molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advances in Nanomaterials for Bioapplications and Water Treatment"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ana Luísa Daniel da Silva
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: bionanocomposites; hydrogels; inorganic nanoparticles; nanosorbents; magnetic separation; surface functionalization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials, in addition to their small size and increased surface area, possess unique physicochemical properties that enable specific applications that cannot be performed by either molecular species or bulk materials. In the past few years, we have witnessed significant advancements that demonstrate the advantages of colloidal nanomaterials for biomedical and water treatment applications. The intrinsic optical, magnetic, and electrical properties of inorganic nanoparticles can be tuned by engineering the size and shape of the inorganic core towards sensitive imaging in medicine and achieving the most effective therapeutic effects. The nanomaterials possessing specific surface chemistry and wettability are of high relevance for water treatment and contaminated site remediation. This Special Issue on ”Advances in Nanomaterials for Bioapplications and Water Treatment” aims to address the main successes and challenges in developing functional nanomaterials, not only regarding the chemical synthesis, surface functionalization, and characterization, but also in designing their functional properties for practical applications. Some examples of the topics within the scope of this Issue include the chemistry of nanosorbents, photocatalysis for water treatment, nanocarriers in medical diagnostics and drug delivery, and nanoenabled bioseparation.

Dr. Ana Luísa Daniel da Silva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanosorbents
  • photocatalysts
  • nanomedicine
  • nanocarriers
  • drug delivery
  • diagnosis
  • hyperthermia
  • bioseparation

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Magnetic Driven Nanocarriers for pH-Responsive Doxorubicin Release in Cancer Therapy
Molecules 2020, 25(2), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25020333 (registering DOI) - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Doxorubicin is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs, but side effects and selectivity problems create a demand for alternative drug delivery systems. Herein we describe a hybrid magnetic nanomaterial as a pH-dependent doxorubicin release carrier. This nanocarrier comprises magnetic iron oxide [...] Read more.
Doxorubicin is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs, but side effects and selectivity problems create a demand for alternative drug delivery systems. Herein we describe a hybrid magnetic nanomaterial as a pH-dependent doxorubicin release carrier. This nanocarrier comprises magnetic iron oxide cores with a diameter of 10 nm, enveloped in a hybrid material made of siliceous shells and ĸ-carrageenan. The hybrid shells possess high drug loading capacity and a favorable drug release profile, while the iron oxide cores allows easy manipulation via an external magnetic field. The pH responsiveness was assessed in phosphate buffers at pH levels equivalent to those of blood (pH 7.4) and tumor microenvironment (pH 4.2 and 5). The nanoparticles have a loading capacity of up to 12.3 wt.% and a release profile of 80% in 5 h at acidic pH versus 25% at blood pH. In vitro drug delivery tests on human breast cancer and non-cancer cellular cultures have shown that, compared to the free drug, the loaded nanocarriers have comparable antiproliferative effect but a less intense cytotoxic effect, especially in the non-cancer cell line. The results show a clear potential for these new hybrid nanomaterials as alternative drug carriers for doxorubicin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomaterials for Bioapplications and Water Treatment)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop