Topical Collection "Synthesis, Testing and Mechanical Behavior of Dental Biomaterials at Different Clinical Parameters"

Editors

Dr. Joao Paulo Tribst
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Reconstructive Dentistry, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: dental materials; adhesive dentistry; biomechanics; finite element analysis; dental implants; prosthetic dentistry; dental ceramics; fatigue; dental restoration failure
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Eugenio Pedullà
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of General Surgery and Surgical – Medical Specialties, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: dentistry; endodontics; oral surgery; dental materials; 3D imaging

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although the oral environment can present an unfriendly effect on dental biomaterials, the synergy collaboration of many studies from different fields, such as material sciences, biology, chemistry and mechanics, has allowed us to provide durable dental treatments and positive life quality improvements for our patients using dental biomaterials applied in many ways.

Currently, dental biomaterials can be developed with unique microstructure, be susceptible to specific surface treatments, with an isotropic behavior and sometimes viscoelastic performance present. The overall performance of the dental treatment can be affected by the use of smart materials in terms of durability and mechanical resistance, as well as by the processing methods, clinical parameters, and laboratorial techniques applied during oral rehabilitation.

Dental biomaterials, in general, are extremely important to dentistry today and allow us to recover missing biological tissues with a proper biomimetic concept and adequate esthetics. Nevertheless, the dental biomaterial properties related to their durability, mechanical, and long-term behavior should be known before applicability in the human body can be achieved.

This topical collection focuses on the development of synthesis, testing, and evaluation of the mechanical behavior of dental biomaterials at different clinical parameters.

The topics of interest include but are not limited to:

    Indirect materials for prosthetic dentistry;

    Resin composites and cements for restorative dentistry;

    Post-endodontic treatment performance;

    Rehabilitation with endosseous implants;

    Post-and-core dental treatments;

    Fractography of contemporary dental materials;

    Oral trauma prevention and treatment with biomaterials;

Clinical and laboratory research of basic and applied performance of dental materials.

Dr. Joao Paulo Tribst
Prof. Dr. Eugenio Pedullà
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Oral is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dental biomaterials
  • dental implants
  • biomechanics

Published Papers (7 papers)

2021

Technical Note
From Denture to the Final Implant-Supported Prosthesis Using a Full-Digital Protocol: A Dental Technique
Oral 2021, 1(4), 332-339; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1040033 - 01 Dec 2021
Viewed by 472
Abstract
Proper maxillomandibular relationship registration can be clinically challenging during a digital workflow in full-arch rehabilitations. This dental technique requires the manufacturing and use of a hybrid surgical guide custom scanning device, indicated to be used during implant placement surgery, in addition to being [...] Read more.
Proper maxillomandibular relationship registration can be clinically challenging during a digital workflow in full-arch rehabilitations. This dental technique requires the manufacturing and use of a hybrid surgical guide custom scanning device, indicated to be used during implant placement surgery, in addition to being used to simultaneously register the maxillomandibular relationship and transfer the implants’ 3D positioning, ensuring a fully digital workflow in full-arch implant-supported prosthesis rehabilitation. The sequence of steps presented here will allow dentists and dental technicians to conduct rehabilitations from denture to the final implant-supported prosthesis using a full-digital protocol, using a minimal quantity of intraoral devices and digital tools. Full article
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Brief Report
Effect of Abutment Type and Tightening Sequence on Torque Maintenance Capacity after Mechanical Cycling in Splinted Implant-Supported Restorations
Oral 2021, 1(4), 300-306; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1040029 - 11 Oct 2021
Viewed by 502
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the screw removal torque of mini-conical prosthetic components and straight trunnion of indexed morse taper implants after mechanical cycling. The sample consisted of 40 implants and 20 mini-conical prosthetic components (MC group) and 20 straight [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to compare the screw removal torque of mini-conical prosthetic components and straight trunnion of indexed morse taper implants after mechanical cycling. The sample consisted of 40 implants and 20 mini-conical prosthetic components (MC group) and 20 straight trunnion components (ST group). Each group consisted of 10 specimens, with 2 implants in each, and cobalt–chromium metallic crowns were screwed into each sample. The components of the MC group received a torque of 20 N-cm with a digital torque wrench, and after 10 min were retightened with the same value as the initial torque. The components of the ST group received a torque of 30 N-cm, with a digital torque wrench, and after 10 min, they were retightened with the same value. The screws of the respective crowns of the two groups received a torque of 10 N-cm and after 10 min were retightened with the same value. Each group was subjected to the fatigue test in a mechanical cycler at 2,000,000 cycles, with a load of 250 N and frequency of 4 Hz. At the end of the fatigue test, the loosening torque of each screw of the specimens was measured through a digital torque wrench. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test. In both groups, there were loss of torque. The results showed no statistic difference between MC and ST groups (p > 0.05). Full article
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Article
Stress Distribution in Modified Veneer Crowns: 3D Finite Element Analysis
Oral 2021, 1(3), 272-280; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1030026 - 16 Sep 2021
Viewed by 755
Abstract
(1) Background: to propose a new approach for crown veneers, with the use of an aesthetic porcelain coating, only in part of the zirconia infrastructure, and to analyze its biomechanical behavior to minimize chipping failures. (2) Methods: a maxillary molar was modeled using [...] Read more.
(1) Background: to propose a new approach for crown veneers, with the use of an aesthetic porcelain coating, only in part of the zirconia infrastructure, and to analyze its biomechanical behavior to minimize chipping failures. (2) Methods: a maxillary molar was modeled using CAD software, preparing for traditional crowns and veneer crowns with various lengths. Five groups were formed: M—control group (monolithic crown of ultra-translucent zirconia); B—conventional (bilayer crown of ultra-translucent zirconia and ceramic covering); V—veneer (ultra-translucent zirconia crown with reduction only in the buccal and application of covering ceramics); V1—ultra-translucent zirconia crown with buccal reduction and 1 mm occlusal extension for covering ceramic application); V1.5—ultra-translucent zirconia crown with buccal reduction and 1.5 mm occlusal extension for application of covering ceramics. A load of 600 N was performed axially to a fossa bottom to simulate parafunction, and 300 N to the cusp tip to obtain the maximum principal stress results. (3) Results: group B showed a higher stress concentration in the occlusal region of the restorations, while the other groups absorbed the stress and dissipated it throughout the crown, presenting a higher stress concentration in the interface region with the tooth. (4) Conclusion: the highly translucent zirconia ceramic only associated with buccal covering ceramic could add aesthetic gain and rigidity to the system and could be a good option to restore maxillary molars in patients who do not have parafunction. Full article
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Article
Mechanical Assessment of Glass Ionomer Cements Incorporated with Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Dental Applications
Oral 2021, 1(3), 190-198; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1030019 - 08 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 740
Abstract
Background: Nanoparticles such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes present resistance, resilience and biocompatibility with human tissues and could be incorporated into glass ionomer cement materials to improve their characteristics. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of multi-walled carbon [...] Read more.
Background: Nanoparticles such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes present resistance, resilience and biocompatibility with human tissues and could be incorporated into glass ionomer cement materials to improve their characteristics. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) incorporation on different glass ionomer cements’ compressive (σc) and diametral tensile strengths (σt). Methods: Eighty (80) specimens were divided into four groups (N = 20/gr) according to the glass ionomer cement type (conventional and high-viscosity) and the presence or absence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Samples were kept in water for 24 h prior to the tests. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p = 0.05). Results: For both σc (p = 0.1739) and σt (p = 0.2183), the glass ionomer cements’ viscosity did not influence the results. The presence of MWCNTs decreased the mean compressive strength values (p = 0.0001) and increased the diametral tensile strength (p = 0.0059). For both conventional and high-viscosity glass ionomer cements, the compressive strength values were higher than the tensile strength data. Conclusions: Regardless of the cement viscosity, the multi-walled carbon nanotube incorporation reduced the compressive strength and increased the tensile strength values. Full article
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Communication
Influence of Cement Thickness on the Polymerization Shrinkage Stress of Adhesively Cemented Composite Inlays: Photoelastic and Finite Element Analysis
Oral 2021, 1(2), 168-180; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1020017 - 21 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 721
Abstract
The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of cement thickness on the strain and stresses resulting from the polymerization of resin cement using photoelasticity and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For this study, twenty upper first premolars with inlay cavity preparation [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of cement thickness on the strain and stresses resulting from the polymerization of resin cement using photoelasticity and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For this study, twenty upper first premolars with inlay cavity preparation were constructed from photoelastic resin and restored with composite resin inlay. The samples were divided into two groups (n = 10) according to the film thickness of resin cement material. For Group 1, the film thickness was 100 μm; for Group 2, the film thickness was 400 μm. After polymerization of the cement, photoelastic analysis and finite element analysis (FEA) were performed. In the photoelastic analysis, Group 2 showed higher strain with the presence of second-order fringe even after 24 h. In Group 1, the formation of first order fringes was not observed, even after 24 h. In the FEA analysis, the greatest cusp deflection and tensile stress occurred in Group 2 (0.00026 mm and 0.305 MPa, respectively) due to the polymerization shrinkage in the lingual cusp compared to Group 1 (0.000107 mm and 0.210 MPa, respectively). It can be concluded that the thickness of the resin cement influences the cusp deflection, with the greater thickness of the cement layer, the greater stresses and deformations in the tooth structure occur. Full article
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Article
Influence of Implant-Abutment Contact Surfaces and Prosthetic Screw Tightening on the Stress Concentration, Fatigue Life and Microgap Formation: A Finite Element Analysis
Oral 2021, 1(2), 88-101; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1020009 - 19 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 765
Abstract
The purpose of this in silico study was to investigate the effect of abutment screw torque and implant-abutment contact surfaces on the stress generation, microgap formation and simulated fatigue life of an external hexagon connection under oblique loading. Three-dimensional numerical models of the [...] Read more.
The purpose of this in silico study was to investigate the effect of abutment screw torque and implant-abutment contact surfaces on the stress generation, microgap formation and simulated fatigue life of an external hexagon connection under oblique loading. Three-dimensional numerical models of the external hexagon implant were modeled containing two different implant-abutment contact surfaces (with and without contacting the hexagon axial walls) as well as using screw torques of 20 Ncm or 30 Ncm. Following the ISO 14801, an oblique load of 100 N was applied to the prosthesis. The von Mises stress, microgap formation, safety factor and fatigue life were obtained. The stresses in the abutment screw and implant were minimally influenced by the screw torque. However, this minimal stress in the screw with a 30 Ncm torque reduced the calculated fatigue life in comparison with 20 Ncm when the external hexagon axial walls were not in contact at the implant-abutment interface. The safety factor for the implant was higher when using minimal surfaces at the abutment-interfaces; however, it compromised the screw safety factor increasing its failure probability. The higher the screw torque, the lower was the microgap formation at the implant-abutment interface. However, the calculated residual stress is proportional to the applied torque, reducing the fatigue life in the screw. This effect can be attenuated using an implant-abutment system with more contacting surfaces. Full article
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Article
Bulk-Fill Direct Restorative Materials: An In Vitro Assessment of Their Physio-Mechanical Properties
Oral 2021, 1(2), 75-87; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral1020008 - 12 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 739
Abstract
Bulk-fill restorative material has gained popularity in clinical practice, due to their perceived timesaving aspect. Objective was to compare the properties of bulk-fill direct restorative materials. Filtek Z350 (CR), Filtek One Bulk Fill Restorative (BF), Fuji IX and EQUIA Forte (EF) were compared. [...] Read more.
Bulk-fill restorative material has gained popularity in clinical practice, due to their perceived timesaving aspect. Objective was to compare the properties of bulk-fill direct restorative materials. Filtek Z350 (CR), Filtek One Bulk Fill Restorative (BF), Fuji IX and EQUIA Forte (EF) were compared. Thirty specimens from each material were prepared according to ISO 4049 for three-point flexural strength. Elastic moduli and hardness (n = 20) were evaluated using nanoindentation. Depth of cure (DC) (n = 20) was measured for BF at three different depths (2, 3, 4 mm) and at two irradiation times (20 and 40 s). Wear testing was carried out for three different periods (3, 6, 12 month(s)). All specimens were stored in 37 °C water for 24 h prior to testing. Results were evaluated using one-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc Bonferroni test (p < 0.05). BF and CR showed a significantly higher flexural strength than other groups (p < 0.05), and the highest Weibull modulus was found in CR. BF showed sufficient DC with at least 85%, at all thicknesses. CR and BF also had a high level of translucency than EF and Fuji IX. Significant differences in flexural strength were found among all materials except between Fuji IX and EF. While all material tested are suitable for use clinically, BF and CR have superior properties than GIC based bulk-fill. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

 
Influence of cement thickness in the polymerization shrinkage stress during composite inlays adhesive cementation: Photoelasticity and Finite Elements Analysis
Alexandre Luiz Souto Borges,  Larissa Mendes Campaner, Alana Barbosa Alves Pinto, Tarcísio José de Arruda Paes-Junior, Clovis Pagani
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