Special Issue "Nuts Intake and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giuseppina Mandalari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Science, University of Messina, Viale SS, Annunziata, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: bioaccessibility; gut microbiota; antimicrobial; functional foods; in vitro digestion; clinical microbiology; food microbiology
Dr. Terri Grassby
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Surrey, Dorothy Hodgkin Building, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK
Interests: food science; plant polysaccharides; dietary fibre; bioaccessibility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrients is planning a Special Issue focusing on nut intake and human health, which will include research on all aspects of nut intake and effects on human health, including cardiometabolic health (heart disease, type 2 diabetes) and gut health (prebiotics, cancer prevention). We invite you to submit your latest research to this Special Issue.
With the increasing popularity of plant-based diets, understanding the health effects of nut consumption has never been so important.
All types of study will be considered where nuts are a key component of the analysis/intervention, including intervention trials, epidemiological studies, in vitro studies and metanalyses. All nuts (tree and ground nuts) whether individually, in combination or as significant components of a dietary intervention will be eligible for inclusion. Studies on the digestion and bioavailability of nutrients and phytochemicals, energy metabolism, appetite, satiety and obesity from nuts are also welcome.

Dr. Giuseppina Mandalari
Dr. Terri Grassby
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nuts
  • Human nutrition
  • Health effects
  • Digestion and fermentation
  • Food structure
  • Microbiome
  • Cognition
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Heart disease
  • Phytonutrients

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Antimicrobial and Antiviral Activity of Polyphenols from Almond (Prunus dulcis L.) Skin
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2355; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102355 - 03 Oct 2019
Abstract
Due to their antimicrobial and antiviral activity potential in vitro, polyphenols are gaining a lot of attention from the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries. A novel antiviral and antimicrobial approach could be based on the use of polyphenols obtained from natural sources. Here, we [...] Read more.
Due to their antimicrobial and antiviral activity potential in vitro, polyphenols are gaining a lot of attention from the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries. A novel antiviral and antimicrobial approach could be based on the use of polyphenols obtained from natural sources. Here, we tested the antibacterial and antiviral effect of a mix of polyphenols present in natural almond skin (NS MIX). The antimicrobial potential was evaluated against the standard American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strains, by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Herpes simplex virus type I was used for the antiviral assessment of NS MIX by plaque assay. Furthermore, we evaluated the expression of viral cascade antigens. NS MIX exhibited antimicrobial (MIC values of 0.31–1.25 mg/ml) and antiviral activity (decrease in the viral titer ** p < 0.01, and viral DNA accumulation * p < 0.05) against Staphylococcus aureus and HSV-1, respectively. Amongst the isolated compounds, the aglycones epicatechin and catechin showed the greatest activity against S. aureus ATCC 6538P (MIC values of 0.078–0.15 and 0.15 mg/ml, respectively), but were not active against all the other strains. These results could be used to develop novel products for topical use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuts Intake and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Chemical Composition and In Vitro Bioaccessibility of Antioxidant Phytochemicals from Selected Edible Nuts
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2303; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102303 - 27 Sep 2019
Abstract
The ultimate health benefits of peanuts and tree nuts partially depend on the effective gastrointestinal delivery of their phytochemicals. The chemical composition and in vitro bioaccessibility of tocopherols, tocotrienols and phenolic compounds from peanuts and seven tree nuts were evaluated by analytical and [...] Read more.
The ultimate health benefits of peanuts and tree nuts partially depend on the effective gastrointestinal delivery of their phytochemicals. The chemical composition and in vitro bioaccessibility of tocopherols, tocotrienols and phenolic compounds from peanuts and seven tree nuts were evaluated by analytical and chemometric methods. Total fat and dietary fiber (g 100 g−1) ranged from 34.2 (Emory oak acorn) to 72.5 (pink pine nut; PPN) and from 1.2 (PPN) to 22.5 (pistachio). Samples were rich in oleic and linoleic acids (56–87 g 100 g−1 oil). Tocopherols and tocotrienols (mg·kg−1) ranged from 48.1 (peanut) to 156.3 (almond) and 0 (almond, pecan) to 22.1 (PPN) and hydrophilic phenolics from 533 (PPN) to 12,896 (Emory oak acorn); flavonoids and condensed tannins (mg CE.100 g−1) ranged from 142 (white pine nut) to 1833 (Emory oak acorn) and 14 (PPN) to 460 (Emory oak acorn). Three principal components explained 90% of the variance associated with the diversity of antioxidant phytochemicals in samples. In vitro bioaccessibility of tocopherols, tocotrienols, hydrophilic phenolics, flavonoids, and condensed tannins ranged from 11–51%, 16–79%, 25–55%, 0–100%, and 0–94%, respectively. Multiple regression analyses revealed a potential influence of dietary fiber, fats and/or unsaturated fatty acids on phytochemical bioaccessibility, in a structure-specific manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuts Intake and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Baru Almonds Increase the Activity of Glutathione Peroxidase in Overweight and Obese Women: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1750; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081750 - 30 Jul 2019
Abstract
Background: Obesity-induced inflammation is frequently associated with higher oxidative stress. In vitro and experimental studies have considered baru almonds (Dipteryx alata Vog) as a legume seed with high antioxidant capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether baru almonds are capable [...] Read more.
Background: Obesity-induced inflammation is frequently associated with higher oxidative stress. In vitro and experimental studies have considered baru almonds (Dipteryx alata Vog) as a legume seed with high antioxidant capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether baru almonds are capable of improving the inflammatory and antioxidant status in overweight and obese women. Methods: In a parallel-arm, randomized placebo-controlled trial, 46 overweight and obese women (age: 40 ± 11 years; body mass index: 33.3 ± 4.3) were randomly assigned to receive advice to follow a normocaloric and isoenergetic diet with placebo (PLA, n = 22) or similar advice plus 20 g baru almonds (BARU, n = 24) for 8 wk. Malondialdehyde (MDA), adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase—CAT; glutathione peroxidase—GPx; superoxide dismutase—SOD), and minerals were analyzed in plasma samples. Results: At baseline, groups were similar regarding the body composition, oxidative, and inflammatory parameters. The BARU group increased the activity of GPx (+0.08 U/mg, 95%CI + 0.05 to +0.12 vs. −0.07, 95%CI −0.12 to −0.03, p < 0.01) and plasma copper concentration (p = 0.037) when compared to the PLA group. No differences were observed between groups in CAT and SOD activity or MDA and cytokines concentrations. Conclusions: Baru almond supplementation increased the GPx activity in overweight and obese women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuts Intake and Human Health)
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