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Effects of Home-Based Exercise Rehabilitation Program

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Health, Well-Being and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021) | Viewed by 20024

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Sport Medicine Center, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, 50121 Florence, Italy
Interests: physical exercise; training; non-communicable chronic diseases; sedentary time; cardio-metabolic and inflammatory risk biomarkers; nutritional integration; functional evaluation; long-term efficacy of physical exercise; exercise prescription in non-communicable chronic disease and in solid organ transplantations; cardiotoxicity; echocardiographic deformation parameters
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The topic of this Special Issue is exercise prescription in chronic diseases—one of the most important fields of research interest in sports medicine. Particularly, the “home-based programs” are addressed to restore a correct lifestyle in order to reduce the negative impact of the cardiovascular risk factors, particularly in non-communicable chronic disease. This is possible in an unsupervised form by planning and allowing exercise programs, with the exclusion of constant exercise supervision, avoiding an excessive medicalization. Many strategies can be advised for appropriate and specific training in all individuals. Authors are invited to submit papers about exercise evaluation and prescription in patients, healthy subjects, and athletes submitted to exercise prescription therapy.

Dr. Laura Stefani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • physical exercise
  • movement sciences
  • sports medicine
  • physical activity
  • physical inactivity
  • non-communicable chronic disease
  • exercise prescription therapy
  • home-based exercises
  • adapted physical activity
  • tailor-made exercise

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 490 KiB  
Article
A Simple Home-Based Lifestyle Intervention Program to Improve Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Patients with Increased Cardiometabolic Risk
by Daniela Lucini, Mara Malacarne, Wolfgang Gatzemeier and Massimo Pagani
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7671; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187671 - 17 Sep 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1949
Abstract
Lifestyle modification programs (LMP) represent a new approach to cardiometabolic/oncologic risk reduction. Successful LMP in clinical practice must be feasible, cost effective, efficacious and consider home-based exercise. Likewise, multiple mechanisms implied in cardiometabolic risk reduction such as cardiac autonomic regulation (CAR) should be [...] Read more.
Lifestyle modification programs (LMP) represent a new approach to cardiometabolic/oncologic risk reduction. Successful LMP in clinical practice must be feasible, cost effective, efficacious and consider home-based exercise. Likewise, multiple mechanisms implied in cardiometabolic risk reduction such as cardiac autonomic regulation (CAR) should be easily evidenced, in spite of the computational complexity involved. This goal could be facilitated by employing novel, friendlier, simpler techniques, such as the Autonomic Nervous System Index (ANSI), which can be treated as a proxy of CAR. In this observational study, we introduce a simple LMP (based on cognitive behavioral strategies and patient-tailored prescription of nutrition and home-based exercise, managed by a single physician) into the currently existing clinical practice of secondary cardiometabolic prevention. In 26 subjects, we assessed CAR (autoregressive spectral analysis of cardiovascular variabilities), body mass composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis) and stress perception (questionnaires). After LMP, ANSI and lipid profile were improved; % of fat mass, waist circumference and stress perception were reduced. We conclude that this preliminary, proof of concept study provides significant evidence in favor of the hypothesis that it is possible to introduce a convenient, cost effective LMP into the currently existing clinical practice of secondary cardiometabolic prevention. Findings suggest a successful comprehensive behavioral change, possibly facilitated by the simplified approach employed in this study, capable of improving cardiac autonomic regulation in addition to body mass composition and stress perception. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Home-Based Exercise Rehabilitation Program)
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10 pages, 1380 KiB  
Article
Effects of Yoga Practice on Personality, Body Image and Lactate. Pilot Study on a Group of Women from 40 Years
by Marinella Coco, Andrea Buscemi, Elisabetta Sagone, Monica Pellerone, Tiziana Ramaci, Martina Marchese, Vincenzo Perciavalle, Valentina Perciavalle and Giuseppe Musumeci
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6719; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176719 - 19 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2882
Abstract
Yoga techniques are increasingly popular all over the world. This discipline provides benefits both in relation to particular psychological disorders, such as anxiety disorders or those related to stress, but also in relation to certain clinical frameworks that involve significant life changes of [...] Read more.
Yoga techniques are increasingly popular all over the world. This discipline provides benefits both in relation to particular psychological disorders, such as anxiety disorders or those related to stress, but also in relation to certain clinical frameworks that involve significant life changes of people. Some studies have shown that this practice brings relevant benefits regarding cognitive functions such as memory and attention. The aim of this study was to verify, in women over 40 years of age, whether the practice of yoga can positively affect self-esteem, anxiety control, and body image. It was also intended to verify whether the potential beneficial effects of yoga are influenced by the personality’s profile of the individual who practices it. Results demonstrated comparable data on a high level of well-being and psychophysical balance for all samples involved. These results, therefore, confirm that the constantly practiced yogic technique affects the lifestyle of the subject by promoting the learning of effective methods for physical health and well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Home-Based Exercise Rehabilitation Program)
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Review

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12 pages, 1516 KiB  
Review
Physical Activity, Exercise Prescription for Health and Home-Based Rehabilitation
by Herbert Loellgen, Petra Zupet, Norbert Bachl and Andre Debruyne
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10230; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410230 - 8 Dec 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 6441
Abstract
The aim of this overview was to recommend individual training plans using exercise prescriptions for adults and older adults during home-based rehabilitation. Over the last decade, many regular physical activity studies with large prospective cohorts have been conducted. Taken together, more than a [...] Read more.
The aim of this overview was to recommend individual training plans using exercise prescriptions for adults and older adults during home-based rehabilitation. Over the last decade, many regular physical activity studies with large prospective cohorts have been conducted. Taken together, more than a million subjects have been included in these exercise studies. The risk of morbidity and mortality has been reduced by 30% to 40% as a result of exercise. These risk reductions hold true for many diseases, as well as for prevention and rehabilitation. Physical activity has also been in the treatment of many diseases, such as cardiopulmonary, metabolic or neurologic/psychiatric diseases, all with positive results. Based on these results, the prescription of exercise was developed and is now known as the exercise prescription for health in many European countries. Details have been published by the European Federation of Sports Medicine Associations (EFSMA). The exercise prescription is strongly recommended for inpatients, discharged patients and outpatients who have recovered from severe diseases. Rehabilitation improves general health, physical fitness, quality of life and may increase longevity of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Home-Based Exercise Rehabilitation Program)
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Other

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12 pages, 294 KiB  
Perspective
Healthy Teleworking: Towards Personalized Exercise Recommendations
by Maricarmen Almarcha, Natàlia Balagué and Carlota Torrents
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3192; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063192 - 15 Mar 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3917
Abstract
Home-based teleworking, associated with sedentary behavior, may impair self-reported adult health status. Current exercise recommendations, based on universal recipes, may be insufficient or even misleading to promote healthy teleworking. From the Network Physiology of Exercise perspective, health is redefined as an adaptive emergent [...] Read more.
Home-based teleworking, associated with sedentary behavior, may impair self-reported adult health status. Current exercise recommendations, based on universal recipes, may be insufficient or even misleading to promote healthy teleworking. From the Network Physiology of Exercise perspective, health is redefined as an adaptive emergent state, product of dynamic interactions among multiple levels (from genetic to social) that cannot be reduced to a few dimensions. Under such a perspective, fitness development is focused on enhancing the individual functional diversity potential, which is better achieved through varied and personalized exercise proposals. This paper discusses some myths related to ideal or unique recommendations, like the ideal exercise or posture, and the contribution of recent computer technologies and applications for prescribing exercise and assessing fitness. Highlighting the need for creating personalized working environments and strengthening the active contribution of users in the process, new recommendations related to teleworking posture, home exercise counselling, exercise monitoring and to the roles of healthcare and exercise professionals are proposed. Instead of exercise prescribers, professionals act as co-designers that help users to learn, co-adapt and adequately contextualize exercise in order to promote their somatic awareness, job satisfaction, productivity, work–life balance, wellbeing and health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Home-Based Exercise Rehabilitation Program)
9 pages, 216 KiB  
Case Report
New Strategy of Home-Based Exercise during Pandemic COVID-19 in Breast Cancer Patients: A Case Study
by Elisa Grazioli, Claudia Cerulli, Ivan Dimauro, Elisa Moretti, Arianna Murri and Attilio Parisi
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6940; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176940 - 26 Aug 2020
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 3981
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has posed several challenges for the oncology health care system. The need to improve patients’ Quality of Life (QoL) through exercise, which is related to survival and healing, has increased, especially during lockdowns. Technologies are often used to help with [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has posed several challenges for the oncology health care system. The need to improve patients’ Quality of Life (QoL) through exercise, which is related to survival and healing, has increased, especially during lockdowns. Technologies are often used to help with patient care as well as to monitor exercise training. This case study, developed during the pandemic period, aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a proposed home-based combined training (CT) regimen, supervised through online lessons, in increasing QoL and fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy. Additionally, we evaluated the effect of exercise on psychological and functional parameters. Methods: Two breast cancer (BC) survivors were required to participate in 2 h/week of supervised and home-based CT for 16 weeks. Results: Improvements were found in the emotional function of QoL (10% in patient A; 70% in patient B) and in all variables of fatigue (physical fatigue 66% in patient A; 33% in patient B). Conclusion: The findings from this study revealed positive effects of CT on QoL and fatigue perception in BC women undergoing therapy. Both patients attended all training sessions with no adverse events, showing the sustainability of this training as an alternative and affordable method that is capable of improving patients’ wellbeing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Home-Based Exercise Rehabilitation Program)
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