Special Issue "Impact of Malnutrition upon Healthcare and Clinical Outcomes"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (26 February 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Keisuke Maeda
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geriatric Medicine, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
Interests: geriatric nutrition; sarcopenia; frailty; dysphagia; aspiration pneumonia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There has been growing interest in malnutrition, including undernutrition and obesity, as a potential target for disease treatment and prevention. Numerous studies have shown associations between malnutrition and health outcomes. Malnutrition is caused by various factors such as loss of appetite and nutritional intake, swallowing difficulties, aging, inactivity, acute inflammatory diseases, chronic inflammatory diseases, endocrine diseases, and even hospitalization. Given that global criteria to diagnose malnutrition and malnutrition-related conditions such as frailty, sarcopenia, and cachexia have been proposed lately, research on malnutrition in every setting would be accelerated.

The aim of this Special Issue is to update knowledge on malnutrition related to healthcare and clinical outcomes. Original research conducted in communities, care facilities, clinics, and hospitals and systematic/narrative review articles are invited. The Special Issue will focus on adult and geriatric nutrition. Investigations on the importance of nutrition support teams, nutritional screening/assessment, food fortification, artificial nutrition, hand feeding, and texture-modified diets are welcome.

Dr. Keisuke Maeda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Undernutrition
  • Obesity
  • Sarcopenia
  • Frailty
  • Cachexia
  • Dysphagia
  • Artificial nutrition

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Nutritional Management Enhances the Recovery of Swallowing Ability in Older Patients with Sarcopenic Dysphagia
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 596; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020596 - 11 Feb 2021
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Abstract
This study assessed whether a high provided energy of ≥30 kcal/ideal body weight (IBW)/day (kg) for patients with sarcopenic dysphagia effectively improved swallowing ability and the activities of daily living (ADLs). Among 110 patients with sarcopenic dysphagia (mean age, 84.9 ± 7.4 years) [...] Read more.
This study assessed whether a high provided energy of ≥30 kcal/ideal body weight (IBW)/day (kg) for patients with sarcopenic dysphagia effectively improved swallowing ability and the activities of daily living (ADLs). Among 110 patients with sarcopenic dysphagia (mean age, 84.9 ± 7.4 years) who were admitted to a post-acute hospital, swallowing ability and the ADLs were assessed using the Food Intake LEVEL Scale (FILS) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), respectively. The primary outcome was the FILS at discharge, while the secondary outcome was the achievement of the FIM with a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) at discharge. We created a homogeneous probability model without statistically significant differences using the inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) method with and without a mean provided energy of ≥30 kcal/IBW/day (kg) for a period of 1 week of hospitalization and compared the outcomes between groups. A mean provided energy of ≥30 kcal/IBW/day (kg) was achieved in 62.7% of patients. In the IPTW model, the FILS and the rates of achieved MCID of the FIM at discharge were significantly higher in the mean provided energy of ≥30 kcal/IBW/day (kg) group (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001, respectively). A high provided energy for patients with sarcopenic dysphagia may improve swallowing ability and produce clinically meaningful functional outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Malnutrition upon Healthcare and Clinical Outcomes)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Related Factors and Clinical Outcomes of Osteosarcopenia: A Narrative Review
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020291 - 20 Jan 2021
Viewed by 947
Abstract
Osteopenia/osteoporosis and sarcopenia are common geriatric diseases among older adults and harm activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QOL). Osteosarcopenia is a unique syndrome that is a concomitant of both osteopenia/osteoporosis and sarcopenia. This review aimed to summarize the related [...] Read more.
Osteopenia/osteoporosis and sarcopenia are common geriatric diseases among older adults and harm activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QOL). Osteosarcopenia is a unique syndrome that is a concomitant of both osteopenia/osteoporosis and sarcopenia. This review aimed to summarize the related factors and clinical outcomes of osteosarcopenia to facilitate understanding, evaluation, prevention, treatment, and further research on osteosarcopenia. We searched the literature to include meta-analyses, reviews, and clinical trials. The prevalence of osteosarcopenia among community-dwelling older adults is significantly higher in female (up to 64.3%) compared to male (8–11%). Osteosarcopenia is a risk factor for death, fractures, and falls based on longitudinal studies. However, the associations between osteosarcopenia and many other factors have been derived based on cross-sectional studies, so the causal relationship is not clear. Few studies of osteosarcopenia in hospitals have been conducted. Osteosarcopenia is a new concept and has not yet been fully researched its relationship to clinical outcomes. Longitudinal studies and high-quality interventional studies are warranted in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Malnutrition upon Healthcare and Clinical Outcomes)
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Open AccessReview
Undernutrition, Sarcopenia, and Frailty in Fragility Hip Fracture: Advanced Strategies for Improving Clinical Outcomes
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3743; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123743 - 04 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1423
Abstract
Geriatric patients with hip fractures often experience overlap in problems related to nutrition, including undernutrition, sarcopenia, and frailty. Such problems are powerful predictors of adverse responses, although few healthcare professionals are aware of them and therefore do not implement effective interventions. This review [...] Read more.
Geriatric patients with hip fractures often experience overlap in problems related to nutrition, including undernutrition, sarcopenia, and frailty. Such problems are powerful predictors of adverse responses, although few healthcare professionals are aware of them and therefore do not implement effective interventions. This review aimed to summarize the impact of undernutrition, sarcopenia, and frailty on clinical outcomes in elderly individuals with hip fractures and identify successful strategies that integrate nutrition and rehabilitation. We searched PubMed (MEDLINE) and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for relevant literature published over the last 10 years and found that advanced interventions targeting the aforementioned conditions helped to significantly improve postoperative outcomes among these patients. Going forward, protocols from advanced interventions for detecting, diagnosing, and treating nutrition problems in geriatric patients with hip fractures should become standard practice in healthcare settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Malnutrition upon Healthcare and Clinical Outcomes)
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