Special Issue "Green Nanotechnologies for Water Remediation Processes"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Tito Trindade
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Guest Editor
Chemistry Department and CICECO- Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: inorganic nanoparticles; quantum dots; Raman spectroscopy; magnetic nanosorbents; surface chemistry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ana Luísa Daniel da Silva
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: bionanocomposites; hydrogels; inorganic nanoparticles; nanosorbents; magnetic separation; surface functionalization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The sustainable use of water resources and the application of technologies that ensure water supply for future generations are important challenges facing today's society, and, in particular, by the scientific community. There has been remarkable progress in nanotechnologies showing potential for water treatment and quality monitoring applications. This Special Issue is dedicated to this theme; more specifically, to developments in the synthesis, surface modification and properties of nanomaterials for various nanotechnologies associated with water quality analysis and purification. Examples of topics in line with the themes of this issue comprise the chemistry of nanosorbents, photocatalysis in water treatments, nanosensors for monitoring the chemical composition of water and the evaluation of the impact of nanomaterials on natural water resources.

Prof. Dr. Tito Trindade
Dr. Ana Luísa Daniel da Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanomaterials
  • Water quality
  • Green chemistry
  • Adsorption
  • Nanosorbents
  • Photocatalysis
  • Environmental monitoring

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Porous Carrageenan-Derived Carbons for Efficient Ciprofloxacin Removal from Water
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(12), 1004; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8121004 - 04 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Porous carbon materials derived from biopolymers are attractive sorbents for the removal of emerging pollutants from water, due to their high specific surface area, high porosity, tunable surface chemistry, and reasonable cost. However, carrageenan biopolymers were scarcely investigated as a carbon source to [...] Read more.
Porous carbon materials derived from biopolymers are attractive sorbents for the removal of emerging pollutants from water, due to their high specific surface area, high porosity, tunable surface chemistry, and reasonable cost. However, carrageenan biopolymers were scarcely investigated as a carbon source to prepare porous carbon materials. Herein, hydrochars (HCs) and porous activated carbons (ACs) derived from natural occurring polysaccharides with variable sulfate content (κ-, ι- and λ-carrageenan) were prepared and investigated in the uptake of ciprofloxacin, which is an antibiotic detected in water sources and that poses serious hazards to public health. The materials were prepared using hydrothermal carbonization and subsequent chemical activation with KOH to increase the available surface area. The activated carbons were markedly microporous, presenting high specific surface area, up to 2800 m2/g. Activated carbons derived from κ- and λ-carrageenan showed high adsorption capacity (422 and 459 mg/g, respectively) for ciprofloxacin and fast adsorption kinetics, reaching the sorption equilibrium in approximately 5 min. These features place the ACs investigated here among the best systems reported in the literature for the removal of ciprofloxacin from water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Nanotechnologies for Water Remediation Processes)
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Open AccessArticle
Ligand-Free Nano-Au Catalysts on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Filter for Continuous Flow Catalysis
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(9), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8090688 - 05 Sep 2018
Abstract
In this study, the authors rationally designed a high-performance catalytic filter for continuous flow catalysis. The catalytic filter consisted of ligand-free nanoscale gold (nano-Au) catalysts and nitrogen-doped graphene (N-rGO). The Au catalyst was fabricated in situ onto a pre-formed N-rGO support by the [...] Read more.
In this study, the authors rationally designed a high-performance catalytic filter for continuous flow catalysis. The catalytic filter consisted of ligand-free nanoscale gold (nano-Au) catalysts and nitrogen-doped graphene (N-rGO). The Au catalyst was fabricated in situ onto a pre-formed N-rGO support by the NaBH4 reduction of the Au precursor, and the size of the nano-Au was fine-tuned. A hydrothermal pretreatment of graphene oxide enriched nitrogen-containing species on the surface of two-dimensional graphene supports and enhanced the affinity of Au precursors onto the support via electrocatalytic attraction. The nano-Au catalysts acted as high-performance catalysts, and the N-rGO acted as ideal filter materials to anchor the catalysts. The catalytic activity of the as-designed catalytic filter was evaluated using 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) hydrogenation as a model catalytic reaction. The catalytic filters demonstrated superior catalytic activity and excellent stability, where a complete 4-nitrophenol conversion was readily achieved via a single pass through the catalytic filter. The as-fabricated catalytic filter outperformed the conventional batch reactors due to evidently improved mass transport. Some key operational parameters impacting the catalytic performance were identified and optimized. A similar catalytic performance was also observed for three 4-nitrophenol spiked real water samples (e.g., surface water, tap water, and industrial dyeing wastewater). The excellent catalytic activity of the nano-Au catalysts combined with the two-dimensional and mechanically stable graphene allowed for the rational design of various continuous flow catalytic membranes for potential industrial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Nanotechnologies for Water Remediation Processes)
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Open AccessArticle
Green and Effective Removal of Aqueous Graphene Oxide under UV-Light Irradiation
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(9), 654; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8090654 - 24 Aug 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
The potential extensive application of graphene oxide (GO) in various fields results in the possibility of its release into the natural environment with negative impacts on humans and the ecosystem. The UV-induced removal behavior of aqueous GO was evaluated in this study, and [...] Read more.
The potential extensive application of graphene oxide (GO) in various fields results in the possibility of its release into the natural environment with negative impacts on humans and the ecosystem. The UV-induced removal behavior of aqueous GO was evaluated in this study, and the effect of various parameters (including initial GO concentration, initial solution pH and co-existing ions) on removal rate of GO were investigated in detail. The results showed that UV-light induced a maximum removal rate of GO of 99.1% after 32 h irradiation without any additives, and that the photo-induced removal process in all cases fitted well with pseudo-first-order kinetics. Under optimal conditions, GO was completely removed, with initial GO concentrations of 10 mg/L while adjusting solution pH to 3 or adding Ca2+-containing salt. The GO and photoreduced graphene oxide (prGO) were characterized using High-resolution Transmission Microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). The radical species trapping experiments and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) tests indicated that self-reduction of GO upon UV-light exposure could be achieved via photogenerated electrons from a GO semiconductor. Further mechanism study showed that the high efficiency of UV-induced GO removal came from UV-induced photoreduction, and pH-induced or cation-induced coagulation. This study provided a green and effective method to remove GO from aqueous solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Nanotechnologies for Water Remediation Processes)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimal Hydrogen Production Coupled with Pollutant Removal from Biodiesel Wastewater Using a Thermally Treated TiO2 Photocatalyst (P25): Influence of the Operating Conditions
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(2), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8020096 - 09 Feb 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
This work aimed to produce hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with pollutant removal from biodiesel wastewater by photocatalytic oxidation using a thermally-treated commercial titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst at room temperature (~30 °C) and ambient pressure. The effects of the operating conditions, [...] Read more.
This work aimed to produce hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with pollutant removal from biodiesel wastewater by photocatalytic oxidation using a thermally-treated commercial titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst at room temperature (~30 °C) and ambient pressure. The effects of the operating conditions, including the catalyst loading level (1–6 g/L), UV light intensity (3.52–6.64 mW/cm2), initial pH of the wastewater (2.3–8.0) and reaction time (1–4 h), on the quantity of H2 production together with the reduction in the chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD) and oil and grease levels were explored. It was found that all the investigated parameters affected the level of H2 production and pollutant removal. The optimum operating condition for simultaneous H2 production and pollutant removal was found at an initial wastewater pH of 6.0, a catalyst dosage of 4.0 g/L, a UV light intensity of 4.79 mW/cm2 and a reaction time of 2 h. These conditions led to the production of 228 μmol H2 with a light conversion efficiency of 6.78% and reduced the COD, BOD and oil and grease levels by 13.2%, 89.6% and 67.7%, respectively. The rate of pollutant removal followed a pseudo-first order chemical reaction with a rate constant of 0.008, 0.085 and 0.044 min−1 for the COD, BOD and oil and grease removal, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Nanotechnologies for Water Remediation Processes)
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