Special Issue "Interprofessional Working and Collaborative Practice"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Lesley Diack
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, AB22 8LF, UK
Interests: Technology-enhanced learning; improving the student experience; lifelong learning
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sundari Joseph
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Robert Gordon University
Interests: interprofessional education and collaborative working; curriculum design; clinical skills
Dr. Alla El-Awaisi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Pharmacy, Qatar University
Interests: interprofessional education; collaborative practice; pharmacy practice and pharmacy education

Special Issue Information

Since the 1960s interprofessional education (IPE) has been seen as being important in the training of health and social care professionals. This IPE has been defined by the Centre for the Advancement of Interprofessional Education (CAIPE) as education when students ‘learn, with, from and about each other.’ The movement for IPE has grown over the years to encompass most of the globe with Canada, USA, UK and Australasia leading the way in the early years. Countries in the Middle East and Africa are now beginning on their IPE journeys and are benefitting from the experiences of the earlier pioneers.

However there is much to learn about IPE and the evidence base for its impact on patient safety still needs to be strengthened. Questions have to be answered on whether there is an optimum time for this learning? Should it be pre or post registration? What effect is there on collaborative practice? Does collaborative practice exist? What are the best models for IPE and collaborative practice? 

This special edition of the journal will investigate the impact of IPE on pharmacy training and practice but also the impact pharmacy has had on IPE.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Interprofessional education
  • Collaborative practice
  • Interprofessional working
  • Transdisciplinary models

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Experiences of Pharmacy Trainees from an Interprofessional Immersion Training
Pharmacy 2018, 6(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6020037 - 25 Apr 2018
Abstract
Interprofessional education is essential in that it helps healthcare disciplines better utilize each other and provide team-based collaboration that improves patient care. Many pharmacy training programs struggle to implement interprofessional education. This purpose of the study was to examine the effect of a [...] Read more.
Interprofessional education is essential in that it helps healthcare disciplines better utilize each other and provide team-based collaboration that improves patient care. Many pharmacy training programs struggle to implement interprofessional education. This purpose of the study was to examine the effect of a 30-h interprofessional training that included pharmacy students to determine if the training helped these students build valuable knowledge and skills while working alongside other health care professions. The interprofessional training included graduate-level trainees from pharmacy, behavioral health, nursing, and family medicine programs where the trainees worked within teams to build interprofessional education competencies based on the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies. Sixteen pharmacy trainees participated in the training and completed pre- and post-test measures. Data were collected over a two-year period with participants completing the Team Skills Scale and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale. Paired sample t-tests indicated that, after this training, pharmacy trainees showed significant increases in feeling better able to work in healthcare teams and valuing interprofessional practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interprofessional Working and Collaborative Practice)
Open AccessArticle
Pharmacists as Interprofessional Collaborators and Leaders through Clinical Pathways
Pharmacy 2018, 6(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6010024 - 16 Mar 2018
Abstract
Pharmacists possess pivotal competencies and expertise in developing clinical pathways (CPs). We present a tertiary care facility experience of pharmacists vis-a-vis interprofessional collaboration for designing and implementing CPs. We participated in the development of CPs as leading members of a collaborative team of [...] Read more.
Pharmacists possess pivotal competencies and expertise in developing clinical pathways (CPs). We present a tertiary care facility experience of pharmacists vis-a-vis interprofessional collaboration for designing and implementing CPs. We participated in the development of CPs as leading members of a collaborative team of healthcare professionals. We reviewed literature, aligning it with hospital formulary and institutional standards, and participated in weekly team meetings for six months. Several tools and services were adapted to guide prescribing and standardization of care through time-bound order sets. Fifteen CPs leading to admissions in medical wards were developed and integrated into Computerized Prescriber Order Entry (CPOE) sets. Tools and services included (1) reporting of creatinine clearance to guide optimum dosing; (2) advisory flags for dosing and infusion rates; (3) piloting of medication reconciliation and counseling services before discharge were initiated; (4) Arabic drug leaflets were designed to educate patients; and (5) five CPs were included in pragmatic randomized control trials with a clinical pharmacist as co-investigator. Clinical pharmacists conducted continuous orientation to various healthcare professionals throughout the process. CPs provide unique opportunities for establishing and evaluating patient-centered pharmaceutical services and allow clinical pharmacists to demonstrate interprofessional leadership in collaboration with multidisciplinary teams. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interprofessional Working and Collaborative Practice)
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