Special Issue "Advances of Biogas and Biofuel Production"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Borja Velázquez-Martí
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Departamento de Ingeniería Rural y Agroalimentaria, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: biomass; bioenergy; agricultural mechanization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Anaerobic digestion has proven to be a key process in any sustainable technological strategy applied to organic waste management, transforming organic matter to valuable intermediates, which can be recovered, and finally to biogas, which can be used for the production of heat and electricity or upgraded to biomethane. This process has been known for hundreds of years; however, it is still the subject of research, currently focused on four aspects:

  • Analysis of fermentability of new raw materials, individually or in co-digestion;
  • Evaluation of new inoculums, and analysis of the interaction between raw materials and inoculum, along with nutritional requirements;
  • Studies of thermal sequences the processes, alternating between thermophilic and mesophilic stages, evaluating productivity, kinetics, and net energy balance;
  • Kinetic models of the process;
  • Microbiological identification involved in fermentation according to the substrate and thermal process followed;
  • Raw material pretreatments to improve the efficiency of the digestive process;
  • Biogas purification;
  • Biogas applications;
  • Integration of biogas in the diversified and decentralized energy matrix.

Biofuels combined with electricity have assumed such an important role that they are increasingly seen as a potential solution to the transport problems. The production and use of biofuels in a sustainable way is still a challenge, regardless of the evident research efforts and political objectives. This is a complex multidisciplinary problem that encloses issues such as

  • Raw materials and pretreatments;
  • Process;
  • Catalysis;
  • Purification process;
  • By-products;
  • Applications.

We invite submissions to a Special Issue of the journal Processes on the topic of state-of-the-art biogas and biofuels; processes; future perspectives; and challenges.

Prof. Borja Velázquez-Martí
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biodiesel
  • bioethanol
  • fermentation
  • codigestion
  • inoculum
  • pretreatments
  • kinetics models
  • biofuels applications
  • energy matrix

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Enhancement of Biomass and Lipid Productivities of Scenedesmus sp. Cultivated in the Wastewater of the Dairy Industry
Processes 2020, 8(11), 1458; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8111458 - 14 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 672
Abstract
Microalgae are photoautotrophic microorganisms capable of producing compounds with potential bioenergetic applications as an alternative energy source due to the imminent exhaustion of fossil fuels, their impact on the environment, and the constant population increase. The mass cultivation of these microorganisms requires high [...] Read more.
Microalgae are photoautotrophic microorganisms capable of producing compounds with potential bioenergetic applications as an alternative energy source due to the imminent exhaustion of fossil fuels, their impact on the environment, and the constant population increase. The mass cultivation of these microorganisms requires high concentrations of nutrients, which is not profitable if analytical grade culture media are used. A viable alternative is the use of agro-industrial wastewater, due to the metabolic flexibility of these microorganisms and their ability to take advantage of the nutrients present in these substrates. For the reasons mentioned above, the effect of the cultivation in wastewater from cheese processing on the growth parameters and biomass composition of Scenedesmus sp. was evaluated, and its nutrient removal capacity determined. A high lipid concentration was obtained in the cultures with the dairy effluent (507.81 ± 19.09 mg g−1) compared to the standard culture medium, while the growth parameters remained similar to the control medium. Scenedesmus sp. achieved high percentages of nutrient assimilation of the wastewater used (88.41% and 97.07% for nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively). With the results obtained, the feasibility of cultivating microalgae in agro-industrial wastewater as an alternative culture medium that induces the accumulation of compounds with potential bioenergetic applications was verified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances of Biogas and Biofuel Production)
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Article
Cyanobacterial Biomass Produced in the Wastewater of the Dairy Industry and Its Evaluation in Anaerobic Co-Digestion with Cattle Manure for Enhanced Methane Production
Processes 2020, 8(10), 1290; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8101290 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 621
Abstract
The unique perspective that microalgae biomass presents for bioenergy production is currently being strongly considered. This type of biomass production involves large amounts of nutrients, due to nitrogen and phosphorous fertilizers, which impose production limitations. A viable alternative to fertilizers is wastewater, rich [...] Read more.
The unique perspective that microalgae biomass presents for bioenergy production is currently being strongly considered. This type of biomass production involves large amounts of nutrients, due to nitrogen and phosphorous fertilizers, which impose production limitations. A viable alternative to fertilizers is wastewater, rich in essential nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium). Therefore, Arthrospira platensis was cultivated in 150 mL photobioreactors with 70% (v/v) with the wastewater from a dairy industry, under a regime of light:dark cycles (12 h:12 h), with an irradiance of 140 μmol m−2 s−1 photon. The discontinuous cultures were inoculated with an average concentration of chlorophyll-a of 13.19 ± 0.19 mg L−1. High biomass productivity was achieved in the cultures with wastewater from the dairy industry (1.1 ± 0.02 g L−1 d−1). This biomass was subjected to thermal and physical treatments, to be used in co-digestion with cattle manure. Co-digestion was carried out in a mesophilic regime (35 °C) with a C: N ratio of 19:1, reaching a high methane yield of 482.54 ± 8.27 mL of CH4 g−1 volatile solids (VS), compared with control (cattle manure). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the use of cyanobacterial biomass grown in wastewater to obtain bioenergy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances of Biogas and Biofuel Production)
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Article
Influence of Granular Activated Carbon on Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Sugar Beet Pulp and Distillers Grains with Solubles
Processes 2020, 8(10), 1226; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8101226 - 01 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 547
Abstract
Anaerobic digestion is an important technology to receive energy from various types of biomass. In this work, the impact of granular activated carbon (GAC) on the mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of sugar beet pulp and distillers grains was investigated. After a short period, anaerobic [...] Read more.
Anaerobic digestion is an important technology to receive energy from various types of biomass. In this work, the impact of granular activated carbon (GAC) on the mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of sugar beet pulp and distillers grains was investigated. After a short period, anaerobic reactors began to produce biomethane and were ready for completion within 19–24 days. The addition of GAC to reactors (5–10 g L−1) significantly enhanced the methane production rate and consumption of produced volatile fatty acids. Thus, the maximum methane production rate increased by 13.7% in the presence of GAC (5 g L−1). Bacterial and archaeal community structure and dynamics were investigated, based on 16S rRNA genes analysis. The abundant classes of bacteria in GAC-free and GAC-containing reactors were Clostridia, Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, and Synergistia. Methanogenic communities were mainly represented by the genera Methanosarcina, Methanoculleus, Methanothrix, and Methanomassiliicoccus in GAC-free and GAC-containing reactors. Our results indicate that the addition of granular activated carbon at appropriate dosages has a positive effect on anaerobic co-digestion of by-products of the processing of sugar beet and ethanol distillation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances of Biogas and Biofuel Production)
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