from-motion software packages have been applied to cultural heritage protection as well as recording and analysis. Applications have also sought to demonstrate the use of remote sensing for specific regions, sites, buildings and even objects. The value of many of the products of these analyses needs to be established more robustly, however, reflecting on the need for them to enhance our understanding of past landscapes rather than primarily acting as aesthetically-pleasing visualizations. While many archaeological projects rely exclusively on trained expertise in remote sensing, others are also making use of citizen scientists to build larger datasets. This issue will present a number of relevant remote sensing tools and case studies across a wide temporal and spatial range and assess the impact of an increasingly open-source research environment; it will also promote a discussion of how the impact of remote sensing and GIS techniques in archaeology and cultural heritage can be increased.

Dr. Christopher Brooke
Dr. Louise Rayne
Prof. Danny Donoghue
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Remote sensing archaeology
  • ‘Structure from Motion’ Photogrammetry
  • Cloud Computing and Parallel Processing
  • SAR, Lidar, GIS
  • Multispectral Imaging, Hyperspectral Imaging
  • Thermography, Thermal Imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Multispectral Contrast of Archaeological Features: A Quantitative Evaluation
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(8), 913; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11080913
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 25 March 2019 / Accepted: 8 April 2019 / Published: 15 April 2019
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Abstract
This study provides an evaluation of spectral responses of hollow ways in Upper Mesopotamia. Hollow ways were used for the transportation of animals, carts, and other moving agents for centuries. The aim is to show how the success of spectral indices varies in [...] Read more.
This study provides an evaluation of spectral responses of hollow ways in Upper Mesopotamia. Hollow ways were used for the transportation of animals, carts, and other moving agents for centuries. The aim is to show how the success of spectral indices varies in describing topologically simple features even in a seemingly homogeneous geographic unit. The variation is further highlighted under the changing precipitation regime. The methodology begins with an exploration of the relationship between the date of a multispectral scene and the visibility of hollow ways. The next step is to evaluate the impact of rainfall levels on numerous indices and to quantify spectral contrast. The contrast between a hollow way and its background is evaluated with Welch’s t-test and the association between precipitation regime and spectral responses of hollow ways are investigated with Correspondence Analysis and Fisher’s test. Results highlight an intrinsic relationship between the precipitation regime and the ways in which archaeological features reflects and/or emits electromagnetic energy. Next, the categorization of spectral indices based on different rainfall levels can be used as a guidance in future studies. Finally, the study suggests contrast becomes an even more fruitful concept as one moves from the spatial domain to the spectral domain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition Advances in Remote Sensing for Archaeological Heritage)
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Open AccessArticle
A Remote Sensing Approach for Mapping the Development of Ancient Water Management in the Near East
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(12), 2042; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10122042
Received: 14 November 2018 / Revised: 7 December 2018 / Accepted: 10 December 2018 / Published: 14 December 2018
PDF Full-text (7497 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We present a novel approach that uses remote sensing to record and reconstruct traces of ancient water management throughout the whole region of Northern Mesopotamia, an area where modern agriculture and warfare has had a severe impact on the survival of archaeological remains [...] Read more.
We present a novel approach that uses remote sensing to record and reconstruct traces of ancient water management throughout the whole region of Northern Mesopotamia, an area where modern agriculture and warfare has had a severe impact on the survival of archaeological remains and their visibility in modern satellite imagery. However, analysis and interpretation of declassified stereoscopic spy satellite data from the 1960s and early 1970s revealed traces of ancient water management systems. We processed satellite imagery to facilitate image interpretation and used photogrammetry to reconstruct hydraulic pathways. Our results represent the first comprehensive map of water management features across the entirety of Northern Mesopotamia for the period ca. 1200 BC to AD 1500. In particular, this shows that irrigation was widespread throughout the region in the Early Islamic period, including within the zone traditionally regarded as “rain-fed”. However, we found that a high proportion of the ancient canal systems had been damaged or destroyed by 20th century changes to agricultural practices and land use. Given this, there is an urgent need to record these rapidly vanishing water management systems that were an integral part of the ancient agricultural landscape and that underpinned powerful states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition Advances in Remote Sensing for Archaeological Heritage)
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Graphical abstract

Remote Sens. EISSN 2072-4292 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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