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Special Issue "Nutritional Genomics"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. M. Luisa Bonet

Laboratori de Biologia Molecular, Nutrició i Biotecnologia (LBNB), Universitat de les Illes Balears (UIB), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERobn) and Fundació Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Illes Balears (IdISBa). Campus de la UIB (Edifici Mateu Orfila). Carretera de Valldemossa Km 7,5 Palma de Mallorca 07122. Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Obesity, vitamin A, carotenoids, metabolic programming, nutrigenomics
Guest Editor
Dr. Juana Sánchez

Nutrigenomic and Obesity Research Group, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Nutrition and Biotechnology (LBNB), University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Obesity; leptin; perinatal nutrition, metabolic programming; transcriptome-based biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

After the sequencing of the human genome and that of model organisms, nutritional genomics is becoming an essential part of modern nutrition science. Nutritional genomics applies non-hypothesis-driven, high-throughput methodologies and systems biology approaches to study the relationship between the genome, nutrition, and health. It seeks to define biomarkers, biological targets and the mechanisms of action of dietary factors, both in health and disease states, particularly diet-related complex diseases such as obesity. Its scope is extending as this young science develops, from single dietary chemicals/foods to complete diets; from a focus on genetic traits, to the consideration of additional individual’s traits affecting responses to diet, such as epigenetics and microbiota profiles; from a focus on protein coding genes, to the consideration of non-coding RNAs as well, in view of their role in the control of metabolism and evidence for their dietary regulation. Besides classical nutriomics (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics), the influence of nutrition and dietary factors on transcription factor occupancy and chromatin structure can now be studied at a genome-wide level. The development of nutritional genomics is extending our understanding of biology and allowing the definition of personalized dietary recommendations for health preservation. We expect these different aspects to be covered in this special issue of Nutrients on “Nutritional genomics”.

Prof. Dr. M. Luisa Bonet
Dr. Juana Sánchez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutriomics
  • Nutrigenomics
  • Nutriepigenomics
  • Nutrigenetics
  • Nutrition and miRNAs
  • Personalised nutrition
  • Biomarkers and nutrition

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Vitamin D Receptor Genetic Variation and Cancer Biomarkers among Breast Cancer Patients Supplemented with Vitamin D3: A Single-Arm Non-Randomized Before and After Trial
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1264; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061264
Received: 21 April 2019 / Revised: 28 May 2019 / Accepted: 30 May 2019 / Published: 4 June 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (930 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We investigated whether vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms were associated with cancer biomarkers, i.e., E-cadherin, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), interferon β (IFNβ), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (s-VCAM-1), tumor necrosis factorα (TNFα), interleukin 6 (IL6), plasminogen [...] Read more.
We investigated whether vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms were associated with cancer biomarkers, i.e., E-cadherin, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), interferon β (IFNβ), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (s-VCAM-1), tumor necrosis factorα (TNFα), interleukin 6 (IL6), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1), and human high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), among breast cancer survivors who received vitamin D3 supplementation. In a single-arm non-randomized pre- and post trial, 176 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment protocol including surgery, radio and chemotherapy were enrolled in the study and received 4000 IU of vitamin D3 daily for 12 weeks. The association between the VDR SNPs (ApaI, TaqI, FokI, BsmI and Cdx2) and response variable changes was assessed using linear regression, utilizing the “association” function in the R package “SNPassoc”. We observed that women with AA and GA [codominant model (AA compared to GG) and (GA compared to GG); dominant model (AA & GA compared to GG)] genotypes of Cdx2 showed higher increase in plasma MMP9 levels compared to the GG category. In addition, carriers of BsmI bb showed greater decrease in circulating TNFα levels after vitamin D3 supplementation [recessive model (bb compared to BB & Bb]. Likewise, significant associations were identified between haplotypes of VDR polymorphisms and on-study plasma MMP9 changes. However, our results indicate that VDR genetic polymorphisms were not associated with longitudinal changes in the remaining cancer biomarkers. Overall, our findings suggest that changes in certain inflammatory biomarkers in breast cancer survivors with low plasma 25(OH)D levels, supplemented with vitamin D3, may depend on VDR SNPs and haplotypes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Genomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Genetic Risk Score Predictive of the Plasma Triglyceride Response to an Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation in a Mexican Population
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 737; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040737
Received: 1 March 2019 / Revised: 26 March 2019 / Accepted: 28 March 2019 / Published: 29 March 2019
PDF Full-text (572 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Our group built a genetic risk score (GRS) of the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to an omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid (FA) supplementation in Caucasian Canadians that explained 21.53% of the TG variance. The objective was to refine the GRS by fine mapping and [...] Read more.
Our group built a genetic risk score (GRS) of the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to an omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid (FA) supplementation in Caucasian Canadians that explained 21.53% of the TG variance. The objective was to refine the GRS by fine mapping and to test its association with the TG response in young Mexican adults. A total of 191 participants underwent a 6-week n-3 FA supplementation providing 2.7g/day of docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 103 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. A stepwise regression adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) was used to select the strongest SNPs to include in the genetic risk model. A GRS was calculated from the sum of at-risk alleles. The contribution of the GRS to the TG response was assessed by ANCOVA with age, sex, and BMI included in the model. Several differences in allele frequency were observed between Canadians and Mexicans. Five lead SNPs were included in the genetic risk model, in which the GRS accounted for 11.01% of the variance of the TG response (p < 0.0001). These findings highlight the important contribution of genetic factors to the heterogeneity of the TG response to an n-3 FA supplementation among Mexicans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Genomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Physiological and Transcriptional Responses in Weaned Piglets Fed Diets with Varying Phosphorus and Calcium Levels
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 436; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020436
Received: 23 January 2019 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
PDF Full-text (2035 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Phosphorus (P) is an important element of various metabolic and signalling processes, including bone metabolism and immune function. To elucidate the routes of P homeostasis and utilization, a five-week feeding study was conducted with weaned piglets receiving a diet with recommended amounts of [...] Read more.
Phosphorus (P) is an important element of various metabolic and signalling processes, including bone metabolism and immune function. To elucidate the routes of P homeostasis and utilization, a five-week feeding study was conducted with weaned piglets receiving a diet with recommended amounts of P and Ca (M), or a diet with lower (L) or higher (H) P values and a constant Ca:P ratio. Routes of P utilization were deduced via bone characteristics (MicroCT), genome-wide transcriptomic profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and serum mineral levels. MicroCT revealed significantly lower bone mineral density, trabecular number, and mechanical fracture load in (L). Gene expression analyses showed transcripts of 276 and 115 annotated genes with higher or lower abundance in (H) than (L) that were related to basic cellular and metabolic processes as well as response to stimuli, developmental processes and immune system processes. This study shows the many molecular routes involved in P homeostasis that should be considered to improve endogenous mechanisms of P utilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Genomics)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Biomarkers of Nutrition and Health: New Tools for New Approaches
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1092; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051092
Received: 4 April 2019 / Revised: 7 May 2019 / Accepted: 8 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
PDF Full-text (746 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A main challenge in nutritional studies is the valid and reliable assessment of food intake, as well as its effects on the body. Generally, food intake measurement is based on self-reported dietary intake questionnaires, which have inherent limitations. They can be overcome by [...] Read more.
A main challenge in nutritional studies is the valid and reliable assessment of food intake, as well as its effects on the body. Generally, food intake measurement is based on self-reported dietary intake questionnaires, which have inherent limitations. They can be overcome by the use of biomarkers, capable of objectively assessing food consumption without the bias of self-reported dietary assessment. Another major goal is to determine the biological effects of foods and their impact on health. Systems analysis of dynamic responses may help to identify biomarkers indicative of intake and effects on the body at the same time, possibly in relation to individuals’ health/disease states. Such biomarkers could be used to quantify intake and validate intake questionnaires, analyse physiological or pathological responses to certain food components or diets, identify persons with specific dietary deficiency, provide information on inter-individual variations or help to formulate personalized dietary recommendations to achieve optimal health for particular phenotypes, currently referred as “precision nutrition.” In this regard, holistic approaches using global analysis methods (omics approaches), capable of gathering high amounts of data, appear to be very useful to identify new biomarkers and to enhance our understanding of the role of food in health and disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Genomics)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Author: Jaap Keijer
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Title:
Mitochondrial gene expression responses to nutrient interventions

Author: Lluis Arola and Antoni Caimari
Affiliation:
Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain
Title:
Epigenome-wide association studies for revealing new relationships between epigenetics and nutrition

Author: Alfredo Martínez and Fermín Milagro
Affiliation:
Universidad de Navarra, Spain
Title:
Nutrigenetics/ miRNA and nutrition

Author: Catalina Picó and Francisca Serra and Andreu Palou
Affiliation:
Universitat de les Illes Balears
Title:
Omics-derived biomarkers

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