Special Issue "Feature Papers from Non-coding RNA Reviewers"

A special issue of Non-Coding RNA (ISSN 2311-553X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 4416

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue welcomes high-quality papers on non-coding RNA from journal reviewers.

Dr. Luca Falzone
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Non-Coding RNA is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Hsa-miR-183-5p Modulates Cell Adhesion by Repression of ITGB1 Expression in Prostate Cancer
Non-Coding RNA 2022, 8(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna8010011 - 18 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1122
Abstract
Prostate cancer is a major health problem worldwide. MiR-183 is an oncomiR and a candidate biomarker in prostate cancer, affecting various pathways responsible for disease initiation and progression. We sought to discover the most relevant processes controlled by miR-183 through an unbiased transcriptomic [...] Read more.
Prostate cancer is a major health problem worldwide. MiR-183 is an oncomiR and a candidate biomarker in prostate cancer, affecting various pathways responsible for disease initiation and progression. We sought to discover the most relevant processes controlled by miR-183 through an unbiased transcriptomic approach using prostate cell lines and patient tissues to identify miR-183 responsive genes and pathways. Gain of function experiments, reporter gene assays, and transcript and protein measurements were conducted to validate predicted functional effects and protein mediators. A total of 135 candidate miR-183 target genes overrepresenting cell adhesion terms were inferred from the integrated transcriptomic analysis. Cell attachment, spreading assays and focal adhesion quantification of miR-183-overexpressing cells confirmed the predicted reduction in cell adhesion. ITGB1 was validated as a major target of repression by miR-183 as well as a mediator of cell adhesion in response to miR-183. The reporter gene assay and PAR-CLIP read mapping suggest that ITGB1 may be a direct target of miR-183. The negative correlation between miR-183 and ITGB1 expression in prostate cancer cohorts supports their interaction in the clinical set. Overall, cell adhesion was uncovered as a major pathway controlled by miR-183 in prostate cancer, and ITGB1 was identified as a relevant mediator of this effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers from Non-coding RNA Reviewers)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
ABHD11-AS1: An Emerging Long Non-Coding RNA (lncRNA) with Clinical Significance in Human Malignancies
Non-Coding RNA 2022, 8(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna8020021 - 01 Mar 2022
Viewed by 1610
Abstract
The aberrant expression of lncRNAs has been linked to the development and progression of different cancers. One such lncRNA is ABHD11 antisense RNA 1 (ABHD11-AS1), which has recently gained attention for its significant role in human malignancies. ABHD11-AS1 is highly expressed in gastric, [...] Read more.
The aberrant expression of lncRNAs has been linked to the development and progression of different cancers. One such lncRNA is ABHD11 antisense RNA 1 (ABHD11-AS1), which has recently gained attention for its significant role in human malignancies. ABHD11-AS1 is highly expressed in gastric, lung, breast, colorectal, thyroid, pancreas, ovary, endometrium, cervix, and bladder cancers. Several reports highlighted the clinical significance of ABHD11-AS1 in prognosis, diagnosis, prediction of cancer progression stage, and treatment response. Significantly, the levels of ABHD11-AS1 in gastric juice had been exhibited as a clinical biomarker for the assessment of gastric cancer, while its serum levels have prognostic potential in thyroid cancers. The ABHD11-AS1 has been reported to exert oncogenic effects by sponging different microRNAs (miRNAs), altering signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt, epigenetic mechanisms, and N6-methyladenosine (m6A) RNA modification. In contrast, the mouse homolog of AHD11-AS1 (Abhd11os) overexpression had exhibited neuroprotective effects against mutant huntingtin-induced toxicity. Considering the emerging research reports, the authors attempted in this first review on ABHD11-AS1 to summarize and highlight its oncogenic potential and clinical significance in different human cancers. Lastly, we underlined the necessity for future mechanistic studies to unravel the role of ABHD11-AS1 in tumor development, prognosis, progression, and targeted therapeutic approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers from Non-coding RNA Reviewers)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review
Long Non-Coding RNAs as Emerging Regulators of Pathogen Response in Plants
Non-Coding RNA 2022, 8(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna8010004 - 11 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1348
Abstract
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding potential that contain more than 200 nucleotides that play important roles in plant survival in response to different stresses. They interact with molecules such as DNA, RNA, and protein, and play roles in the regulation [...] Read more.
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding potential that contain more than 200 nucleotides that play important roles in plant survival in response to different stresses. They interact with molecules such as DNA, RNA, and protein, and play roles in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, RNA metabolism, and protein modification activities. These lncRNAs regulate the expression of their downstream targets through epigenetic changes, at the level of transcription and post-transcription. Emerging information from computational biology and functional characterization of some of them has revealed their diverse mechanisms of action and possible roles in biological processes such as flowering time, reproductive organ development, as well as biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this review, we have mainly focused on the role of lncRNAs in biotic stress response due to the limited availability of knowledge in this domain. We have discussed the available molecular mechanisms of certain known lncRNAs against specific pathogens. Further, considering that fungal, viral, and bacterial diseases are major factors in the global food crisis, we have highlighted the importance of lncRNAs against pathogen responses and the progress in plant research to develop a better understanding of their functions and molecular mechanisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers from Non-coding RNA Reviewers)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Small nucleolar RNAs (SnoRNAs): Emerging Roles in Cancer Progression, Metastasis, and Immune Response
Authors: Vivek K. Kashyap,1,2,* Godwin P. Darkwah1, Deepak Parashar3, Saurabh Gupta4, Sanjay Kumar5, Bhupendra B. Srivastava6, Murali M. Yallapu,1,2 Meena Jaggi,1,2 and Subhash C. Chauhan1,2
Affiliation: 1 Department of Immunology and Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, McAllen, Texas, 78504, USA 2 South Texas Center of Excellence in Cancer Research, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, McAllen, TX 78504, USA 3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA 4 Department of Biotechnology, GLA University, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh, India 5 Sharda University, Greater Noida 201310, India 6 Department of Chemistry, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX, 78539, USA
Abstract: SnoRNAs (small nucleolar RNAs) are non-coding RNAs that are classified into two types: C/D box snoRNAs and H/ACA box snoRNAs. The canonical roles of snoRNAs, which include ribosome biogenesis and RNA modification, are well-known. SnoRNAs regulate miRNA expression by acting as endogenous sponges. Previously, snoRNAs were thought to be housekeeping molecules that helped ribosomes arrange their functions. Mutations and aberrant expression of snoRNAs have recently been discovered in cell transformation, carcinogenesis (different stages), and metastasis, suggesting that snoRNAs could be utilized as cancer biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets. As a result, greater investigation into the functions and processes of snoRNAs is required. Here we summarized the biogenesis, biological function, signaling pathways, and clinical utility of snoRNAs, as well as their relationship with various types of cancers and prospective involvement in cancer diagnostics and therapy.

Back to TopTop