Topical Collection "Oral and Systemic Health: Border Dentistry and the Borders of Dental Practice"

Editors

Prof. Dr. Giuseppina Campisi
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Rehabilitation, Fragility and Continuity of Care, Unit of Oral Medicine, University Hospital Palermo, 90127 Palermo, Italy
Interests: oral medicine; medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw; head and neck oncology; viral oral infections; dental public health; teledentistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Marco Mascitti
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Clinical Specialist and Dental Sciences, Marche Polytechnic University, 60121 Ancona, Italy
Interests: oral squamous cell carcinoma; head and neck cancer; prognostic markers in tissues; odontogenic neoformations
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Topical Collection aims to meet the need to provide a response to the excessive compartmentalization of knowledge that has traditionally existed between dentistry and other disciplines, such as health sciences, life sciences, and social and environmental sciences. In particular, the growing crisis of the traditional “disease-centered” care system requires a radical rethinking of traditional dental and oral health management, favoring a paradigm shift toward a multidisciplinary “patient-centered” care approach. Indeed, the need to face emerging problems, such as the progressive aging of the population with the associated increase in dental care needs, and the appearance of new opportunities, in particular the impact of technological progress on healthcare, represent the pillars on which to build novel therapeutic strategies in dentistry.

The aim of this Topical Collection is to provide a platform on which different specialists can address, in a multidisciplinary way, “border dentistry”, highlighting the links between oral and systemic health.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppina Campisi
Dr. Marco Mascitti
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Oral is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

2021

Article
Does Maxillary Retrusion in Skeletal Class III Malocclusion Affect the Perception of Facial Aesthetics? Evaluation of Different Groups
Oral 2021, 1(3), 216-223; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1030021 - 15 Jul 2021
Viewed by 941
Abstract
Background: The perception of facial aesthetics is a complex topic due to its subjective nature and it can be influenced by several factors. The purpose of this study was to compare the perception of general dentists, orthodontists, maxillofacial surgeons, and lay people by [...] Read more.
Background: The perception of facial aesthetics is a complex topic due to its subjective nature and it can be influenced by several factors. The purpose of this study was to compare the perception of general dentists, orthodontists, maxillofacial surgeons, and lay people by evaluating facial aesthetics in skeletal class III patients, especially for maxillary sagittal position. Methods: A survey consisting of three sets of pre-treatment photographs of four dysmorphic patients was used. The questionnaire was submitted to a total of 200 participants divided into the following four subgroups: general dentists, orthodontists, maxillofacial surgeons, and lay people. Their opinion on facial disharmony, sagittal position of the jaws, asymmetry of the chin, projection of the cheekbone area, and lip aesthetics was recorded. Results: Significant differences were found between experts and non-experts in the perception of the maxillary position, asymmetry of the chin and zygomatic area (p < 0.01). No statistically significant differences were found among the groups in the perception of mandibular position and lip aesthetics. Conclusion: The respondents with a medical or dental background perceived the presence of maxillary retrusion more than others. Only orthodontists and maxillofacial surgeons have recognized an alteration of the middle facial third as a greater component of skeletal class III malocclusion. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Exploring the Views of Dentists and Dental Support Staff Regarding Multiple Caries in Children
Oral 2021, 1(3), 199-215; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1030020 - 09 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1044
Abstract
This paper explores the reasons for multiple caries in children from the viewpoint of clinical practice, namely General Dental Practitioners (GDPs) and their teams, to identify obstacles to reducing inequalities in caries experience. The context of the research is the distribution of dental [...] Read more.
This paper explores the reasons for multiple caries in children from the viewpoint of clinical practice, namely General Dental Practitioners (GDPs) and their teams, to identify obstacles to reducing inequalities in caries experience. The context of the research is the distribution of dental caries in UK communities where disease prevalence correlates with deprivation and these sub-groups are not attending for dental care on a regular basis. A focus group of dentists, along with individual interviews with dentists and dental support staff were chosen to explore the perceptions of GDPs, Dental Therapists, and Dental Nurses. The content analysis of the data highlighted six main themes. These included sugar, in terms of the amount, availability and the marketing of it; socioeconomic associations with dental caries experience; the dentists’ role; the National Health Service (NHS) dental contract in terms of time-constraints in meeting targets and finally, the management of the child with multiple caries. This research suggests that there are possible barriers to the delivery of equitable care to populations. These include availability and access to GDPs along with the perceptions held by GDPs. Training aimed to develop a targeted behavioural approach towards deprived sub-groups is required in order to avoid unintended social exclusion. Full article
Article
Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma on Gingiva, Edentulous Ridge, and Retromolar Pad: A Case Series
Oral 2021, 1(2), 159-167; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1020016 - 18 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1430
Abstract
(1) Background: Gingival cancer has a significant incidence and is often diagnosed at advanced stages. The aim of this paper is to highlight its clinical aspects on the basis of a case series analysis in order to promote awareness and improve the diagnosis [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Gingival cancer has a significant incidence and is often diagnosed at advanced stages. The aim of this paper is to highlight its clinical aspects on the basis of a case series analysis in order to promote awareness and improve the diagnosis process. (2) Methods: Oral cancers diagnosed and treated at three Italian University Hospitals over ten years were retrospectively investigated. Cancer location on the gingiva, edentulous ridge, and retromolar pad was addressed. Data regarding clinical features, stage at the diagnosis, and time from presenting symptoms to first medical consultation were retrieved. (3) Results: Thirty-three cancers located on the gingiva, edentulous ridge, and retromolar pad were retrieved from 276 total oral cancer cases (11.9%). A median of 50 days (range 2–300) passed for the patient to seek for a medical evaluation. At the time of diagnosis, 63.3% were advanced stage cancers, mainly located at the mandible (91%), especially in the retromolar pad (48.5%) and the edentulous alveolar ridge (24.2%). Lesions were red (45.5%), red and white (45.4%), or white (9.1%), appearing as an ulcer (69.7%), exophytic mass (12.1%) or flat lesion (12.1%). Sixty-six percent of cancers were completely asymptomatic, regardless their clinical appearance. A statistically significant association between the time from the presentation of symptoms to the first medical consultation and the cancers stage was found. (4) Conclusions: The clinical appearance of gingival cancer is very polymorphous; its understanding may be significant to improve patient education and early medical consultation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Communication
Commonalities between ENT Specialists and Oral Medicine Experts: Old HPV Diseases and New Oral HPV-Cancer along the Borders
Oral 2021, 1(2), 108-111; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1020011 - 02 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2571
Abstract
A human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is globally one of the most common causes of sexually transmitted infections of the mucous membranes (genital, anal and oral). Over the last decade, an increasing number of young patients have been infected due to the changes in [...] Read more.
A human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is globally one of the most common causes of sexually transmitted infections of the mucous membranes (genital, anal and oral). Over the last decade, an increasing number of young patients have been infected due to the changes in sexual habits in the general population. The majority of the lesions are benign; however, substantial scientific evidence has suggested a role for the HPV family in the carcinogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). It is proposed that dentists, in addition to ENT specialists, should apply standardized management protocols in order to construct a well-defined pathway in terms of diagnosis, which is based on a PCR diagnostic technique and the management of those lesions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Calcium Silicate Cements vs. Epoxy Resin Based Cements: Narrative Review
Oral 2021, 1(1), 23-35; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1010004 - 08 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1108
Abstract
In recent years, calcium silicate cements have been introduced. The purpose of this study is to analyze the main differences between calcium silicate-based cements and epoxy resin-based cements, analyzing the scientific literature of the last year to highlight the main advantages for predictable [...] Read more.
In recent years, calcium silicate cements have been introduced. The purpose of this study is to analyze the main differences between calcium silicate-based cements and epoxy resin-based cements, analyzing the scientific literature of the last year to highlight the main advantages for predictable clinical use. Data collected from the included studies were used in order to analyze different features: chemical-physical properties, cytotoxicity and cell migration, inflammatory response, mineralizing and osteogenic activity, ion release and the filling efficiency of root canals. The calcium silicate cements analyzed in these studies showed good biological and mechanical properties compared to conventional resin-based cements, resulting in better biocompatibility and less cytotoxicity; long-term studies are needed, but these cements have ideal characteristics to allow efficient filling of root canals. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop