Reservoir Characterization and Modeling in Hydrocarbon Exploration and Development

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 July 2024 | Viewed by 2141

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Petroleum Geosciences and Remote Sensing Program, Department of Applied Physics and Astronomy, College of Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah 27272, United Arab Emirates
Interests: integrated petroleum geoscience; reservoir characterization; 3D static reservoir modeling; 2D/3D qualitative and quantitative seismic interpretation; well logging analysis; petroleum system analysis; source rock evaluation; basin analysis; sequence stratigraphy; seismic stratigraphy; conventional and unconventional reservoirs (carbonate shale oil and gas)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am excited to share with you information about a Special Issue on “Reservoir Characterization and Modeling in Hydrocarbon Exploration and Development”. This Special Issue aims to provide a platform for researchers and industry professionals to exchange knowledge and expertise in the area of reservoir characterization and modeling.

Reservoir characterization and modeling is a crucial step in the hydrocarbon exploration and development process. It involves the acquisition, integration, and analysis of various types of data to build a comprehensive understanding of a reservoir and its properties. Accurate reservoir characterization and modeling can lead to improved reservoir performance, and ultimately, better economic outcomes.

This Special Issue welcomes original research articles, review articles, and case studies related to reservoir characterization and modeling. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Geological modeling;
  • Geophysical characterization;
  • Petrophysical properties and analysis;
  • Reservoir simulation and modeling;
  • Uncertainty and risk analysis;
  • Enhanced oil recovery methods.

I encourage you to submit your work to this Special Issue and contribute to the advancement of the field. The deadline for submissions is 21 July 2024, and all submissions will undergo a rigorous peer-review process. Thank you for your attention, and I look forward to your contributions.

Dr. Mohamed I. Abdel-Fattah
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • geological modeling
  • geophysical characterization
  • petrophysical properties and analysis
  • reservoir simulation and modeling
  • uncertainty and risk analysis
  • enhanced oil recovery method

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 14390 KiB  
Article
Simulation Analysis of the Characteristics of Layered Cores during Pulse Decay Tests
by Haobo Chen, Yongqian Liu, Pengda Cheng, Xinguang Zhu and Guofeng Han
Processes 2024, 12(1), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr12010146 - 7 Jan 2024
Viewed by 651
Abstract
The permeability of low-permeability cores is generally measured using a pulse decay method. The core of low-permeability rocks, such as shale, often has a layered structure. The applicability of pulse decay testing for layered cores is not clear. In this study, the performance [...] Read more.
The permeability of low-permeability cores is generally measured using a pulse decay method. The core of low-permeability rocks, such as shale, often has a layered structure. The applicability of pulse decay testing for layered cores is not clear. In this study, the performance of the pulse decay method on layered cores was comprehensively investigated. Numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of the interlayer permeability ratio, storativity ratio, layer thickness, interlayer location, and number of layers on the pulse decay pressure and pressure derivative curves, as well as the permeability obtained from pulse decay testing. The results revealed that the pressure curves of layered cores exhibit distinct differences from those of homogeneous cores if the upstream permeability is larger than the downstream one. The pressure derivative curve shows more inclined or horizontal straight-line segments than in the homogeneous case. The shapes of the pressure and pressure derivative curves are affected by the upstream and downstream positions of the core, but the tested permeability is not affected. The tested permeability differs from the equivalent model permeability, with an error of up to 22%. If the number of layers is not less than 10, the permeability obtained from the pulse decay test is consistent with that of the equivalent model. These differences are influenced by the interlayer permeability ratio, storativity ratio, layer thickness, interlayer location, and number of layers. To improve the accuracy of permeability analysis in pulse decay testing for layered cores, curve fitting using the characteristics of the pressure derivative curve can be employed. Full article
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19 pages, 11280 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation of Pore Pressure Change Caused by Hydrocarbon Generation in Chezhen Sag and Its Influence on Hydrocarbon Accumulation
by Mingwen Wang, Gang Luo, Feng Qin, Zonghu Liao, Shuhong Zhou and Nianfa Yang
Processes 2023, 11(7), 1976; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11071976 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 880
Abstract
The pore fluid pressure is important for the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons. The Chezhen Sag region in the Bohai Bay Basin is typically characterized by pore fluid overpressure, which is the difference between the pore fluid pressure and the hydrostatic pore [...] Read more.
The pore fluid pressure is important for the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons. The Chezhen Sag region in the Bohai Bay Basin is typically characterized by pore fluid overpressure, which is the difference between the pore fluid pressure and the hydrostatic pore pressure. The formation mechanisms of pore overpressure and the accumulation regularity of the “upper source-lower reservoir” type in this region remain unknown. In order to investigate these problems, based on the existing seismic, logging data, and regional tectonic stress environment, we established a two-dimensional finite element model to simulate the fluid–solid coupling processes in the Chegu 25 block of the Chezhen depression. We calculated the abnormal overpressure generated at the source rock during hydrocarbon generation and the processes of hydrocarbon migration and accumulation along the faults and analyzed the dynamic conditions of the hydrocarbon downward accumulation. The results showed that overpressure could accelerate the migration of hydrocarbon and improve the efficiency of hydrocarbon accumulation. When the overpressure was too large, tensile fractures and shear fractures could occur, resulting in hydrocarbon dissipation, and changing the results of the oil and gas accumulation. The overpressure at the source rock was mainly caused by hydrocarbon generation, while the overpressure at the reservoir was primarily created by unbalanced compaction. As the dominant channel of hydrocarbon migration that exists, overpressure will change the direction and path of hydrocarbon migration in the fault. Therefore, the high permeability of the fault and the existence of pore fluid overpressure can explain the “upper source-lower reservoir” hydrocarbon accumulation model strongly explained the high permeability of faults and the presence of overpressure. The simulated overpressure results were also in good agreement with the mud weight equivalent overpressure and the drill stem tests (DSTs). Full article
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