Special Issue "Dielectric Barrier Discharges"

A special issue of Plasma (ISSN 2571-6182).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 7001

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Katharina Stapelmann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605, USA
Interests: plasma diagnostics; plasma chemistry; plasma–liquid interaction; plasma–cell interaction; plasma for life science applications; plasma cancer treatment
Dr. Savino Longo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari, Italy
Interests: numerical modeling; chemical kinetics; kinetic theory; hydrogen plasmas; electric discharges; astrochemistry
Dr. Pietro Ranieri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605, USA
Interests: nonthermal plasma; plasma medicine; plasma agriculture; plasma-liquid interface; plasma chemistry; Raman spectroscopy; pulsed dielectric barrier discharge chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) have been investigated for more than a century and were mainly used for ozone production until applications like plasma medicine and plasma-assisted conversion and catalysis sparked new interest. The rise of nanosecond-pulse generators for the generation of plasma has made it possible to deliver voltage pulses on the same time scale as the streamer lifetime in a DBD. This Special Issue focusses on DBDs from nanosecond to microsecond pulses, with an emphasis on the following topics:

  • Diagnostics
  • Physics and diagnostics of nanosecond pulsed DBDs
  • Self-organization in DBDs
  • Applications of DBDs: plasma medicine, plasma-assisted conversion and catalysis, and plasma agriculture
  • DBDs in contact with liquids: experiment and simulation

Dr. Katharina Stapelmann
Dr. Savino Longo
Dr. Pietro Ranieri
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Evaluation of Cylindrical Asymmetric Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Actuators for Surface Decontamination and Mixing
Plasma 2021, 4(4), 755-763; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma4040038 - 25 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 801
Abstract
Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) was used to evaluate cylindrical plasma actuators for inactivation of Salmonella enterica. A cylindrical SDBD configuration was evaluated to determine if the inherent induced body force could be leveraged to impel plasma species, such as reactive oxygen [...] Read more.
Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) was used to evaluate cylindrical plasma actuators for inactivation of Salmonella enterica. A cylindrical SDBD configuration was evaluated to determine if the inherent induced body force could be leveraged to impel plasma species, such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), as an apparatus to sterilize surfaces. The cylindrical structure is evaluated in this study to observe whether an increase in mixing is possible to efficiently distribute the plasma species, thereby improving bacterial inactivation efficiency. The increase in induced airflow of SDBD actuators with increased numbers of electrodes correlates with increased bacterial inactivation. These results suggest that improving the particle velocity, airflow mixing tendencies, and plasma volume for the same power inputs (same net power to the actuators) results in increased surface decontamination efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dielectric Barrier Discharges)
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Article
Evaluation of Cellular and Systemic Toxicity of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma-Treated N-Acetylcysteine as Potential Antimicrobial Catheter Lock Solution
Plasma 2021, 4(4), 732-744; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma4040036 - 26 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 989
Abstract
Intravenous catheter-related bloodstream infections are a cause of remarkable problems. Catheter lock solutions are used to keep catheter patency and prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections. The leakage of catheter lock solution to the bloodstream raises toxicity concerns. Plasma-treated liquids carry the potential to act [...] Read more.
Intravenous catheter-related bloodstream infections are a cause of remarkable problems. Catheter lock solutions are used to keep catheter patency and prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections. The leakage of catheter lock solution to the bloodstream raises toxicity concerns. Plasma-treated liquids carry the potential to act as catheter lock solutions by virtue of their strong antimicrobial effects. The present study investigates the tolerance of the proposed solution in vitro and in vivo. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) solution was treated with atmospheric-air DBD plasma and antimicrobial assays were performed. The cytotoxicity of the plasma-treated NAC solution was evaluated on an EA.hy926 cell line. Intravenous administration of plasma-treated NAC solution in different doses was given to Sprague Dawley rats. One week after infusion with plasma-treated NAC solution, first, the blood samples were collected, and then liver, kidney, tail vein, heart, and lung tissue samples were collected from euthanized rats for histopathological examination. The cytotoxicity of plasma-treated NAC solution depended on plasma treatment time, contact time, and cell number. A strong antimicrobial effect with no cytotoxicity of plasma-treated NAC solution was observed in endothelial cells. Based on blood tests and histopathological examination, no signs of systemic toxicity were observed that can be correlated to the plasma-treated-NAC solution. This solution has the potential to be used as a catheter lock solution with strong antimicrobial properties, keeping catheter patency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dielectric Barrier Discharges)
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Article
Parametric Studies of a Mercury-Free DBD Lamp
Plasma 2021, 4(1), 82-93; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma4010006 - 04 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 805
Abstract
Mercury discharge lamps are often used because of their high efficiency; however, the usage of mercury lamps will be restricted or forbidden for safety and environmental purposes. Finding alternative solutions to suppress mercury is of major interest. The aim of this work is [...] Read more.
Mercury discharge lamps are often used because of their high efficiency; however, the usage of mercury lamps will be restricted or forbidden for safety and environmental purposes. Finding alternative solutions to suppress mercury is of major interest. The aim of this work is to increase the luminous efficacy of a commercial-free mercury flat dielectric barrier discharge lamp (Planilum, St Gobain) in order to reach the necessary conditions for the lamp to be used as a daily lighting source. The lamp is made of two glass plates separated by a gap of 2 mm. The gap is filled by a neon xenon mixture. The external electrodes made of transparent ITO (indium tin oxide) are deposited on the lamp glass plates. The electrical signal applied to the electrodes generates a UV-emitting plasma inside the gap. Phosphors deposited on the glass allow the production of visible light. The original electrode geometry is plane-to-plane; this induces filamentary discharges. We show that changing the plane-to-plane geometry to a coplanar geometry allows the plasma to spread all over the electrode surface, and we can reach twice the efficacy of the lamp (32 lm/W) as compared to the original value. Using this new electrode geometrical configuration and changing the electrical signal from sinusoidal to a pulsed signal greatly improves the visual uniformity of the emitted light all over the lamp. Electrical and optical parametric measurements were performed to study the lamp characteristics. We show that it is possible to develop a free mercury lamp with an efficacy compatible with lighting purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dielectric Barrier Discharges)
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Article
Polymerization of Solid-State Aminophenol to Polyaniline Derivative Using a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma
Plasma 2020, 3(4), 187-195; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma3040014 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1129
Abstract
We present a method to prepare polyaminophenol from solid-state aminophenol monomers using atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. The polymerizations of o-aminophenol and m-aminophenol are studied. The polymers were analyzed via Fourier-Transform inferred spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The kinetics [...] Read more.
We present a method to prepare polyaminophenol from solid-state aminophenol monomers using atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. The polymerizations of o-aminophenol and m-aminophenol are studied. The polymers were analyzed via Fourier-Transform inferred spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The kinetics of the polymerization reactions were investigated by using UV-vis and the polymerization was found to be first-order for both o-aminophenol and m-aminophenol. The resulting polymer film exhibits a conductivity of 1.0 × 10−5 S/m for poly-o-aminophenol (PoAP) and 2.3 × 10−5 S/m for poly-m-aminophenol (PmAP), which are two orders more conductive than undoped (~10−7 S/m) polyaniline (PANI), The PoAP has a quinoid structure and the PmAP has an open ring keto-derivative structure. The process provides a simple method of preparing conductive polyaminophenol films. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dielectric Barrier Discharges)
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Review

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Review
Improving Seed Germination by Cold Atmospheric Plasma
Plasma 2022, 5(1), 98-110; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma5010008 - 09 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1374
Abstract
Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a tunable source of reactive species and other physical factors. It exerts luxuriant biochemical effects on diverse cells, including bacterial cells, mammalian cells, and plant cells. Over the past decade, CAP has shown promising application in modern agriculture. [...] Read more.
Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a tunable source of reactive species and other physical factors. It exerts luxuriant biochemical effects on diverse cells, including bacterial cells, mammalian cells, and plant cells. Over the past decade, CAP has shown promising application in modern agriculture. Here, we focused on the state of the art of plasma agriculture, particularly the improvement of seed germination rates. Typical plasma sources, underlying physical principles, and the chemical and cellular mechanism of plasma’s effect on plants seeds have been discussed in depth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dielectric Barrier Discharges)
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Review
The Resistive Barrier Discharge: A Brief Review of the Device and Its Biomedical Applications
Plasma 2021, 4(1), 75-80; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma4010004 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1083
Abstract
This paper reviews the principles behind the design and operation of the resistive barrier discharge, a low temperature plasma source that operates at atmospheric pressure. One of the advantages of this plasma source is that it can be operated using either DC or [...] Read more.
This paper reviews the principles behind the design and operation of the resistive barrier discharge, a low temperature plasma source that operates at atmospheric pressure. One of the advantages of this plasma source is that it can be operated using either DC or AC high voltages. Plasma generated by the resistive barrier discharge has been used to efficiently inactivate pathogenic microorganisms and to destroy cancer cells. These biomedical applications of low temperature plasma are of great interest because in recent times bacteria developed increased resistance to antibiotics and because present cancer therapies often are accompanied by serious side effects. Low temperature plasma, such the one generated by the resistive barrier discharge, is a technology that can help overcome these healthcare challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dielectric Barrier Discharges)
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