Bioactive Compounds of Plants: Extraction, Isolation, and Characterization

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2635

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Horticulture, Graudu 1, LV-3701 Dobele, Latvia
Interests: oil; phenolic compounds; polyphenols; tocopherols; tocotrienols; fatty acids; carotenoids; sterols; HPLC; SFC; extraction; cultivation; fruit
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia
Interests: natural product chemistry; NMR structure elucidation, drug discovery; medicinal chemistry; bioactive plant extract, antibacterial; antioxidants; α-glucosidase inhibitors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioactive compounds are abundant in plants. These compounds are being recognized for their diverse health benefits and properties. They are useful for various applications, including pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food industries, and biopesticides. Through bioguided analysis, the biological properties of plant extracts and isolated bioactive compounds can be examined to discover new compounds that have practical applications in improving human, animal, and environmental health.

The focus of this Special Issue is on analytical methods, including the extraction, separation, and characterization of all relevant plant active ingredients. The analysis of plant bioactive compounds is discussed, involving the application of common phytochemistry screening analysis, chromatographic techniques (such as HPLC, SFC and GC) and non-chromatographic techniques (such as immunoassay, NMR and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)).

Dr. Pawel Gornas
Dr. Alison Ung
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • plant material
  • bioactive compounds
  • secondary metabolites
  • phytochemicals
  • extraction
  • separation
  • identification
  • molecule structure elucidation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 672 KiB  
Article
Phytochemical Analysis of Pinus cembra Heartwood—UHPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn with Focus on Flavonoids, Stilbenes, Bibenzyls and Improved HPLC Separation
by Fabian Alperth, Anna Schneebauer, Olaf Kunert and Franz Bucar
Plants 2023, 12(19), 3388; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12193388 - 25 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 888
Abstract
The heartwood of the Swiss Stone Pine, Pinus cembra L., has been scarcely investigated for secondary metabolites for a long period of time. Considering age and relative simplicity of heartwood investigations dating back to the 1940s to 1960s, we conducted the first investigation [...] Read more.
The heartwood of the Swiss Stone Pine, Pinus cembra L., has been scarcely investigated for secondary metabolites for a long period of time. Considering age and relative simplicity of heartwood investigations dating back to the 1940s to 1960s, we conducted the first investigation of P. cembra heartwood by HPLC, using UHPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn and HPLC-DAD techniques in combination with isolation and NMR spectroscopy, with focus on stilbenes, bibenzyls and flavonoids. Analytical problems in the HPLC analysis of Pinus stilbenes and flavonoids on reversed stationary phases were also challenged, by comparing HPLC on pentafluorophenyl (PFP) and C18 stationary phases. Seven flavonoids (1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 11, 12), four stilbenes (4, 6, 10, 13), two bibenzyls (5, 9), three fatty acids (14, 16, 17) and one diterpenic acid (15) were detected in an ethanolic extract of Pinus cembra heartwood. HPLC comparison of reversed stationary phases in HPLC showed that the antifungal, antibacterial and chemosensitizing dihydropinosylvin monomethyl ether (9) and pinosylvin monomethyl ether (10) can be separated on PFP, but not on C18 material, when eluting with a screening gradient of 20–100% acetonitrile. Flavonoid separation showed additional benefits of combining analyses on different stationary phases, as flavonoids 7 and 8 could only be separated on one of two C18 stationary phases. Earlier phytochemical results for heartwood investigations were shown to be mostly correct, yet expandable. Substances 5 to 12 were found in alignment with these references, proving remarkable phytochemical analyses at the time. Evidence for the described presence of pinobanksin could not be found. Substances 1 to 4 and 13 have to our knowledge not yet been described for P. cembra. Full article
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Review

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29 pages, 7848 KiB  
Review
The Ethnopharmacology, Phytochemistry and Bioactivities of the Corymbia Genus (Myrtaceae)
by Matthew J. Perry and Phurpa Wangchuk
Plants 2023, 12(21), 3686; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12213686 - 25 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Plants have been vital to human survival for aeons, especially for their unique medicinal properties. Trees of the Eucalyptus genus are well known for their medicinal properties; however, little is known of the ethnopharmacology and bioactivities of their close relatives in the Corymbia [...] Read more.
Plants have been vital to human survival for aeons, especially for their unique medicinal properties. Trees of the Eucalyptus genus are well known for their medicinal properties; however, little is known of the ethnopharmacology and bioactivities of their close relatives in the Corymbia genus. Given the current lack of widespread knowledge of the Corymbia genus, this review aims to provide the first summary of the ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and bioactivities of this genus. The Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched to identify research articles on the biological activities, phytochemistry and ethnomedical uses of Corymbia species. Of the 115 Corymbia species known, 14 species were found to have ethnomedical uses for the leaves, kino and/or bark. Analysis of the references obtained for these 14 Corymbia spp. revealed that the essential oils, crude extracts and compounds isolated from these species possess an array of biological activities including anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-protozoal, anti-viral, larvicidal, insecticidal, acaricidal, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-diabetic activities, highlighting the potential for this under-studied genus to provide lead compounds and treatments for a host of medical conditions. Full article
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