Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 2nd International Electronic Conference on Nutrients - Nutrition Support for Immunity and Countermeasure Effects on Infection, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 1397

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. David C. Nieman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Biology, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608, USA
2. Director of the Human Performance Laboratory,North Carolina Research Campus, Kannapolis, NC 28081, USA
Interests: sports nutrition; exercise; immunology; inflammation; obesity; metabolomics; proteomics; lipid mediators
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Leanne M. Redman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, 6400 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
Interests: obesity; calorie restriction; dietary interventions; overfeeding; pregnancy; gestational diabetes; breast feeding; infant formula
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

This Special Issue comprises selected papers from the Proceedings of the Second International Electronic Conference—Nutrition Support for Immunity and Countermeasure Effects on Infection, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress. The conference will be held from 15 to 31 March 2022 on sciforum.net, an online platform for hosting scholarly e-conferences and discussion groups. Selected extended papers from this e-conference can be submitted to the conference Special Issue with a 20% discount on the article processing charge.

The immune system is complex, distributed throughout the body, and highly active. Appropriate nutrients are necessary for the varied cells of the immune system to function optimally and respond to injury, inflammation, oxidative stress, and invading viruses and bacteria. This Special Issue will provide information on current trends and insights into nutritional immunology and immunonutrition strategies to counter infection, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

Prof. Dr. David C. Nieman
Dr. Leanne M. Redman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • immune function
  • nutrition
  • infection
  • inflammation
  • oxidative stress
  • COVID-19

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Antioxidant Supplementation Hinders the Role of Exercise Training as a Natural Activator of SIRT1
Nutrients 2022, 14(10), 2092; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14102092 - 17 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 705
Abstract
Exercise training (ET) is a natural activator of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), a stress-sensor able to increase the endogenous antioxidant system. SIRT1 activators include polyphenols and vitamins, the antioxidant properties of which are well-known. Antioxidant supplements are used [...] Read more.
Exercise training (ET) is a natural activator of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), a stress-sensor able to increase the endogenous antioxidant system. SIRT1 activators include polyphenols and vitamins, the antioxidant properties of which are well-known. Antioxidant supplements are used to improve athletic performance. However, they might blunt ET-related benefits. Middle-distance runners (MDR) taking (MDR-S) or not taking antioxidant supplements (MDR-NoS) were compared with each other and with sedentary subjects (CTR) to evaluate the ET effects on SIRT1 levels and oxidative stress, and to investigate whether an exogenous source of antioxidants could interfere with such effects. Thirty-two MDR and 14 CTR were enrolled. MDR-S took 240 mg vitamin C and 15 mg vitamin E together with mineral salts. SIRT1 mRNA and activity were measured in PBMCs. Total oxidative status (TOS) and total antioxidant capacity (TEAC) were determined in plasma. MDR showed higher levels of SIRT1 mRNA (p = 0.0387) and activity (p = 0.0055) than did CTR. MDR-NoS also showed higher levels than did MDR-S without reaching statistical significance. SIRT1 activity was higher (p = 0.0012) in MDR-NoS (1909 ± 626) than in MDR-S (1276 ± 474). TOS did not differ among the groups, while MDR showed higher TEAC levels than did CTR (2866 ± 581 vs. 2082 ± 560, p = 0.0001) as did MDR-S (2784 ± 643) and MDR-NoS (2919 ± 551) (MDR-S vs. CTR, p = 0.0007 and MDR-NoS vs. CTR, p = 0.003). TEAC (β = 0.4488356, 95% CI 0.2074645 0.6902067; p < 0.0001) and the MDR-NoS group (β = 744.6433, 95% CI 169.9954 1319.291; p= 0.012) predicted SIRT1 activity levels. Antioxidant supplementation seems to hinder the role of ET as a natural activator of SIRT1. Full article
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