Optimizing Nutrition for Sports and Metabolic Chronic Disease

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 1165

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Sport Medicine Center, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, 50121 Florence, Italy
Interests: physical exercise; training; non-communicable chronic diseases; sedentary time; cardio-metabolic and inflammatory risk biomarkers; nutritional integration; functional evaluation; long-term efficacy of physical exercise; exercise prescription in non-communicable chronic disease and in solid organ transplantations; cardiotoxicity; echocardiographic deformation parameters
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition and body composition represent the principal aspects of sports performance for extreme and high-intensity sports and for social sports. A correct lifestyle includes indications for food intake to reduce the possibility of accumulation of cardiovascular risks such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity and to improve life expectancy. Sports medicine is largely involved in exercise prescription programs, and nutritional investigation contributes to tailoring these exercise programs. In fact, few data are available, especially in cases of extreme ambient conditions, as is usual for “tactical athletes” working in high-impact sports. This Special Issue will focus on the factors related to lifestyle, dietary approaches, food intake and composition that influence sports activity and lifestyle reconditioning. Authors are also encouraged to submit research and reviews with emphasis on prevention and treatment strategies.

Dr. Laura Stefani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • sports nutrition
  • developmental origin of health and disease
  • obesity
  • metabolic disorders
  • lifestyle and nutrition in extreme sports
  • lifestyle reconditioning

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 591 KiB  
Article
Unsupervised Exercise Intervention vs. Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet Alone: The Role of Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis and Cardiovascular Performance in Liver-Transplanted Recipients
by Gabriele Mascherini, Marco Corsi, Edoardo Falconi, Álex Cebrián-Ponce, Pietro Checcucci, Antonio Pinazzi, Domenico Russo, Stefano Gitto, Francesco Sofi and Laura Stefani
Nutrients 2024, 16(2), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16020190 - 5 Jan 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of mortality after liver transplantation. Body composition and cardiovascular performance assessment represent a potential approach for modulating lifestyle correction and proper follow-up in chronic disease patients. This study aimed to verify the additional [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of mortality after liver transplantation. Body composition and cardiovascular performance assessment represent a potential approach for modulating lifestyle correction and proper follow-up in chronic disease patients. This study aimed to verify the additional role of an unsupervised physical activity program in a sample of male liver transplant recipients who follow the Mediterranean diet. (2) Methods: Thirty-three male liver transplant recipients were enrolled. Sixteen subjects followed a moderate-intensity home exercise program in addition to nutritional support, and seventeen received advice on the Mediterranean diet. After six months, bioelectrical vector impedance analysis (BIVA) and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) were performed. (3) Results: No differences in CPET (VO2 peak: exercise 21.4 ± 4.1 vs. diet 23.5 ± 6.5 mL/kg/min; p = 0.283) and BIVA (Z/H: exercise 288.3 ± 33.9 vs. diet 310.5 ± 34.2 Ω/m; p = 0.071) were found. Furthermore, the BIVA values of resistance correlate with the submaximal performance of the Ve/VCO2 slope (R = 0.509; p < 0.05) and phase angle with the maximal effort of the VO2 peak (R = 0.557; p < 0.05). (4) Conclusions: Unsupervised physical exercise alone for six months does not substantially modify liver transplant recipients’ cardiovascular performance and hydration status, despite their adherence to a Mediterranean diet. The body composition analysis is useful to stratify the risk profile, and it is potentially associated with better outcomes in transplanted subjects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimizing Nutrition for Sports and Metabolic Chronic Disease)
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