Special Issue "Elastomers: From Theory to Applications"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gert Heinrich
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., 01069 Dresden, Hohe Straße 6, Germany
2. Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Textilmaschinen und Textile Hochleistungswerkstofftechnik, 01069 Dresden, Hohe Straße 6, Germany
Interests: polymer nanocomposites; friction and adhesion of polymer systems, wear; fracture mechanical characterization and modelling of crack formation and propagation in elastomers; statistical-mechanics of polymer networks, material laws, engineering applications; rubber elasticity and viscoelasticity of filled polymer networks; filler-polymer and filler-filler interactions in elastomers: modelling, testing, engineering applications; tire physics, mechanics and engineering (e.g. traction and braking, road-tire interactions), advanced tire materials compounding and testing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Michael Lang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., 01069 Dresden, Hohe Straße 6, Germany
Interests: theory and modeling of polymer networks; rubber elasticity, cyclic polymers; grafted polymers; polymer melts and solutions; nanostructured networks and gels

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on the current state-of-the-art of elastomers, both in modern applications and from a theoretical perspective. The main characteristic of elastomer materials is the high elongation and (entropy) elasticity of these materials, and the ability to swell multiple times in a suitable solvent. The use of filled elastomers, especially of new kinds of elastomer nanocomposites, is of high interest for rubber technologies. Nanostructured adaptable gels allow tailoring of responsive materials or filtering systems. These materials enable widespread applications in engineering fields, ranging from modern tire technologies to medical applications and consumer goods. Elastomers also find utility in a range of biomaterial applications. Bioelastomers are widely available in nature, and have been shown to have specific properties often far superior to their synthetic counterparts. All elastomers share typical features, such as entropy-driven elasticity, the presence of entanglements, and topological constraints of network chain conformations. These features still offer fascinating scientific challenges in synthesis, characterization, and application, as well as for the theory of polymer networks and the modeling of elastomeric solids.

Papers are sought that discuss the latest research in the area or summarize selected areas in the field. The scope of the Special Issue encompasses frontier-of-science contributions in synthesis, characterization, modeling, and the theory of elastomers. Of particular interest are new structures and functionalities incorporated into elastomers, leading to enhanced properties of crosslinked elastomeric materials. Examples include conductive elastomers, mechanically adaptive elastomers, bioelastomers, photosensitive and light-controlled elastomers, elastomers with autonomous self-healing properties, and other novel elastomer-based materials.

Prof. Dr. Gert Heinrich
Dr. Michael Lang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • elastomer nanocomposites
  • conductive elastomers
  • bioelastomers
  • light-controllable elastomers
  • elastomers with self-healing properties
  • smart and adaptive elastomers
  • elastomers for future tire technologies
  • advanced modeling and simulation of elastomers
  • cutting-edge characterization of elastomers
  • theory of rubber elasticity
  • elastomers with novel network structure
  • nanostructured amphiphilic gels

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Cationic Copolymerization of Isobutylene with 4-Vinylbenzenecyclobutylene: Characteristics and Mechanisms
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 201; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010201 - 13 Jan 2020
Abstract
A random copolymer of isobutylene (IB) and 4-vinylbenzenecyclobutylene (4-VBCB) was synthesized by cationic polymerization at −80 °C using 2-chloro-2,4,4-trimethylpentane (TMPCl) as initiator. The laws of copolymerization were investigated by changing the feed quantities of 4-VBCB. The molecular weight of the copolymer decreased, and [...] Read more.
A random copolymer of isobutylene (IB) and 4-vinylbenzenecyclobutylene (4-VBCB) was synthesized by cationic polymerization at −80 °C using 2-chloro-2,4,4-trimethylpentane (TMPCl) as initiator. The laws of copolymerization were investigated by changing the feed quantities of 4-VBCB. The molecular weight of the copolymer decreased, and its molecular weight distribution (MWD) increased with increasing 4-VBCB content. We proposed a possible copolymerization mechanism behind the increase in the chain transfer reaction to 4-VBCB with increasing of feed quantities of 4-VBCB. The thermal properties of the copolymers were studied by solid-phase heating and crosslinking. After crosslinking, the decomposition and glass transition temperatures (Tg) of the copolymer increased, the network structure that formed did not break when reheated, and the mechanical properties remarkably improved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Elastomers: From Theory to Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
A Nonequilibrium Model for Particle Networking/Jamming and Time-Dependent Dynamic Rheology of Filled Polymers
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010190 - 10 Jan 2020
Abstract
We describe an approach for modeling the filler network formation kinetics of particle-reinforced rubbery polymers—commonly called filler flocculation—that was developed by employing parallels between deformation effects in jammed particle systems and the influence of temperature on glass-forming materials. Experimental dynamic viscosity results were [...] Read more.
We describe an approach for modeling the filler network formation kinetics of particle-reinforced rubbery polymers—commonly called filler flocculation—that was developed by employing parallels between deformation effects in jammed particle systems and the influence of temperature on glass-forming materials. Experimental dynamic viscosity results were obtained concerning the strain-induced particle network breakdown and subsequent time-dependent reformation behavior for uncross-linked elastomers reinforced with carbon black and silica nanoparticles. Using a relaxation time function that depends on both actual dynamic strain amplitude and fictive (structural) strain, the model effectively represented the experimental data for three different levels of dynamic strain down-jump with a single set of parameters. This fictive strain model for filler networking is analogous to the established Tool–Narayanaswamy–Moynihan model for structural relaxation (physical aging) of nonequilibrium glasses. Compared to carbon black, precipitated silica particles without silane surface modification exhibited a greater overall extent of filler networking and showed more self-limiting behavior in terms of network formation kinetics in filled ethylene-propylene-diene rubber (EPDM). The EPDM compounds with silica or carbon black filler were stable during the dynamic shearing and recovery experiments at 160 °C, whereas irreversible dynamic modulus increases were noted when the polymer matrix was styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), presumably due to branching/cross-linking of SBR in the rheometer. Care must be taken when measuring and interpreting the time-dependent filler networking in unsaturated elastomers at high temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Elastomers: From Theory to Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Reversible Actuation Ability upon Light Stimulation of the Smart Systems with Controllably Grafted Graphene Oxide with Poly (Glycidyl Methacrylate) and PDMS Elastomer; L. Osicka

2. Phase Morphology of NR/SBR Blends; D. Klat

3. Modelling Filler Dispersion in Elastomers; R. Hentschke

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