Special Issue "Sargassum Golden Tides, a Global Problem"

A special issue of Phycology (ISSN 2673-9410).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. John James Milledge
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering and Science, Algae Biotechnology Research Group, University of Greenwich, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK
Interests: algae; seaweed; sargassum, biofuel; biogas; biorefinery; anaerobic digestion; nutraceuticals; pharmaceuticals; energy balance; ensilage; food technology; wastewater.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Ms. Anne Desrochers
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Resource Management and Environmental Studies, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados
Interests: interest in the valorisation of pelagic Sargassum and related challenges; particular interest in Sargassum-derived products for agriculture, environmental restoration, sustainable building materials and bioplastics in the wider Caribbean context; other research interests include monitoring of pollutants in the environment, including pesticides and heavy metals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Beach and coastline inundations by Sargassum blooms have been called the single greatest threat to tourism and fisheries in the Caribbean. The impact of Sargassum is not only economic but has implications for the environment and health of coastal ecosystems and communities. Golden tides of Sargassum are also causing major problems in other areas of the world, such as the Mexican and West Africa coasts. This recurrent challenge is the focus of increasing research and innovations.

This Special Issue will emphasise the various impacts and potential uses of Sargassum. Submissions from research groups worldwide are requested. Also, papers from the conference “Sargassum Golden Tides, a global problem” will be published in this issue. Scientific articles on the composition; potential uses (biofuels, fertiliser, feed, food industry, biochemical, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, activated carbon and others); environmental, socio-economical and health impacts; monitoring; inundation prediction; and case studies are welcomed. Publications from multidisciplinary groups are especially encouraged.

Dr. John James Milledge
Ms. Anne Desrochers
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Phycology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sargassum
  • S. natans
  • S. fluitans
  • Golden tide

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Caribbean-Wide, Negative Emissions Solution to Sargassum spp. Low-Cost Collection Device and Sustainable Disposal Method
Phycology 2021, 1(1), 49-75; https://doi.org/10.3390/phycology1010004 - 12 Aug 2021
Viewed by 506
Abstract
Sargassum spp. blooms exacerbated by climate change and agricultural runoff are inundating Caribbean beaches, emitting toxic fumes and greenhouse gases through decomposition. This hurts tourism, artisanal fishing, shore-based industry, human health, standards-of-living, coastal ecology, and the global climate. Barriers, collection machinery, and Sargassum [...] Read more.
Sargassum spp. blooms exacerbated by climate change and agricultural runoff are inundating Caribbean beaches, emitting toxic fumes and greenhouse gases through decomposition. This hurts tourism, artisanal fishing, shore-based industry, human health, standards-of-living, coastal ecology, and the global climate. Barriers, collection machinery, and Sargassum valorization have been unable to provide sufficient, sustainable, or widespread relief. This article presents a total Sargassum management system that is effective, low-impact, and economically scalable across the Caribbean. Littoral Collection Modules (LCMs), attached to artisanal fishing boats, collect Sargassum in nets which are brought to a barge. When full, the barge is towed to the deep ocean where Sargassum is pumped to ~150–200 m depth, whereafter it continues sinking (Sargassum Ocean Sequestration of Carbon; “SOS Carbon”). Costing and negative emissions calculations for this system show cleanup costs <$1/m3 and emissions reduction potential up to 1.356 → 3.029 tCO2e/dmt Sargassum. COVID-19 decimated Caribbean tourism, adding to the pressures of indebtedness and natural disasters facing the region. The “SOS Carbon strategy” could help the Caribbean “build back better” by establishing a negative emissions industry that builds resilience against Sargassum and flight shame (“flygskam”). Employing fishermen to operate LCMs achieves socioeconomic goals while increasing Sargassum cleanup and avoiding landfilling achieves sustainable development goals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sargassum Golden Tides, a Global Problem)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Challenges of Turning the Sargassum Crisis into Gold: Current Constraints and Implications for the Caribbean
Phycology 2021, 1(1), 27-48; https://doi.org/10.3390/phycology1010003 - 05 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1018
Abstract
Over the last decade, the Caribbean has seen massive, episodic influxes of pelagic sargassum negatively impacting coastal ecosystems, people’s livelihoods and climate-sensitive sectors. Addressing this issue solely as a hazard has proven extremely costly and attention is slowly turning towards the potential opportunities [...] Read more.
Over the last decade, the Caribbean has seen massive, episodic influxes of pelagic sargassum negatively impacting coastal ecosystems, people’s livelihoods and climate-sensitive sectors. Addressing this issue solely as a hazard has proven extremely costly and attention is slowly turning towards the potential opportunities for sargassum reuse and valorization. However, turning the ‘sargassum crisis into gold’ is not easy. In this study we use a multi-method approach to learn from sargassum stakeholders (researchers, entrepreneurs and established businesses) across the Caribbean about the constraints and challenges they are facing. These can be grouped into five broad categories: (1) unpredictable supply of sargassum; (2) issues related with the chemical composition of the seaweed; (3) harvest, transport and storage; (4) governance; and (5) funding. Specific issues and potential solutions associated with each of these categories are reviewed in detail and recommended actions are mapped to five entry points along a generalized value chain to demonstrate how these actions can contribute to the development of sustainable sargassum value chains that promote economic opportunities and could help alleviate impacts of massive influxes. This paper offers guidance to policy makers and funding agencies on existing gaps and challenges that need to be addressed in order to scale-up successful and sustainable solutions to the sargassum crisis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sargassum Golden Tides, a Global Problem)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop