ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Current Health Issues in Occupational Toxicology

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 10043

Special Issue Editors

Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, Occupational Medicine Section, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: occupational medicine; toxicology; biomarkers; oxidative stress; work-related stress
Dr. Giusi Briguglio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, Occupational Medicine Section, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: occupational medicine; toxicology; biomarkers; oxidative stress; work related stress
Clinical and Experimental Medicine Department, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: occupational medicine; toxicology; biomarkers; oxidative stress; work-related stress
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, Occupational Medicine Section, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: cancer; epigenetics; biomarkers; microRNAs; DNA methylation; occupational carcinogens
Dr. Marina Goumenou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences, University of Crete, 70013 Iraklio, Greece
Interests: environmental toxicology; risk assessment; genotoxicity; environmental pollution; exposure assessment; environmental analysis; biostatistics; toxicology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Occupational exposure to toxic pollutants has been associated with negative health impacts, such as increased morbidity and mortality. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown that these effects may depend on multiple issues: non-modifiable factors including age, gender and individual susceptibility, as well as modifiable factors such as smoking, alcohol, nutrition, lifestyle and occupational exposure.

A key challenge in occupational toxicology is to address the adverse effects from long-term exposure to low doses of compounds, close to health-based guidance values, often in complex mixtures. 

On this basis, a huge body of evidence suggests the importance of the early detection of occupational health damage and of the implementation of effective strategies to reduce exposure to xenobiotics in the workplace. 

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current state of knowledge regarding the links between exposure to occupational pollutants and human health. Original papers, short communications and reviews are welcome for this issue.

Papers dealing with new toxicological approaches to identifying early effects and individual susceptibility through “omics”, including epigenetics, and to measuring and characterizing biological effects from gene–environment interactions will be particularly appreciated.

We will accept manuscripts from different disciplines including exposure-assessment science, epidemiology, intervention studies, and risk and health impact assessment.

Dr. Luca Falzone
Prof. Dr. Chiara Costa
Prof. Dr. Concettina Fenga
Dr. Marina Goumenou
Dr. Giusi Briguglio
Dr. Federica Giambò
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • occupational diseases
  • cancer
  • pollutants
  • biological monitoring
  • biomarkers
  • oxidative stress
  • molecular biology
  • epigenetics
  • bioinformatics

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

12 pages, 855 KiB  
Article
Children and Parents’ Awareness Regarding Potential Hazards Derived from the Use of Chemical Products in Greece
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(24), 12948; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182412948 - 08 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1741
Abstract
Over the last decades, human activities prompted the high production and widespread use of household chemical products, leading to daily exposure of humans to several chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency of chemicals’ use by children and parents [...] Read more.
Over the last decades, human activities prompted the high production and widespread use of household chemical products, leading to daily exposure of humans to several chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency of chemicals’ use by children and parents in Greece and estimate the level of risk awareness and understanding among them. A total of 575 parents and children were asked to answer an anonymous, closed-ended, validated, and self-administered questionnaire. One-third of the children and almost half of the parents participating in the study believed that commonly used chemical products do not pose any risk to human health or to the environment, despite the product labelling. The majority of both children (61.8%) and parents (70.6%) were informed about product safety via the product labelling. Around 20% in both groups could not differentiate between systemic toxicity and acute lethal effects depicted by pictograms on the label and milder hazards, such as skin irritation. Moreover, the information on hazard and precautionary statements appearing on the label was very poorly perceived. Therefore, as both children and parents seem not to clearly identify the hazards and risks arising from the use of everyday chemical products, targeted awareness policies should be implemented to support the safe use of household products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Health Issues in Occupational Toxicology)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 3765 KiB  
Article
The Study of Airborne Particulate Matter in Dalnegorsk Town
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9234; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179234 - 01 Sep 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1938
Abstract
Mines, quarries, dumps, and tailings are the sources of air pollution. In the Dalnegorsk District (Primorsky Krai, Russia), there are 20 polymetallic deposits. This study aimed to evaluate the particle size and material composition of ambient particulate matter (PM) in Dalnegorsk town and [...] Read more.
Mines, quarries, dumps, and tailings are the sources of air pollution. In the Dalnegorsk District (Primorsky Krai, Russia), there are 20 polymetallic deposits. This study aimed to evaluate the particle size and material composition of ambient particulate matter (PM) in Dalnegorsk town and verify the influence of mining and chemical industry facilities on the composition of PM. Ambient particulates were analyzed in samples of snow cover and washout from vegetation (conifer tree needles). According to particle size distribution data, the relative content of particles with a diameter up to 10 microns (PM10) reaches 40% in three snow samples taken in the central part of the town. Among ore minerals, pyrite and arsenopyrite predominated in the samples. In addition, sphalerite, galena, cassiterite, and iron–chromium–nickel formations of various shapes were found in the studied particles. The presence of these metals in airborne PM can negatively affect the incidence rate of PM-associated diseases and the determination of their levels are very useful for air pollution prevention strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Health Issues in Occupational Toxicology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

17 pages, 747 KiB  
Review
Toxicology and Microbiota: How Do Pesticides Influence Gut Microbiota? A Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5510; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115510 - 21 May 2021
Cited by 48 | Viewed by 4732
Abstract
In recent years, new targets have been included between the health outcomes induced by pesticide exposure. The gastrointestinal tract is a key physical and biological barrier and it represents a primary site of exposure to toxic agents. Recently, the intestinal microbiota has emerged [...] Read more.
In recent years, new targets have been included between the health outcomes induced by pesticide exposure. The gastrointestinal tract is a key physical and biological barrier and it represents a primary site of exposure to toxic agents. Recently, the intestinal microbiota has emerged as a notable factor regulating pesticides’ toxicity. However, the specific mechanisms related to this interaction are not well known. In this review, we discuss the influence of pesticide exposure on the gut microbiota, discussing the factors influencing gut microbial diversity, and we summarize the updated literature. In conclusion, more studies are needed to clarify the host–microbial relationship concerning pesticide exposure and to define new prevention interventions, such as the identification of biomarkers of mucosal barrier function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Health Issues in Occupational Toxicology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop