Special Issue "Diet, Lifestyle and Healthy Ageing"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Siân Robinson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
AGE Research Group, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, UK
Interests: nutrition; ageing; lifestyle; inequalities; sarcopenia
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ailsa Welch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Population Health and Primary Care, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
Interests: Nutrition and musculoskeletal health (osteoporosis; fractures; sarcopenia & age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function); dietary methodology; public health nutrition
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As increases in healthy life expectancy have not kept pace with improvements in life expectancy, today’s older adults may face greater time spent in poor health, with greater likelihood of having multiple chronic and complex health conditions and disability. Recognition of the challenges that ageing populations face has focused attention on health trajectories in later life. Understanding the determinants of differences in the rate and pace of ageing across the population will be central both to the provision of effective support to promote health and to help to maintain independence in older age, as well as predicting the healthcare needs of older people in the future. Lifestyle factors (diet, physical activity, sleep, smoking, alcohol) are known determinants of health, and may also be key influences on healthy ageing.

This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled "Diet, Lifestyle and Healthy Ageing", welcomes the submission of manuscripts describing either original research or systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Potential topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • influences on diet and lifestyle in older age: psychosocial and age-related factors;
  • diet, lifestyle and retirement transition;
  • inequalities in diet and lifestyle among older populations;
  • diet, lifestyle and healthy ageing;
  • systematic reviews and meta-analyses of studies of diet, lifestyle and health outcomes in older age; and
  • systematic reviews and meta-analyses of interventions to support diet and lifestyle in older populations.

Prof. Dr. Siân Robinson
Prof. Dr. Ailsa Welch
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diet
  • lifestyle
  • ageing
  • health

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Calanus Oil Supplementation and 16 Week Exercise Program on Selected Fitness Parameters in Older Women
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020481 (registering DOI) - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
We investigated changes in functional fitness after an exercise program in combination with Calanus oil supplementation, a novel source of bioactive lipids rich in wax esters with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA). Fifty-five healthy sedentary women aged 65–80 (mean age 70.9 ± [...] Read more.
We investigated changes in functional fitness after an exercise program in combination with Calanus oil supplementation, a novel source of bioactive lipids rich in wax esters with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA). Fifty-five healthy sedentary women aged 65–80 (mean age 70.9 ± 3.9 years, BMI 27.24 ± 3.9 kg m−2, VO2peak 19.46 ± 3.7 ml kg−1 min−1) were enrolled in the study. The participants were divided into two groups: exercise training plus Calanus Oil supplementation (n = 28) or exercise plus placebo (sunflower oil) supplementation (n = 27). The exercise intervention program was completed by 53 participants and contained functional circuit training (twice a week, 45 min plus 15 min of stretching and balance training) and Nordic walking (once a week, 60 min) for 16 weeks. Senior fitness test, exercise stress test on bicycle ergometer, hand-grip, and body composition were evaluated before and after the program. Our results show that functional fitness and body composition improved following the interventional exercise program, but for most of the parameters there was no synergic effect of supplementing n-3 PUFA-rich Calanus oil. In comparison to the placebo group, the group with Calanus supplementation experienced significantly higher improvement of functional strength of lower body which was evaluated by the chair stand test. Supplementation with Calanus may have a synergic effect with exercise on functional strength of the lower body in the elderly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Lifestyle and Healthy Ageing)
Open AccessArticle
Independent and Joint Associations of Physical Activity and Dietary Behavior with Older Adults’ Lower Limb Strength
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020443 - 10 Feb 2020
Abstract
Studies have indicated that sufficient physical activity levels and balanced dietary behavior are independently related to physical function in older populations; however, their joint association with physical function remain unclear. This study examined the independent and combined associations of sufficient physical activity and [...] Read more.
Studies have indicated that sufficient physical activity levels and balanced dietary behavior are independently related to physical function in older populations; however, their joint association with physical function remain unclear. This study examined the independent and combined associations of sufficient physical activity and balanced selection of foods with lower limb strength among 122 older Taiwanese adults living in community (mean age: 69.9 ± 5.0 years). The assessments included accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and self-reported selection of foods. Lower limb strength performance was measured using the five times sit-to-stand test. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the associations in question before and after adjusting for potential confounders. The results showed that in the adjusted model, lower limb strength had no significant independent association with either meeting the recommended level of MVPA or balanced selection of foods. Compared to older adults who neither met the recommended MVPA level nor reported a balanced selection of foods, those who conformed to both these criteria were more likely to have better lower limb strength (odds ratio = 6.28, 95% confidence interval = 1.36–29.01) after adjusting for covariates. Health promotion initiatives addressing disability prevention for older adults need to consider promoting both MVPA and food selection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Lifestyle and Healthy Ageing)
Open AccessArticle
Comparison of the Acute Postprandial Circulating B-Vitamin and Vitamer Responses to Single Breakfast Meals in Young and Older Individuals: Preliminary Secondary Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2893; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122893 - 28 Nov 2019
Abstract
B-vitamin deficiency is common in ageing populations either due to altered dietary habits or altered digestive and metabolic functions. There is limited data on the acute circulating concentrations of B-vitamins and their various forms (vitamers), following ingestion of realistic meals. This study compared [...] Read more.
B-vitamin deficiency is common in ageing populations either due to altered dietary habits or altered digestive and metabolic functions. There is limited data on the acute circulating concentrations of B-vitamins and their various forms (vitamers), following ingestion of realistic meals. This study compared the acute circulating B-vitamin and vitamer responses to either an energy-dense (ED) or a nutrient-dense (ND) breakfast meal, consumed in a randomized cross-over sequence, in older and younger adults (n = 15 and 15, aged 67.3 ± 1.5 and 22.7 ± 0.5 years (mean ± SEM), respectively). Eleven differing B-vitamins and vitamers were determined in plasma samples by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, in the fasting and postprandial state (hourly for 5 h). While postprandial thiamine concentration increased following both meals, riboflavin increased only following a ND meal in both age groups. Many vitamins including nicotinic acid, pantothenic acid, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, pyridoxal-5’phosphate, and 4-pyridoxic acid remained unaltered, and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), nicotinamide and nicotinuric acid concentrations reduced following both meals. Biological age and food composition had minimal impact on postprandial B-vitamin concentrations, yet the differences between the ED and ND meals for riboflavin highlight the importance of riboflavin intake to achieve adequacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Lifestyle and Healthy Ageing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Association between Food Store Availability and the Incidence of Functional Disability among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results from the Japanese Gerontological Evaluation Cohort Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2369; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102369 - 04 Oct 2019
Abstract
This study sought to clarify the association between food store availability and the incidence of disability in older adults. This study utilized a population-based cohort study of independent Japanese adults aged ≥65 years, which was a 6 year follow-up of participants in the [...] Read more.
This study sought to clarify the association between food store availability and the incidence of disability in older adults. This study utilized a population-based cohort study of independent Japanese adults aged ≥65 years, which was a 6 year follow-up of participants in the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study. A total of 31,273 respondents were extracted. Food store availability was evaluated based on the existence of food stores within 500/1000 m of the home. We utilized participant-reported subjective measurement as well as geographic information system-based objective measurement for the evaluation. The incidence of disability was determined using municipal data on eligibility for long-term care insurance benefits. There were 7643 (24.4%) community-dwelling participants with low subjective food store availability and 5673 (18.1%) with low objective food store availability. During the follow-up period of 6 years, the cumulative incidence of disability was 20.9%, with a significant association between low subjective food store availability and increased disability. Participants who reported low subjective food store availability had a significantly higher likelihood of developing disability (hazard ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval: 1.11–1.25) than those who reported high subjective food store availability after adjusting for age, sex, sociodemographic status, environmental status, walking and going out, dietary food intake, body mass index, and comorbidities. Low subjective food store availability was associated with early onset of disability. Accessibility of food stores might contribute to maintaining a disability-free life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Lifestyle and Healthy Ageing)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Nutrition and Muscle Strength, As the Key Component of Sarcopenia: An Overview of Current Evidence
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2942; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122942 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
Much has been achieved by recent research to increase understanding of the links between nutrition and muscle health. Focusing on muscle strength as the key component of sarcopenia, the aim of this overview was to evaluate its links to nutrition, both to variation [...] Read more.
Much has been achieved by recent research to increase understanding of the links between nutrition and muscle health. Focusing on muscle strength as the key component of sarcopenia, the aim of this overview was to evaluate its links to nutrition, both to variation in habitual diets in older populations, as well as considering supplementation effects in trials. A main message from the reviewed studies is that while many provide suggestive evidence of benefits of higher nutrient intakes and diets of higher quality, findings are inconsistent, and data on muscle strength are often lacking. To assess the potential of optimising diets as a strategy to promote and maintain muscle strength, gaps in current evidence need to be addressed. These include the need for (i) better understanding of individual differences in responsiveness to dietary change, and the need for targeted nutritional support; (ii) clearer distinction between protective and therapeutic actions of diet; and (iii) definition of the role of dietary patterns and their influence on muscle strength, to allow effects of changes in food consumption to be evaluated—particularly when combined with physical activity. Development of this evidence is needed to enable translation into appropriate dietary recommendations for older populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Lifestyle and Healthy Ageing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop