Special Issue "Design, Development, and Production of Nanocarriers and Nanovehicles"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Andrés Guerrero-Martínez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Química Física, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: nanoplasmonics; colloid chemistry; supramolecular chemistry; spectroscopy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. José M. Valpuesta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Estructura de Macromoléculas, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología, Madrid, Spain
Interests: Structural biology, cryoelectron microscopy, macromolecules, molecular chaperones

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The bottom-up approach, used by living systems to build up large complex structures from relatively small biological components, constitutes one of the most important strategies that currently drives nanotechnology. In this context, the manipulation of the physico-chemical properties of biomolecules and biomaterials amenable to self-assembly at the nanoscale, is used to develop nanocontainers with the ability to efficiently integrate and load proteins, drugs and genetic material for biomedical purposes. The symposium on “Design, Development and Production of Nanocarriers and Nanovehicles,” organized by the “Spanish Nanobiocargo Consortium,” aims to enable these nanobiotechnological developments in structural biology, biophysics, chemical synthesis, materials physics, or molecular and cellular biology.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to contain the publication of high-quality research articles, as well as reviews, presented during the “Design, Development and Production of Nanocarriers and Nanovehicles” symposium, which seek to address recent achievements in the preparation, characterization and application of nanocontainers, and exciting new developments in related aspects of nanobiotechnology, including future prospects and biomedical challenges.

Dr. Andrés Guerrero-Martínez
Dr. José M. Valpuesta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanocontainers
  • Biopolymers
  • Inorganic nanoparticles
  • Interfacial vehicles
  • Biocolloids
  • Viral capsids
  • Supramolecular polymers
  • Chaperones

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Biogenic Selenium Nanoparticles: A Fine Characterization to Unveil Their Thermodynamic Stability
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1195; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051195 - 01 May 2021
Viewed by 191
Abstract
Among the plethora of available metal(loid) nanomaterials (NMs), those containing selenium are interesting from an applicative perspective, due to their high biocompatibility. Microorganisms capable of coping with toxic Se-oxyanions generate mostly Se nanoparticles (SeNPs), representing an ideal and green alternative over the chemogenic [...] Read more.
Among the plethora of available metal(loid) nanomaterials (NMs), those containing selenium are interesting from an applicative perspective, due to their high biocompatibility. Microorganisms capable of coping with toxic Se-oxyanions generate mostly Se nanoparticles (SeNPs), representing an ideal and green alternative over the chemogenic synthesis to obtain thermodynamically stable NMs. However, their structural characterization, in terms of biomolecules and interactions stabilizing the biogenic colloidal solution, is still a black hole that impairs the exploitation of biogenic SeNP full potential. Here, spherical and thermodynamically stable SeNPs were produced by a metal(loid) tolerant Micrococcus sp. Structural characterization obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) revealed that these SeNPs were surrounded by an organic material that contributed the most to their electrosteric stabilization, as indicated by Zeta (ζ) potential measurements. Proteins were strongly adsorbed on the SeNP surface, while lipids, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids more loosely interacted with SeNMs as highlighted by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and overall supported by multivariate statistical analysis. Nevertheless, all these contributors were fundamental to maintain SeNPs stable, as, upon washing, the NM-containing extract showed the arising of aggregated SeNPs alongside Se nanorods (SeNRs). Besides, Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation unveiled how thiol-containing molecules appeared to play a role in SeO32− bioreduction, stress oxidative response, and SeNP stabilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design, Development, and Production of Nanocarriers and Nanovehicles)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Parametric Optimization of an Air–Liquid Interface System for Flow-Through Inhalation Exposure to Nanoparticles: Assessing Dosimetry and Intracellular Uptake of CeO2 Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2369; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122369 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1091
Abstract
Air–liquid interface (ALI) systems have been widely used in recent years to investigate the inhalation toxicity of many gaseous compounds, chemicals, and nanomaterials and represent an emerging and promising in vitro method to supplement in vivo studies. ALI exposure reflects the physiological conditions [...] Read more.
Air–liquid interface (ALI) systems have been widely used in recent years to investigate the inhalation toxicity of many gaseous compounds, chemicals, and nanomaterials and represent an emerging and promising in vitro method to supplement in vivo studies. ALI exposure reflects the physiological conditions of the deep lung more closely to subacute in vivo inhalation scenarios compared to submerged exposure. The comparability of the toxicological results obtained from in vivo and in vitro inhalation data is still challenging. The robustness of ALI exposure scenarios is not yet well understood, but critical for the potential standardization of these methods. We report a cause-and-effect (C&E) analysis of a flow through ALI exposure system. The influence of five different instrumental and physiological parameters affecting cell viability and exposure parameters of a human lung cell line in vitro (exposure duration, relative humidity, temperature, CO2 concentration and flow rate) was investigated. After exposing lung epithelia cells to a CeO2 nanoparticle (NP) aerosol, intracellular CeO2 concentrations reached values similar to those found in a recent subacute rat inhalation study in vivo. This is the first study showing that the NP concentration reached in vitro using a flow through ALI system were the same as those in an in vivo study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design, Development, and Production of Nanocarriers and Nanovehicles)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Chaperonins: Nanocarriers with Biotechnological Applications
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 503; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020503 - 17 Feb 2021
Viewed by 582
Abstract
Chaperonins are molecular chaperones found in all kingdoms of life, and as such they assist in the folding of other proteins. Structurally, chaperonins are cylinders composed of two back-to-back rings, each of which is an oligomer of ~60-kDa proteins. Chaperonins are found in [...] Read more.
Chaperonins are molecular chaperones found in all kingdoms of life, and as such they assist in the folding of other proteins. Structurally, chaperonins are cylinders composed of two back-to-back rings, each of which is an oligomer of ~60-kDa proteins. Chaperonins are found in two main conformations, one in which the cavity is open and ready to recognise and trap unfolded client proteins, and a “closed” form in which folding takes place. The conspicuous properties of this structure (a cylinder containing a cavity that allows confinement) and the potential to control its closure and aperture have inspired a number of nanotechnological applications that will be described in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design, Development, and Production of Nanocarriers and Nanovehicles)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop