Special Issue "The Impact of Micronutrients on the Clinical Condition of Chronic Disease"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (19 February 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria Perticone
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University Magna Græcia, Catanzaro 88100, Italy
Interests: obesity; type-2 diabetes; metabolic syndrome; endothelial dysfunction; hypertension; target organ damage
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Angela Sciacqua

Guest Editor
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences; Magna Græcia University; Catanzaro; Italy
Interests: renal function; chronic kidney disease; Type 2 Diabetes; Vitamin K

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Micronutrients are essential trace elements and vitamins involved in the maintenance of tissue function as well as in the metabolic functions of the whole body. An adequate intake is therefore necessary, even if the provision of excess supplements in people who do not need them may be harmful. Growing evidence indicates that supplementation with different micronutrients may be useful in the treatment and prevention of several clinical conditions in select groups of patients. Although moderate-to-severe deficiency states of single micronutrients can be easily recognized and treated, subclinical deficiency—often of multiple micronutrients—is difficult to detect. Consequently, clinical benefit is most probable in severely depleted patients, and is unlikely in subjects with mild deficiency.

The aim of this Special Issue is to update knowledge on the role of micronutrients in human health and of their supplementation in the prevention and treatment of chronic clinical conditions (i.e., obesity, COPD, type 2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease, osteoarthrosis, etc.) and/or in particular settings of subjects (children, older adults).

Dr. Maria Perticone
Prof. Dr. Angela Sciacqua
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Micronutrients
  • Supplementation
  • Disease Prevention
  • Food
  • Chronic Diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Upregulation of Vitamin C Transporter Functional Expression in 5xFAD Mouse Intestine
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 617; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020617 - 14 Feb 2021
Abstract
The process of obtaining ascorbic acid (AA) via intestinal absorption and blood circulation is carrier-mediated utilizing the AA transporters SVCT1 and SVCT2, which are expressed in the intestine and brain (SVCT2 in abundance). AA concentration is decreased in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but information [...] Read more.
The process of obtaining ascorbic acid (AA) via intestinal absorption and blood circulation is carrier-mediated utilizing the AA transporters SVCT1 and SVCT2, which are expressed in the intestine and brain (SVCT2 in abundance). AA concentration is decreased in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but information regarding the status of intestinal AA uptake in the AD is still lacking. We aimed here to understand how AA homeostasis is modulated in a transgenic mouse model (5xFAD) of AD. AA levels in serum from 5xFAD mice were markedly lower than controls. Expression of oxidative stress response genes (glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1)) were significantly increased in AD mice jejunum, and this increase was mitigated by AA supplementation. Uptake of AA in the jejunum was upregulated. This increased AA transport was caused by a marked increase in SVCT1 and SVCT2 protein, mRNA, and heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) expression. A significant increase in the expression of HNF1α and specific protein 1 (Sp1), which drive SLC23A1 and SLC23A2 promoter activity, respectively, was observed. Expression of hSVCT interacting proteins GRHPR and CLSTN3 were also increased. SVCT2 protein and mRNA expression in the hippocampus of 5xFAD mice was not altered. Together, these investigations reveal adaptive up-regulation of intestinal AA uptake in the 5xFAD mouse model. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Do Only Calcium and Vitamin D Matter? Micronutrients in the Diet of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Patients and the Risk of Osteoporosis
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 525; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020525 - 05 Feb 2021
Abstract
Osteoporosis is one of the most common extraintestinal complications among patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases. The role of vitamin D and calcium in the prevention of a decreased bone mineral density is well known, although other nutrients, including micronutrients, are also of [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is one of the most common extraintestinal complications among patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases. The role of vitamin D and calcium in the prevention of a decreased bone mineral density is well known, although other nutrients, including micronutrients, are also of extreme importance. Despite the fact that zinc, copper, selenium, iron, cadmium, silicon and fluorine have not been frequently discussed with regard to the prevention of osteoporosis, it is possible that a deficiency or excess of the abovementioned elements may affect bone mineralization. Additionally, the risk of malnutrition, which is common in patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, as well as the composition of gut microbiota, may be associated with micronutrients status. Full article
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