Special Issue "Nanomaterials in Oral Science"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2022 | Viewed by 4713

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Akhilesh Rai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: metal nanoparticles; antimicrobial nanoparticles; infection; wound healing; blood–brain barrier; regenerative medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Paulo J. Palma
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute of Endodontics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal
2. Center for Innovation and Research in Oral Sciences (CIROS), Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: biomaterials; endodontics files; endodontics; regenerative tissue; apexification; apical papilla; apical papilla stem cells; calcium silicate–based cements; chitosan; scaffolds; conservative dentistry & endodontics; cyclic fatigue; cyclic fatigue resistance; dental materials; dentistry; dentistry; oral surgery & medicine; endodontic instruments and instrumentation; regenerative endodontics; endodontic biofilms; endodontic microbiology; endodontics; endodontics and restativendodontics; niti files; intrumentation; mineral trioxide aggregate; nanotechnology; niti instruments; regenerative endodontics; regenerative endodontics procedures; revascularization/revitalization; tooth discoloration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials with exciting functional properties are increasingly being used for oral applications. This emerging technology has gained a vast expansion of knowledge in the last few years, especially in terms of the future clinical translation of scientific attainments, driven by new insights in developmental biology, cell and molecular biology of native tissues and oral tissues, and new nanomaterials with biological activities.

Oral research studies have shown that the properties which make nanomaterials useful for prevention, diagnosis, and therapeutic applications may also give rise to potential hazardous outcomes. This recent technology has generated a wave of new developments in the field of dental materials. Nanomaterial-based designs are able to mimic some of the mechanical and structural properties of native tissue and can promote better biointegration. Moreover, nanomaterials may be effective to control oral biofilm formation due to their biocidal, anti-adhesive, and drug delivery capabilities in an attempt to reduce microbial adhesion to oral devices.

Various compositions of nanomaterials have been employed as restorative materials. They have been employed to develop a new generation of restorative composites for treatment but also to prevent new caries, in a minimally invasive way, in the remineralization process.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the current knowledge in contemporary basic and clinical research on applications of nanomaterials in oral science.

These papers especially focus on new nanomaterial approaches in oral sciences, including the synthesis and incorporation of nanomaterials for oral tissue repair, biocompatibility, dental infection, early diagnosis, prevention, and the regeneration of oral tissue, pulp, and periodontal tissue. Other topics include nanobiomaterials as natural bioactive molecules, in vitro and in vivo applications, and the side effects of nanomaterial-coated implants.

On behalf of Nanomaterials, you are cordially invited to contribute an article to the Special Issue “Nanomaterials in Oral Science”. Research articles, reviews, and mini reviews are welcome.


Dr. Akhilesh Rai
Prof. Dr. Paulo J. Palma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanotechnology on oral science
  • Molecular nanosystems
  • Nanomaterials for dental tissue regeneration
  • Nanoparticles for restauration materials
  • Nanomaterials and nanoparticles
  • Nanodentistry
  • Nanostructures (first to fourth generation) applied to oral science
  • Remineralization of hard tissue with nanoparticles
  • Nanotechnology for oral science
  • Nano-endodontics
  • Nano-impression materials
  • Bone substitutes
  • Nanoparticles as tumor biomarkers
  • Nano-diagnostic (photosensitizers and carriers)
  • Nanotherapeutics/drug delivery (size-related) application in oral sciences:
    ○ Endodontics
    ○ Periodontology

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Activity of Fusarium oxysporum-Based Silver Nanoparticles on Candida spp. Oral Isolates
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(3), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12030501 - 31 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 852
Abstract
Candida spp. resistant to commercially available antifungals are often isolated from patients with oral candidiasis, a situation that points to the need for the development of new therapies. Thus, we evaluated the activity of Fusarium oxysporum-based silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Candida spp. [...] Read more.
Candida spp. resistant to commercially available antifungals are often isolated from patients with oral candidiasis, a situation that points to the need for the development of new therapies. Thus, we evaluated the activity of Fusarium oxysporum-based silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Candida spp. isolated from denture stomatitis lesions. Candida isolates were molecularly identified and submitted to susceptibility assays using AgNPs and commercial fungicides. The interference on biofilm formation and the mechanisms of action of AgNPs on Candida spp. were also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the morphology of AgNP-treated Candida. Candida albicans was the most frequent species isolated from denture stomatitis cases. All Candida spp. were susceptible to AgNPs at low concentrations, except Candida parapsilosis. AgNPs caused surface damage, cell disruption, and biofilm formation inhibition. The ergosterol supplementation protected C. albicans against the AgNP action. AgNPs are effective against Candida spp. and can be faced as a promising new therapeutic agent against oral candidiasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Oral Science)
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Article
Effect of Remineralized Collagen on Dentin Bond Strength through Calcium Phosphate Ion Clusters or Metastable Calcium Phosphate Solution
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(11), 2203; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10112203 - 04 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 995
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate whether dentin remineralization and micro-tensile bond strength increase when using calcium phosphate ion clusters (CPICs) or metastable Ca-P. After being etched, each dentin specimen was designated into four groups and treated with the appropriate solution for 1 min: [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate whether dentin remineralization and micro-tensile bond strength increase when using calcium phosphate ion clusters (CPICs) or metastable Ca-P. After being etched, each dentin specimen was designated into four groups and treated with the appropriate solution for 1 min: 100% ethanol, 2 and 1 mg/mL of CPICs, and metastable Ca-P. The specimens were then prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscropy (TEM) imaging, a matrix metalloproteinases inhibition assay, and the micro-tensile bond strength test. To compare among the groups, one-way analysis of variance was performed. In the SEM imaging, with a rising concentration of CPICs, the degree of remineralization of dentin increased significantly. The metastable Ca-P treated specimens showed a similar level of remineralization as the 1 mg/mL CPICs treated specimens. The TEM imaging also revealed that dentin remineralization occurs in a CPICs concentration-dependent manner between the demineralized dentin and the resin layer. Furthermore, the results of micro-tensile bond strength showed the same trend as the results confirmed by SEM and TEM. We demonstrated that a 1 min pretreatment of CPICs or metastable Ca-P in etched dentin collagen fibril can achieve biomimetic remineralization and increase micro-tensile bond strength. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Oral Science)
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Article
Effect of Cleansers on the Colour Stability of Zirconia Impregnated PMMA Bio-Nanocomposite
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(9), 1757; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10091757 - 06 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1137
Abstract
Exposure of denture base acrylic resins to the oral environment and storage media for extended periods of time results in colour change due to changes in the properties of the material. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the colour [...] Read more.
Exposure of denture base acrylic resins to the oral environment and storage media for extended periods of time results in colour change due to changes in the properties of the material. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the colour stability of high-impact heat-polymerized denture base acrylic resin (HI PMMA) impregnated with zirconia nanoparticles after storage in distilled water (DW) and denture cleaners such as Steradent (STD) and Milton (MIL) for 180 days. Ninety specimens of PMMA + Zirconia nanocomposite with varying nanoparticle concentrations (1.5 wt.%, 3.0 wt.%, 5.0 wt.%, 7.0 wt.% and 10 wt.%) were prepared with a diameter and thickness of 25 ± 1.0 mm × 2 ± 0.1 mm and divided into six groups, while each group was further divided into three subgroups: storage in DW (control), STD and MIL. Colour changes were measured with a Minolta Chroma Meter (Minolta, Osaka, Japan), and assessed using the CIE L*a*b* colorimetric system. Data were statistically analysed for colour change with Friedman’s Two-way and Kruskal-Wallis tests at a pre-set alpha value level of 0.05. The colour change (ΔΕ) exhibiting significant differences were found among all groups immersed in denture cleaners, and all values increased with time. According to the National Bureau of Standards, the control group displayed the lowest colour change value (ΔΕ = 1.22), and the highest value was for 10 wt.% ZrO2 while stored in MIL (ΔΕ = 6.07). The values of colour change for storage in water ranged from 0.49 (control) to 1.82 (10 wt.% ZrO2). The colour change value for the composite group containing 3 wt.% zirconia was clinically acceptable. However, high concentrations of denture cleaners should be avoided, and the shortest cleaning time is recommended to improve the clinical life of the nanocomposite denture base. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Oral Science)
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Article
Effect of Fiber Posts on Stress Distribution of Endodontically Treated Upper Premolars: Finite Element Analysis
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(9), 1708; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10091708 - 29 Aug 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1184
Abstract
By means of a finite element method (FEM), the present study evaluated the effect of fiber post (FP) placement on the stress distribution occurring in endodontically treated upper first premolars (UFPs) with mesial–occlusal–distal (MOD) nanohybrid composite restorations under subcritical static load. FEM models [...] Read more.
By means of a finite element method (FEM), the present study evaluated the effect of fiber post (FP) placement on the stress distribution occurring in endodontically treated upper first premolars (UFPs) with mesial–occlusal–distal (MOD) nanohybrid composite restorations under subcritical static load. FEM models were created to simulate four different clinical situations involving endodontically treated UFPs with MOD cavities restored with one of the following: composite resin; composite and one FP in the palatal root; composite and one FP in the buccal root; or composite and two FPs. As control, the model of an intact UFP was included. A simulated load of 150 N was applied. Stress distribution was observed on each model surface, on the mid buccal–palatal plane, and on two horizontal planes (at cervical and root-furcation levels); the maximum Von Mises stress values were calculated. All analyses were replicated three times, using the mechanical parameters from three different nanohybrid resin composite restorative materials. In the presence of FPs, the maximum stress values recorded on dentin (in cervical and root-furcation areas) appeared slightly reduced, compared to the endodontically treated tooth restored with no post; in the same areas, the overall Von Mises maps revealed more favorable stress distributions. FPs in maxillary premolars with MOD cavities can lead to a positive redistribution of potentially dangerous stress concentrations away from the cervical and the root-furcation dentin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Oral Science)
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