Special Issue "Speleothem Records and Climate"

A special issue of Quaternary (ISSN 2571-550X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Sandy P. Harrison

Associate Editor
School of Archaeology, Geography & Environmental Sciences, Reading University, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6AH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: palaeoclimate dynamics; palaeoclimate reconstruction; land–atmosphere interaction; biogeochemical cycles
Guest Editor
Dr. Laia Comas Bru

School of Archaeology, Geography & Environmental Sciences, Reading University, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6AH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: palaeoclimate dynamics; oxygen isotopes; speleothems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Given their extremely high temporal resolution and the excellent opportunities for dating, speleothem records provide a unique opportunity for assessing climate change on various spatial and temporal scales, over the last 21,000 years and beyond. The different measurements made on speleothems, including the stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon (δ18O, δ13C) and various trace elements, are widely used to reconstruct local changes in the hydrological cycle and changes in atmospheric composition. Furthermore, regional syntheses of speleothem data provide an opportunity to reconstruct changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. Such syntheses open up the possibility of using speleothem records to evaluate state-of-the-art climate models that explicitly simulate water and carbon isotopes and/or atmospheric tracers such as dust. Several of the modelling groups involved in palaeoclimate simulations during the current phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6/PMIP4) are using with isotope- and tracer-enabled model versions, and, thus, it is timely to assess the state of data availability and our understanding of these records.

The SISAL Working Group of the Past Global Changes project (PAGES; http://pastglobalchanges.org/ini/wg/sisal/intro) invites contributions from the community documenting speleothem records and their interpretation for key regions of the world, particularly contributions drawing on the SISAL database.  We also invite methodological contributions, including innovative approaches to dating, interpretation, climate reconstruction, and data-model comparison.

Prof. Sandy P. Harrison
Dr. Laia Comas Bru
Guest Editors

 

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Quaternary is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Speleothem
  • δ18O
  • δ13C
  • palaeoclimate reconstruction
  • regional climate dynamics
  • isotope modelling
  • CMIP6/PMIP4

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview The Potential of Speleothems from Western Europe as Recorders of Regional Climate: A Critical Assessment of the SISAL Database
Quaternary 2018, 1(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/quat1030030 (registering DOI)
Received: 31 August 2018 / Revised: 27 November 2018 / Accepted: 30 November 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
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Abstract
Western Europe is the region with the highest density of published speleothem δ18O (δ18Ospel) records worldwide. Here, we review these records in light of the recent publication of the Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and AnaLysis (SISAL) database. We
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Western Europe is the region with the highest density of published speleothem δ18O (δ18Ospel) records worldwide. Here, we review these records in light of the recent publication of the Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and AnaLysis (SISAL) database. We investigate how representative the spatial and temporal distribution of the available records is for climate in Western Europe and review potential sites and strategies for future studies. We show that spatial trends in precipitation δ18O are mirrored in the speleothems, providing means to better constrain the factors influencing δ18Ospel at a specific location. Coherent regional δ18Ospel trends are found over stadial-interstadial transitions of the last glacial, especially in high altitude Alpine records, where this has been attributed to a strong temperature control of δ18Ospel. During the Holocene, regional trends are less clearly expressed, due to lower signal-to-noise ratios in δ18Ospel, but can potentially be extracted with the use of statistical methods. This first assessment highlights the potential of the European region for speleothem palaeoclimate reconstruction, while underpinning the importance of knowing local factors for a correct interpretation of δ18Ospel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Speleothem Records and Climate)
Open AccessReview The Indian Summer Monsoon from a Speleothem δ18O Perspective—A Review
Quaternary 2018, 1(3), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/quat1030029 (registering DOI)
Received: 19 September 2018 / Revised: 30 November 2018 / Accepted: 30 November 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
PDF Full-text (905 KB) | Supplementary Files
Abstract
As one of the most prominent seasonally recurring atmospheric circulation patterns, the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) plays a vital role for the life and livelihood of about one-third of the global population. Changes in the strength and seasonality of the ASM significantly affect
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As one of the most prominent seasonally recurring atmospheric circulation patterns, the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) plays a vital role for the life and livelihood of about one-third of the global population. Changes in the strength and seasonality of the ASM significantly affect the ASM region, yet the drivers of change and the varied regional responses of the ASM are not well understood. In the last two decades, there were a number of studies reconstructing the ASM using stalagmite-based proxies such as oxygen isotopes (δ18O). Such reconstructions allow examination of ASM drivers and responses, increasing monsoon predictability. In this review paper, we focus on stalagmite δ18O records from India at the proximal end of the ASM region. Indian stalagmite δ18O records show well-dated, high-amplitude changes in response to the dominant drivers of the ASM on orbital to multi-centennial timescales, and indicate the magnitude of monsoon variability in response to these drivers. We examine Indian stalagmite records collated in the Speleothem Isotope Synthesis and AnaLysis version 1 (SISAL_v1) database (http://researchdata.reading.ac.uk/139/) and support the database with a summary of record quality and regional climatic interpretations of the δ18O record during different climate states. We highlight current debates and suggest the most useful time periods (climatic events) and locations for further work using tools such as data-model comparisons, spectral analysis methods, multi-proxy investigations, and monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Speleothem Records and Climate)
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