Special Issue "Advanced Materials for Aerospace: Polymer Nanocomposites"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mauro Zarrelli
Website
Guest Editor
IPCB - Institute of Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, CNR –National Research Council of Italy - UOS Napoli/Portici-National Research Council, Portici, Italy
Interests: polymer composite for aerospace application (kinetics, rheology, mechanical property); nanocomposite (MWCNT reinforced epoxy); electrical, mechanical, and thermal property; percolation of CNT in polymer matrix; degradation and fire behavior; fire resistance; processing technologies of composite materials
Dr. Anna Borriello
Website
Guest Editor
IPCB - Institute of Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, CNR –National Research Council of Italy - UOS Napoli/Portici-National Research Council, Portici, Italy
Interests: design, synthesis, study of proprieties, and engineering of polymeric systems. Current emphases include: Electrically conductive polymers; nanofillers in polymer composite polymer electrolyte membranes; bio-inspired materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last three decades, the availability of a different typology of nanoparticles has increased enormously, giving a concrete chance to develop tunable materials for specific structural and functional applications.

Adding nanoparticles to a polymer matrix can enhance its performance, at the same time tailoring specific properties. This approach is particularly effective in applications for which specific functionalities are needed, such as conductive polymer, enhanced thermal conductive matrix, high performance composites, functional coating, nanocomposite foams or “smart” materials for sensing.

This Special Issue, titled: Advanced Materials for Aerospace: Polymer Nanocomposites”, within the Nanomaterials Journal of MDPI, aims to publish original research, which will add knowledge to the current understanding on polymer nanocomposites, including fundamental structure/property relationships, property characterization, and numerical modeling and manufacturing techniques. At the same, review work reporting the current state of the art for a specific feature of polymer nanocomposites with main interests for aeronautical and space applications is welcome.

Dr. Mauro Zarrelli
Dr. Anna Borriello
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymer nanocomposites
  • Hierarchical composites
  • Nanofillers
  • Processing nanocomposites
  • Sensing nanocomposite
  • Smart nanocomposites
  • Synthesis of nanofiller
  • Multifunctional of nanocomposites
  • Structural property
  • Simulation and modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aromatic Hyperbranched Polyester/RTM6 Epoxy Resin for EXTREME Dynamic Loading Aeronautical Applications
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020188 - 22 Jan 2020
Abstract
The effects of the addition of an aromatic hyperbranched polyester (AHBP) on thermal, mechanical, and fracture toughness properties of a thermosetting resin system were investigated. AHBP filler, synthesized by using a bulk poly-condensation reaction, reveals a glassy state at room temperature. Indeed, according [...] Read more.
The effects of the addition of an aromatic hyperbranched polyester (AHBP) on thermal, mechanical, and fracture toughness properties of a thermosetting resin system were investigated. AHBP filler, synthesized by using a bulk poly-condensation reaction, reveals a glassy state at room temperature. Indeed, according to differential scanning calorimetry measurements, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of AHBP is 95 °C. Three different adduct weight percentages were employed to manufacture the AHBP/epoxy samples, respectively, 0.1, 1, and 5 wt%. Dynamical Mechanical Analysis tests revealed that the addition of AHBP induces a negligible variation in terms of conservative modulus, whereas a slight Tg reduction of about 4 °C was observed at 5 wt% of filler content. Fracture toughness results showed an improvement of both critical stress intensity factor (+18%) and critical strain energy release rate (+83%) by adding 5 wt% of AHBP compared to the neat epoxy matrix. Static and dynamic compression tests covering strain rates ranging from 0.0008 to 1000 s−1 revealed a pronounced strain rate sensitivity for all AHBP/epoxy systems. The AHBP composites all showed an increase of the true peak yield compressive strength with the best improvement associated with the sample with 0.1 wt% of AHBP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Aerospace: Polymer Nanocomposites)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Hybridized Carbon Nanotubes, Silica Nanoparticles, and Core-Shell Rubber on Tensile, Fracture Mechanics and Electrical Properties of Epoxy Nanocomposites
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 1057; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9071057 - 23 Jul 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The paper investigates the effect of adding a combination of rigid nanoparticles and core-shell rubber nanoparticles on the tensile, fracture mechanics, electrical and thermo-mechanical properties of epoxy resins. SiO2 nanoparticles, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT’s), as rigid nanofillers, and core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles, [...] Read more.
The paper investigates the effect of adding a combination of rigid nanoparticles and core-shell rubber nanoparticles on the tensile, fracture mechanics, electrical and thermo-mechanical properties of epoxy resins. SiO2 nanoparticles, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT’s), as rigid nanofillers, and core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles, as soft nanofillers were used with bisphenol-A-based epoxy resin. Further, the rigid fillers were added systematically with core-shell rubber nanoparticles to investigate the commingled effect of rigid nanofillers and soft CSR nanoparticles. The resulting matrix will be broadly evaluated by standard methods to quantify tensile, fracture mechanics, electrical, and thermal properties. The results show that the electrical conductivity threshold is obtained at 0.075 wt. % for MWCNT-modified systems. For hybrid systems, the maximum increase of fracture toughness (218%) and fracture energy (900%) was obtained for a system containing 5 wt. % of CSR and 10 wt. % of SiO2. The analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed the information about existing toughening micro-mechanisms in the nanocomposites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Aerospace: Polymer Nanocomposites)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrically Conductive CNT Composites at Loadings below Theoretical Percolation Values
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040491 - 29 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
It is well established that dramatic increases in conductivity occur upon the addition of conductive filler materials to highly resistive polymeric matrices in experimental settings. However, the mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior at low filler loadings, below theoretical percolation limits, of even [...] Read more.
It is well established that dramatic increases in conductivity occur upon the addition of conductive filler materials to highly resistive polymeric matrices in experimental settings. However, the mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior at low filler loadings, below theoretical percolation limits, of even high aspect ratio fillers such as carbon nanotubes (CNT) are not completely understood. In this study, conductive composites were fabricated using CNT bundles dispersed in epoxy resins at diverse loadings, using different dispersion and curing protocols. Based on electron microscopy observation of the CNTs strands distribution in the polymeric matrices and the corresponding electrical conductivities of those specimens, we concluded that no single electron transfer model can accurately explain the conductive behavior for all the loading values. We propose the existence of two different conductive mechanisms; one that exists close to the percolation limit, from ‘low loadings’ to higher CNT contents (CNT % wt > 0.1) and a second for ‘extremely low loadings’, near the percolation threshold (CNT % wt < 0.1). The high conductivity observed for composites at low CNT loading values can be explained by the existence of a percolative CNT network that coexists with micron size regions of non-conductive material. In contrast, samples with extremely low CNT loading values, which present no connectivity or close proximity between CNT bundles, show an electrical conductivity characterized by a current/voltage dependence. Data suggests that at these loadings, conduction may occur via a material breakdown mechanism, similar to dielectric breakdown in a capacitor. The lessons learned from the data gathered in here could guide future experimental research aimed to control the conductivity of CNT composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Aerospace: Polymer Nanocomposites)
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