Special Issue "FoodOmics 2020"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Alessandra Bordoni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agro-Food Sciences and Technologies (DISTAL), University of Bologna, piazza Goidanich, 60, 47521 Cesena (FC), Italy
Interests: human nutrition; nutritional biochemistry; fatty acids; in vitro digestion; bioavailability; nutrigenomics; bioactive compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Francesco Capozzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna - Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences
Interests: foodomics; biomarkers; metabolomics; NMR spectroscopy; food structure; in vitro digestion modelling; food kinetics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 6th edition of the International Conference on FoodOmics will be held in Cesena (Italy) on 14–16 October 2020. Foodomics was defined in 2009 as “a discipline that studies the Food and Nutrition domains through the application and integration of advanced -omics technologies to improve consumer's well-being, health, and knowledge”. The study of foodomics came under the spotlight after it was introduced at the first international conference in 2009 in Cesena, Italy. Since 2009, many experts have been meeting regularly to find new approaches and possibilities in the areas of food science and technology and human nutrition.

This year, the Conference focuses on four different topics:

  • Food safety, an important issue where omics technologies coupled with statistical and bioinformatics tools can offer solutions. On the one hand, the use of multi-omics technologies will improve the understanding of allergenicity, on the other it will enable the identification of food allergens. In addition, in the last several years a new approach has revolutionized traditional toxicology.  At the core of this new strategy, termed systems toxicology, are the “omics” techniques;
  • Enginomics, a cutting-edge science that harmonizes food processing and human digestion in a holistic way using new technologies for modelling and simulating the main human metabolic processes.  Exploring human digestive processes using big data and food engineering support will contribute to an improved production of food for the future.
  • Exposomics, the new science that analyses the human response to exposure to diet/lifestyle/environmental factors through innovative omics technologies. The use of omics analyses provides high-throughput exposomics datasets that can help develop an unbiased understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic diseases in the context of industrialization, drastic lifestyle changes, urbanization, and pollution.
  • Feedomics, an emerging field in animal research that, like foodomics, integrates a range of omics technologies.  This approach can help in elucidating the complex interactions among feed, environment, genetics, physiology, and the symbiotic microbiota, with the final aim of improving overall animal welfare and health, productivity, and product quality.

This Special Issue welcomes original research and reviews of literature not only by researchers that attend the meeting but also by researchers that feel they are part of the foodomics community. 

Prof. Dr. Alessandra Bordoni
Prof. Dr. Francesco Capozzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foodomics
  • human nutrition
  • food technologies
  • food safety
  • enginomics
  • in vitro digestion
  • exposomics
  • feedomics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Microbiota and Metabolite Modifications after Dietary Exclusion of Dairy Products and Reduced Consumption of Fermented Food in Young and Older Men
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1905; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061905 - 01 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1466
Abstract
The gut microbiota adapts to age-related changes in host physiology but is also affected by environmental stimuli, like diet. As a source of both pre- and probiotics, dairy and fermented foods modulate the gut microbiota composition, which makes them interesting food groups to [...] Read more.
The gut microbiota adapts to age-related changes in host physiology but is also affected by environmental stimuli, like diet. As a source of both pre- and probiotics, dairy and fermented foods modulate the gut microbiota composition, which makes them interesting food groups to use for the investigation of interactions between diet and ageing. Here we present the effects of excluding dairy products and limiting fermented food consumption for 19 days on gut microbiota composition and circulating metabolites of 28 healthy, young (YA) and older (OA) adult men. The intervention affected gut microbial composition in both groups, with significant increases in Akkermansia muciniphila and decreases in bacteria of the Clostridiales order. Lower fasting levels of glucose and insulin, as well as dairy-associated metabolites like lactose and pentadecanoic acid, were observed after the intervention, with no effect of age. The intervention also decreased HDL and LDL cholesterol levels. Dairy fat intake was positively associated with the HDL cholesterol changes but not with the LDL/HDL ratio. In conclusion, restricting the intake of dairy and fermented foods in men modified their gut microbiota and blood metabolites, while the impact of the dietary restrictions on these outcomes was more marked than the effect of age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue FoodOmics 2020)
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Article
Colonic In Vitro Model Assessment of the Prebiotic Potential of Bread Fortified with Polyphenols Rich Olive Fiber
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 787; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030787 - 27 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 945
Abstract
The use of olive pomace could represent an innovative and low-cost strategy to formulate healthier and value-added foods, and bakery products are good candidates for enrichment. In this work, we explored the prebiotic potential of bread enriched with Polyphenol Rich Fiber (PRF), a [...] Read more.
The use of olive pomace could represent an innovative and low-cost strategy to formulate healthier and value-added foods, and bakery products are good candidates for enrichment. In this work, we explored the prebiotic potential of bread enriched with Polyphenol Rich Fiber (PRF), a defatted olive pomace byproduct previously studied in the European Project H2020 EcoProlive. To this aim, after in vitro digestion, the PRF-enriched bread, its standard control, and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) underwent distal colonic fermentation using the in vitro colon model MICODE (multi-unit colon gut model). Sampling was done prior, over and after 24 h of fermentation, then metabolomic analysis by Solid Phase Micro Extraction Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (SPME GCMS), 16S-rDNA genomic sequencing of colonic microbiota by MiSeq, and absolute quantification of main bacterial species by qPCR were performed. The results indicated that PRF-enriched bread generated positive effects on the host gut model: (i) surge in eubiosis; (ii) increased abundance of beneficial bacterial groups, such as Bifidobacteriaceae and Lactobacillales; (iii) production of certain bioactive metabolites, such as low organic fatty acids; (iv) reduction in detrimental compounds, such as skatole. Our study not only evidenced the prebiotic role of PRF-enriched bread, thereby paving the road for further use of olive by-products, but also highlighted the potential of the in vitro gut model MICODE in the critical evaluation of functionality of food prototypes as modulators of the gut microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue FoodOmics 2020)
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Review

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Review
Development of Personalized Nutrition: Applications in Lactose Intolerance Diagnosis and Management
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1503; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051503 - 29 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Recent discoveries in the “omics” field and the growing focus on preventive health have opened new avenues for personalized nutrition (PN), which is becoming an important theme in the strategic plans of organizations that are active in healthcare, food, and nutrition research. PN [...] Read more.
Recent discoveries in the “omics” field and the growing focus on preventive health have opened new avenues for personalized nutrition (PN), which is becoming an important theme in the strategic plans of organizations that are active in healthcare, food, and nutrition research. PN holds great potential for individual health optimization, disease management, public health interventions, and product innovation. However, there are still multiple challenges to overcome before PN can be truly embraced by the public and healthcare stakeholders. The diagnosis and management of lactose intolerance (LI), a common condition with a strong inter-individual component, is explored as an interesting example for the potential role of these technologies and the challenges of PN. From the development of genetic and metabolomic LI diagnostic tests that can be carried out in the home, to advances in the understanding of LI pathology and individualized treatment optimization, PN in LI care has shown substantial progress. However, there are still many research gaps to address, including the understanding of epigenetic regulation of lactase expression and how lactose is metabolized by the gut microbiota, in order to achieve better LI detection and effective therapeutic interventions to reverse the potential health consequences of LI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue FoodOmics 2020)
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