Special Issue "Current State of the Art—Nutraceutical Components of Foods"

A special issue of Nutraceuticals (ISSN 1661-3821).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 5791

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Anna Iwaniak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Pl. Cieszyński 1, 10-719 Olsztyn-Kortowo, Poland
Interests: food proteins; bioinformatic analysis; bioactive and functional peptides; bioactive peptide sequences; cheminformatic approach
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are all familiar with the popular slogan, “you are what you eat”, and today, everyone is becoming more aware of the impact of diet on our health. Moreover, the media promote much information on so-called healthy eating, diets, and lifestyle fashions. Distinguishing what is reliable or not is often difficult for the consumer. Additionally, the contemporary world is struggling with the aging of the population, which necessitates the design of a diet for “healthy aging”. In this context, nutraceuticals, health-supportive substances, are still significant, remaining in the focus of scientific interests and being continuously developed worldwide.

I am honored to announce this Special Issue titled “Current State of the Art—Nutraceutical Components of Foods”. This issue is jointed with another similar Special Issue in Applied Sciences (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci/special_issues/Nutraceutical_Components). Our Special Issue is addressed to all scientists who study, inter alia, i) the therapeutic potential of food-derived compounds; ii) analyzing them using in vitro, in vivo, and in silico methodologies; iii) the impact of dietary patterns on the risks of diet-related diseases; iv) the interactions between nutraceutical foods and other food components in the context of human health; v) novel technologies aiming to provide nutraceuticals to the organism in an active form; and vi) the pros and cons of nutraceutical foods. All types of articles, i.e., reviews, original papers, and short communications, are kindly welcome.

The deadlines for manuscript submission are 30 June 2021 (Nutraceuticals) and 15 September 2021 (Applied Sciences). We also encourage authors to submit, in advance, short abstracts or tentative titles to the Editor (Melon Zhang; e-mail: [email protected]). The submitted papers should not be considered for publication elsewhere.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,
Prof. Dr. Anna Iwaniak
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutraceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Anti-Inflammatory and Neuroprotective Effect of the Anti-Obesity Dietary Supplement Dekosilhue® in an In Vitro Model of Neuroinflammation
Nutraceuticals 2022, 2(1), 22-31; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals2010002 - 08 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Obesity is now recognized as a global health problem and has reached epidemic proportions, affecting both developed and developing countries. This condition is associated with an increased incidence in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. The intake of foods or supplements with anti-inflammatory activity [...] Read more.
Obesity is now recognized as a global health problem and has reached epidemic proportions, affecting both developed and developing countries. This condition is associated with an increased incidence in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. The intake of foods or supplements with anti-inflammatory activity could potentially lead to a lower impact of obesity on the functionality of CNS. Therefore, in this work we tested the effect of a dietary supplement, DEKOSILHUE® (DSK), containing polyphenols enriched herbal extracts and successfully used for improving the control of body weight, in an in vitro inflammatory model. LPS-stimulated immortalized microglia BV2 cells have been used as a model of neuroinflammation. The stimulation with LPS increased the release and activation of several neuroinflammatory mediators, such as IKB⍺, HDAC-1, and IL-1ß. DSK reduced the levels and the activation of all these pro-inflammatory markers. In addition, DSK increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, promoting an anti-inflammatory response. Finally, we showed that the anti-inflammatory effect of DSK can prevent the neurotoxicity related to microglia hyperactivation. In conclusion, DSK could potentially help in controlling neuroinflammation CNS, reducing microglia pro-inflammatory activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current State of the Art—Nutraceutical Components of Foods)
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Article
Formulation of Rosemary Extracts through Spray-Drying Encapsulation or Emulsification
Nutraceuticals 2022, 2(1), 1-21; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals2010001 - 20 Jan 2022
Viewed by 805
Abstract
Natural, plant-derived antioxidants can be used to prolong the shelf life of food or cosmetics, or as health-promoting additives. Although their extraction from plants has been extensively studied, purification and formulation processes need further research to allow their exploitation. In the present work, [...] Read more.
Natural, plant-derived antioxidants can be used to prolong the shelf life of food or cosmetics, or as health-promoting additives. Although their extraction from plants has been extensively studied, purification and formulation processes need further research to allow their exploitation. In the present work, rosemary extracts were obtained by successive extractions with acetone and water or single extraction by either an acetone:water or ethanol:water mixture. The extracts were analyzed by HPLC-DAD, and rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, carnosol, and several flavonoids were identified and quantified. The extracts obtained by water or aqueous mixtures of organic solvents were encapsulated in maltodextrin combined with gum arabic with a high encapsulation yield (90–100%) and efficiency (97%) for rosmarinic acid and flavonoids. The acetone extract, rich in carnosic acid, was transformed to oil solution and either encapsulated or formulated in emulsion. The shelf life of encapsulated products was tested over a period of six months, and the results showed high retention of rosmarinic acid (88%) and lower of flavonoids (54–80%). Carnosic acid presented lower retention either encapsulated in solid powder (65–70% after one month at ambient temperature) or in emulsion (48% after 20 days of storage at 15 °C), while it was partially transformed to carnosol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current State of the Art—Nutraceutical Components of Foods)
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Article
Azelaic Acid Esters as Pluripotent Immunomodulatory Molecules: Nutritional Supplements or Drugs
Nutraceuticals 2021, 1(1), 42-53; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals1010006 - 17 Dec 2021
Viewed by 689
Abstract
Azelaic acid and its esters, the azelates, occur naturally in organisms ranging from plants to humans. We have shown that diethyl azelate (DEA) exhibits a broad range of immunomodulatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and mitigates insulin resistance. To further investigate the [...] Read more.
Azelaic acid and its esters, the azelates, occur naturally in organisms ranging from plants to humans. We have shown that diethyl azelate (DEA) exhibits a broad range of immunomodulatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and mitigates insulin resistance. To further investigate the therapeutic utility of DEA, we evaluated its mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains, examined metabolism of DEA in rat, dog, monkey and human primary hepatocytes and in human saliva, determined pharmacokinetics of DEA after an oral dose in rats, and queried its physicochemical properties for drug-like characteristics. DEA was not mutagenic in bacterial strains ± rat liver metabolic activation system S-9. It was chemically unstable in hepatocyte culture medium with a half-life of <1 h and was depleted by the hepatocytes in <5 min, suggesting rapid hepatic metabolism. DEA was also quickly degraded by human saliva in vitro. After an oral administration of DEA to rats, the di- and monoester were undetectable in plasma while the levels of azelaic acid increased over time, reached maximum at <2 h, and declined rapidly thereafter. The observed pharmacological properties of DEA suggest that it has value both as a drug or a nutritional supplement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current State of the Art—Nutraceutical Components of Foods)
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Article
Friends or Foes? Cytotoxicity, HPTLC and NMR Analyses of Some Important Naturally Occurring Hydroxyanthraquinones
Nutraceuticals 2021, 1(1), 13-30; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals1010004 - 18 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Hydroxyanthraquinones from plants have been used as both medicinal active ingredients and adulterants in slimming food supplements. Although sensible doses of certain natural hydroxyanthraquinones for laxative effects are generally safe in the short term, chronic intake has been related to tumorigenic, carcinogenic, and [...] Read more.
Hydroxyanthraquinones from plants have been used as both medicinal active ingredients and adulterants in slimming food supplements. Although sensible doses of certain natural hydroxyanthraquinones for laxative effects are generally safe in the short term, chronic intake has been related to tumorigenic, carcinogenic, and genotoxic effects. However, an increasing number of researchers are reporting the antiproliferative properties of the same ingredients in cancer cells, pointing towards a potential nutraceutical value for cancer prevention. Previous studies have evaluated anthraquinones’ anti-proliferative activity against various tumour cell lines and bioavailability in Caco-2 cells. However, there are scarce data about both their cytotoxicity in the later cell line and long-term stability. Therefore, this study will check the purity of several ‘aged’ samples using mutually complementary analytical techniques such as HPTLC and NMR assays as well as evaluate the anti-proliferative activity of the purest of these samples using the Caco-2 cell line. The chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses confirmed the long-term stability of those compounds, and their cytotoxic activity resulted in chrysazin (15 µg/mL) > catenarin (27.29 µg/mL) > rhein (49.55 µg/mL) > helminthosporin (52.91 µg/mL) > aloe-emodin (55.34 µg/mL). Our succinct review of the cytotoxicity of these compounds afforded two results: that this is the first clear report for catenarin being active in colon cancer cells and that this class of compounds needs to be better studied to clearly evaluate their benefit/risk profile in regard to both new chemo preventative nutraceuticals and anticancer therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current State of the Art—Nutraceutical Components of Foods)
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Article
Effects of Zembrin® (Sceletium tortuosum) Supplementation on Mood, Soreness, and Performance Following Unaccustomed Resistance Exercise: A Pilot Study
Nutraceuticals 2021, 1(1), 2-11; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals1010002 - 16 Sep 2021
Viewed by 1398
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate acute Zembrin® (Sceletium tortuosum) supplementation on muscle soreness, markers of muscle damage, mood, and exercise performance following unaccustomed resistance exercise. Untrained females (n = 16) were divided into two groups with [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate acute Zembrin® (Sceletium tortuosum) supplementation on muscle soreness, markers of muscle damage, mood, and exercise performance following unaccustomed resistance exercise. Untrained females (n = 16) were divided into two groups with a different three-day treatment regimen: (1) placebo (PL) and (2) Zembrin® (ZEM). During the initial visit, baseline perceived soreness, range of motion (ROM), mood state (profile of mood states (POMS) questionnaire), and plasma lactate dehydrogenase concentrations (LDH) were measured followed by the performance of an eccentric bicep curl protocol with their non-dominant arm. The total repetitions and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded throughout the exercise. The participants then supplemented with the corresponding treatment immediately following, the subsequent day, and 30 min prior to completing a 48 h follow-up visit. For the 48 h visit, all procedures were repeated and comparisons were drawn for perceived soreness, ROM, LDH, mood scores, total repetitions, and RPE. The findings indicate that short-term ZEM supplementation resulted in lower perceived soreness (p = 0.020) and a greater preservation of ROM (p = 0.028) at 48 h versus the PL group. Mood worsened from the baseline to 48 h regardless of the treatment (p = 0.043) but the decrements were exacerbated in the PL group compared with the ZEM group (p < 0.001). LDH levels (p = 0.019) and RPE (p = 0.008) were higher and total repetitions were lower (p < 0.001) at 48 h irrespective of the treatment. Although short-term dietary enrichment with ZEM did not alter the exercise performance or biomarkers of muscle damage, the current results suggest ZEM supplementation may be effective in reducing the markers of soreness and preserve mood following unaccustomed eccentric exercise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current State of the Art—Nutraceutical Components of Foods)
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Review

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Review
Recent Advances in the Extraction of Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd. Used in Traditional Aboriginal Medicine: A Mini Review
Nutraceuticals 2022, 2(2), 49-59; https://doi.org/10.3390/nutraceuticals2020004 - 01 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Numerous native Australian plants are widely used as traditional medicines by the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Among the native plants, Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd. (Gumby Gumby) is claimed to be a promising medicinal plant in the treatment of a wide range [...] Read more.
Numerous native Australian plants are widely used as traditional medicines by the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Among the native plants, Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd. (Gumby Gumby) is claimed to be a promising medicinal plant in the treatment of a wide range of diseases that includes viral symptoms (colds and coughs), eczema, cancer, muscle aches, varicose veins, and many more. Various extraction techniques are used to extract the bioactive compounds of P. angustifolium, which are formulated into nutraceuticals. The present paper will provide an overview of the recent development in the extraction of bioactive ingredients from P. angustifolium, as well as the findings on the phytochemicals and antimicrobial activity of P. angustifolium extracts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current State of the Art—Nutraceutical Components of Foods)
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