Special Issue "The Impact of Policy and Food Environment on Food Purchase and Dietary Behavior"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Policies and Education for Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ruopeng An
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Brown School, Washington University, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
Interests: dietary behavior; public health nutrition; physical activity; obesity; diabetes; cognitive health; food environment; built environment; cost–benefit analysis; cost-effectiveness analysis; microsimulation; machine learning; policy analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Healthy eating is a key health promotion and disease prevention strategy. Worldwide, malnutrition remains a leading risk factor for morbidity and mortality. Preliminary evidence reveals the potential of public policies (healthy food subsidy, soda or fat tax, sugar-sweetened beverage labels, chain restaurant menu labeling, school competitive food laws, to name a few) and modifications of the local food or built environment in nudging people towards a healthier diet. Those interventions are highly scalable, address a large population, and are often cost-effective relative to personalized, small-scale, intensive clinical trials. On the other hand, not all policies or food environments are born equal. Different policies and food environments affect people’s food purchasing and dietary patterns differently (including the direction and magnitude of the effects, their cost–benefit portfolio, and unintended consequences). Moreover, even the same policy and food environment may exert differential impacts on population subgroups, which either reduces or reinforces health disparities and social inequities. This Special Issue calls for studies that assess the impact of policy and food environment on food/beverage purchase and dietary behavior worldwide. Both policy and food environment are broadly defined, including but not limited to public policies at the national, state, or local levels; and both physical (e.g., built) and nonphysical (e.g., price) environments. Both original studies (e.g., empirical analyses, modeling studies) and review articles (e.g., systematic reviews and meta-analyses) will be considered. The overarching goal of this Special Issue is to create a critical mass that substantiates the scientific evidence on the role of policy and food environment in influencing people’s food purchase and consumption patterns, which may shed light on future population-level interventions that promote a healthy diet and reduce social inequity.

Dr. Ruopeng An
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • policy
  • environment
  • food purchase
  • food consumption
  • diet

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
The Impact of the National Nutrition Program 2017–2030 on People’s Food Purchases: A Revenue-Based Perspective
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3030; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093030 - 30 Aug 2021
Viewed by 464
Abstract
The General Office of the State Council of China promulgated the National Nutrition Program 2017–2030 in 2017 to guide the people to improve their food supply and nutritional intake. This study uses qualitative and quantitative information which are analyzed to estimate the change [...] Read more.
The General Office of the State Council of China promulgated the National Nutrition Program 2017–2030 in 2017 to guide the people to improve their food supply and nutritional intake. This study uses qualitative and quantitative information which are analyzed to estimate the change in people’s food purchases following the implementation of the National Nutrition Program 2017–2030, and puts forward measures that should be taken by the competent authorities and stakeholders. We use the translog revenue function of the food industry, and based on the data of listed companies of Chinese food enterprises from 2015 to 2020, and this study find that the National Nutrition Program 2017–2030 has had a positive impact on people’s food purchases, and the impact is more obvious in people’s food purchases from large food manufacturers. Finally, we also provide regulators with public policy implications, and provide food manufacturers with development suggestions. Full article
Article
Healthy Eating Index-2015 Scores Vary by Types of Food Outlets in the United States
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2717; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082717 - 07 Aug 2021
Viewed by 890
Abstract
Diet quality in the United States is improving over time but remains poor. Food outlets influence diet quality and represent the environments in which individuals make choices about food purchases and intake. The objective of this study was to use the Healthy Eating [...] Read more.
Diet quality in the United States is improving over time but remains poor. Food outlets influence diet quality and represent the environments in which individuals make choices about food purchases and intake. The objective of this study was to use the Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) to evaluate the quality of foods consumed from the four major outlets where food is obtained—stores, full-service restaurants, quick-services restaurants, and schools—and to assess changes over time. This cross-sectional study used 24 h dietary recall data from eight cycles (2003–2004 to 2017–2018) of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Linear trend estimation was used to test for changes in HEI scores over time, and balanced repeated replicate weighted linear regression was used to test for differences in total and component scores between types of food outlets. Overall, Americans are not consuming a mix of foods from any major category of food outlet that aligns with dietary guidelines. The total score for schools (65/100 points) and stores (62/100 points) was significantly higher than full-service (51/100 points) and quick-service (39/100 points) restaurants (p < 0.0001). HEI scores significantly improved over time for schools (p < 0.001), including an increase in whole grains from less than 1 point in 2003–2004 to 7 out of 10 points in 2017–2018. In 2017–2018, schools received the maximum score for total fruits, whole fruits, and dairy. Continued research on strategies for improving the quality of foods consumed from restaurants and stores is warranted. Full article
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Article
Food Waste and Its Association with Diet Quality of Foods Purchased in South Florida
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2535; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082535 - 24 Jul 2021
Viewed by 598
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore the associations between food waste and the diet quality of foods purchased and with grocery purchasing behaviors. This was a cross-sectional study among 109 primary household food providers conducting primary shopping. Participants were recruited outside [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to explore the associations between food waste and the diet quality of foods purchased and with grocery purchasing behaviors. This was a cross-sectional study among 109 primary household food providers conducting primary shopping. Participants were recruited outside of local grocery stores and were asked to complete a survey assessing amounts of avoidable food waste and grocery purchasing behaviors. The diet quality of the foods purchased was assessed from grocery receipts using the Grocery Purchase Quality Index-2016 (GPQI-2016). Variables were associated using linear regression, analysis of covariance, and point biserial correlations. We found that fresh fruits (63%) and leafy greens (70%) were the foods that were the most wasted. The GPQI-2016 total score was significantly inversely associated with the total amount of food wasted (β  =  −0.63; 95% CI: −1.14,−0.12) after adjusting for important confounders. The reason “food past the date printed on the package” was directly correlated with food wasted (r = 0.40; p < 0.01) but inversely correlated with GPQI-2016 score (r = −0.21; p = 0.04). Food wasted, but not the GPQI-2016 score, was significantly higher among those who grocery shop 2–4 times per week compared to 1 time every 1–2 weeks (p = 0.02). In conclusion, food waste is inversely associated with diet quality and directly associated with grocery purchasing frequency. Full article
Article
Menu Engineering and Dietary Behavior Impact on Young Adults’ Kilocalorie Choice
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2329; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072329 - 07 Jul 2021
Viewed by 652
Abstract
The obesity pandemic is associated with increased consumption of restaurant food. Labeling of menus is an intervention used to provide consumers with kilocalorie (calorie) information in hopes of them making healthier food choices. This study evaluated the relationship between young adults’ calorie choices [...] Read more.
The obesity pandemic is associated with increased consumption of restaurant food. Labeling of menus is an intervention used to provide consumers with kilocalorie (calorie) information in hopes of them making healthier food choices. This study evaluated the relationship between young adults’ calorie choices on restaurant menus and menu design, dietary behaviors, and demographic characteristics. A 3 (fast-casual restaurants) × 4 (menu-designs based on menu engineering theories) between-subjects (n = 480, 18–24-year olds) experimental design was used. The relationship between the participants’ calorie choices (high versus low) and menu design, stage of change, gender, race, educational level and weight status was evaluated using logistic regression. All independent variables had at least one category that had greater odds (CI 95% ± 5%) of subjects choosing a lower calorie entree, except education level and race/ethnic group. Normal weight and overweight subjects had greater odds of choosing lower calorie entrees than those that were obese. In addition, subjects that had started to control their calorie intake for less than six months or had sustained this change for at least six months, had greater odds of choosing lower calorie entrees compared to others. Including a green symbol and calories on fast casual restaurant menus may influence some young adults to choose lower calorie entrees. Full article
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