Advanced Research on African Medicinal Plants

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 5212

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Cape peninsula university of technology, Bellville 7535, South Africa
Interests: phytochemistry; natural products chemistry; green nanotechnology; traditional medicine
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Co-Guest Editor
Science and Technology Division, Multidisciplinary Research Centre (MRC), University of Namibia, Windhoek 9000, Namibia
Interests: food science and technology; food microbiology; ethnobotany and food biotechnology; indigenous knowledge system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The African continent continues to afford an exciting opportunity to treat human pathologies. The potential economic and health benefits of developing new drugs from African medicinal plants and preserving and promoting traditional knowledge and practices are of great importance. In continuation of raising international importance of Traditional African Medicine (TAM) as the primary source of drug discovery, we invite colleagues from different disciplines related to African medicine to contribute their original research papers to this Special Issue.

We had the first volume of the Special Issue last year and published 12 articles representing the different fields of study on traditional medicines and medicinal plants and their value-added products from the African continent. The new Special Issue volume will accept research articles/reviews from all African colleagues and/or focusing on any medicinal plants originating from Africa.

In this Special Issue, we would like to invite different research groups to submit their research manuscripts, systematic reviews, scoping reviews, mini-reviews, opinions, notes, field manuals, and short communications that focus on traditional medicinal records, databases, access benefits sharing and regulatory procedures, chemistry, toxicity, ethnopharmacology, and biological activity of African medicinal plants and traditional medicine.

Prof. Dr. Ahmed Hussein
Prof. Ahmad Cheikhyouseef
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • African continents
  • antimicrobial activity
  • traditional medicine documentation
  • toxicity of traditional medicine
  • in vivo biological activities
  • in vitro biological activities
  • indigenous knowledge system
  • medicinal plants, phytochemical investigation
  • structure elucidation
  • discovery of new bioactive compounds

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1090 KiB  
Article
Comparative Bioactive Compounds and Mineral Properties of South African and Lesotho Artemisia afra (Jacq.) Genotypes
by Matumelo Rafiri, Moosa Mahmood Sedibe and Goitsemang Mahlomola Hendry Dikane
Plants 2024, 13(8), 1126; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13081126 - 17 Apr 2024
Viewed by 864
Abstract
Artemisia afra is a plant that grows in the northern, central, and coastal regions of South Africa, as well as in neighboring countries such as Eswatini and Lesotho. These phytochemicals can be used as active compounds in plant-based medicine. Therefore, it is important [...] Read more.
Artemisia afra is a plant that grows in the northern, central, and coastal regions of South Africa, as well as in neighboring countries such as Eswatini and Lesotho. These phytochemicals can be used as active compounds in plant-based medicine. Therefore, it is important to determine how plant minerals and phytochemicals, particularly bioactive compounds, are affected by the geolocation in which they grow. This study aimed to evaluate the mineral and phytochemical properties of A. afra genotypes in the southern regions of Africa. Leaf samples of A. afra genotypes were collected from Lesotho, in Mohale’s Hoek and Roma. In South Africa, leaf samples were collected in Wepener and Hobhouse, and 80 plants were randomly selected for phytochemical and mineral analyses. This study reveals that phosphorus, calcium, potassium, iron, and zinc loaded positively to the first principal component, while copper loaded positively to the second principal component with variabilities of 29.95% and 21.12%, respectively. Furthermore, both the Mohale’s Hoek and Hobhouse genotypes exhibited relatively high levels of ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and tannins. It is worth noting that genotypes from Roma and Wepener showed higher levels of foliar magnesium. Thus, the Mohale’s Hoek and Hobhouse genotypes could be recommended for their better phytochemical contents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research on African Medicinal Plants)
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13 pages, 4363 KiB  
Article
Methoxylated Flavonols and ent-Kaurane Diterpenes from the South African Helichrysum rutilans and Their Cosmetic Potential
by Olugbenga K. Popoola, Jeanine L. Marnewick, Emmanuel I. Iwuoha and Ahmed A. Hussein
Plants 2023, 12(15), 2870; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12152870 - 4 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1004
Abstract
Chromatographic fractionation of a methanol extract of Helichrysum rutilans afforded seven known compounds. The isolated compounds were identified as 5,7,8-trihydroxy-3,6-dimethoxyflavone-8-O-2-methyl-2-butanoate (C-1), 5,7-dihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxyflavone (C-2), 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (C-3), 5-hydroxy-3,6,7-trimethoxyflavone (C-4), ent-kaurenoic acid (C-5), [...] Read more.
Chromatographic fractionation of a methanol extract of Helichrysum rutilans afforded seven known compounds. The isolated compounds were identified as 5,7,8-trihydroxy-3,6-dimethoxyflavone-8-O-2-methyl-2-butanoate (C-1), 5,7-dihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxyflavone (C-2), 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (C-3), 5-hydroxy-3,6,7-trimethoxyflavone (C-4), ent-kaurenoic acid (C-5), ent-kauran-18-al (C-6), and 15-α-hydroxy-(-)-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (C-7). Compounds C-1–C-4 demonstrated high antioxidant capacities on ORAC hydroxyl radical (2.114 ± 4.01; 2.413 ± 6.20; 1.924 ± 16.40; 1.917 ± 3.91) × 106; ORAC peroxyl radical (3.523 ± 3.22; 2.935 ± 0.13; 2.431 ± 8.63; 2.814 ± 5.20) × 103 µMTE/g; and FRAP (1251.45 ± 4.18; 1402.62 ± 5.77) µMAAE/g, respectively. Moderate inhibitory activities against Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation were observed for C-1–C-4 as IC50 values of 13.123 ± 0.34, 16.421 ± 0.92, 11.64 ± 1.72, 14.90 ± 0.06 µg/mL, respectively, while their respective anti-tyrosinase activities with IC50 values of 25.735 ± 9.62, 24.062 ± 0.61, 39.03 ± 13.12, 37.67 ± 0.98 µg/mL were also observed. All compounds demonstrated TEAC values within the range of 1105–1424 µMTE/g. The result is an indication that a methanol extract of H. rutilans might possibly be a good source of natural antioxidants against ailments caused by cellular oxidative stress and as inhibitors against skin depigmentation, as well as possible raw materials needed for slowing down perishable agricultural products. This is the first report on the phytochemical and biological evaluation of H. rutilans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research on African Medicinal Plants)
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Review

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44 pages, 872 KiB  
Review
Research on Moringa (Moringa oleifera Lam.) in Africa
by Hamid El Bilali, Iro Dan Guimbo, Romaric Kiswendsida Nanema, Hamidou Falalou, Zakaria Kiebre, Veli-Matti Rokka, Sheirita Reine Fanta Tietiambou, Jacques Nanema, Lawali Dambo, Francesca Grazioli, Abdel Kader Naino Jika, Maria Gonnella and Filippo Acasto
Plants 2024, 13(12), 1613; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13121613 - 11 Jun 2024
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Abstract
While Moringa oleifera Lam. is gaining importance in Africa, especially sub-Saharan Africa, it is unclear whether research is following the quick pace of its development on the continent. Therefore, this article analyzes the landscape of research dealing with moringa in Africa. This systematic [...] Read more.
While Moringa oleifera Lam. is gaining importance in Africa, especially sub-Saharan Africa, it is unclear whether research is following the quick pace of its development on the continent. Therefore, this article analyzes the landscape of research dealing with moringa in Africa. This systematic review draws upon 299 eligible articles identified through a search carried out on the Web of Science in April 2023. Research on M. oleifera is rather recent in Africa but interest is increasing among scholars. While the research field is multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral, the literature seems to focus on biological and environmental sciences. Moreover, research is performed mainly in South Africa, Nigeria, Egypt, and Ghana. The analysis suggests a significant potential contribution of moringa to food security and nutrition, climate change mitigation/adaptation, farming systems resilience, and livelihoods. Its versatility and diverse applications and uses make moringa particularly interesting for developing countries, such as African ones. However, this review also underscores some factors hindering its development. Therefore, there is a need to strengthen research on moringa to unlock its potential in Africa. Investments in research, innovation, and development can help address the many challenges that Africa faces and contribute to the transition towards sustainable and resilient food systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research on African Medicinal Plants)
25 pages, 6976 KiB  
Review
The Hepatoprotective Effects of Moringa oleifera against Antiretroviral-Induced Cytotoxicity in HepG2 Cells: A Review
by Mbasakazi Saki, Helena De Villiers, Claudia Ntsapi and Charlette Tiloke
Plants 2023, 12(18), 3235; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12183235 - 12 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2022
Abstract
The untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a lentivirus species that attacks immune cells (CD4+ T cells), causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV-positive people manage HIV/AIDS by using antiretroviral therapy (ART). The ART treatment regimen contains two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and one [...] Read more.
The untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a lentivirus species that attacks immune cells (CD4+ T cells), causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV-positive people manage HIV/AIDS by using antiretroviral therapy (ART). The ART treatment regimen contains two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor/integrase strand transfer inhibitor. Tenofovir, an NRTI approved for managing HIV infection, is associated with hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis, which are linked to mitochondrial toxicity and oxidative stress. Due to side-effects associated with ART, people living with HIV often use medicinal plants or a combination of medicinal plants with ART to promote adherence and diminish the side-effects and cytotoxicity. The Moringa oleifera (MO) tree from the family of Moringaceae is among the medicinal trees studied in managing HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. The MO tree extracts have been reported to have inhibitory activity primarily against HIV due to their bioactive compounds. However, there is a scarcity of knowledge about the use of the MO tree amongst HIV/AIDS patients receiving ART in South Africa and its effect on patient compliance and outcomes. Thus, this review aims to outline the impact of MO aqueous leaf extract on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses in human HepG2 liver cells after exposure to antiretrovirals such as tenofovir. The review will contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the potential protective effect of MO aqueous leaf extract on tenofovir-induced cytotoxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research on African Medicinal Plants)
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