Special Issue "Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Nanomedicine"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Joaquim Miguel Oliveira

3B's Research Group - Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Avepark – Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, 4805-017 Barco GMR-Portugal; ICVS/3B’s - PT Government Associated Laboratory, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +351 253 510931
Fax: +351 253 510909
Interests: nanobiomaterials; nanomedicine; theranostics; tissue engineering; 3D printing; 3D in vitro tissue models of disease
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rui L. Reis

University of Minho, I3B's - Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, Guimarães, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural origin materials; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; stem cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The convergence of the regenerative principles in Nanomedicine and Tissue Engineering promise to create new avenues in Regenerative Medicine. It is now recognized the great advantages of using nanomaterials for controlled drug delivery, scaffolding, sensing and imaging applications. Emerging engineering strategies possibly synthesizing nanosystems with different compositions and architectures. Multi-modal nanomaterials are now being designed by means of incorporating different stimuli-responsive functionalities, peptides, antibodies and imaging probes towards targeting specific cells, tissues and organs while offering the possibility to track its fate in real-time.

This Special Issue focus on the most recent advances related to the design of different nanobiomaterials, functionalization strategies, processing methods, biological performance assessment and safety, and its applications for theranostics of cancer, musculoskeletal and neurodegenerative diseases/disorders.

Submissions can cover the following topics (but are not limited to them):

·         Design, synthesis and functionalization of nanobiomaterials

·         Formulation and processing of nanomaterials

·         Strategies combining nanoparticles and emerging technologies (e.g. microfluidics)

·         Pre-clinical characterization of nanomaterials

·         Nanoparticles for imaging and diagnosis

·         Applications of nanomaterials in theranostics of cancer, musculoskeletal and neurodegenerative diseases/disorders.

Prof. Dr. Joaquim Miguel  Oliveira
Prof. Dr. Rui L.  Reis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Imaging
  • Musculoskeletal
  • Nanobiomaterials
  • Neurosciences
  • Processing methods
  • Nanomedicine
  • Tissue engineering

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Gadolinium Tagged Osteoprotegerin-Mimicking Peptide: A Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Biospecific Contrast Agent for the Inhibition of Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060399
Received: 17 April 2018 / Revised: 25 May 2018 / Accepted: 28 May 2018 / Published: 2 June 2018
PDF Full-text (4511 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The control of osteoblast/osteoclast cross-talk is crucial in the bone remodelling process and provides a target mechanism in the development of drugs for bone metabolic diseases. Osteoprotegerin is a key molecule in this biosignalling pathway as it inhibits osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation to
[...] Read more.
The control of osteoblast/osteoclast cross-talk is crucial in the bone remodelling process and provides a target mechanism in the development of drugs for bone metabolic diseases. Osteoprotegerin is a key molecule in this biosignalling pathway as it inhibits osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation to prevent run-away bone resorption. This work reports the synthesis of a known osteoprotegerin peptide analogue, YCEIEFCYLIR (OP3-4), and its tagging with a gadolinium chelate, a standard contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. The resulting contrast agent allows the simultaneous imaging and treatment of metabolic bone diseases. The gadolinium-tagged peptide was successfully synthesised, showing unaltered magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent properties, a lack of cytotoxicity, and dose-dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. These findings pave the way toward the development of biospecific and bioactive contrast agents for the early diagnosis, treatment, and follow up of metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis and osteosarcoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Biofunctionalized Lysophosphatidic Acid/Silk Fibroin Film for Cornea Endothelial Cell Regeneration
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(5), 290; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8050290
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 25 April 2018 / Accepted: 25 April 2018 / Published: 30 April 2018
PDF Full-text (4090 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cornea endothelial cells (CEnCs) tissue engineering is a great challenge to repair diseased or damaged CEnCs and require an appropriate biomaterial to support cell proliferation and differentiation. Biomaterials for CEnCs tissue engineering require biocompatibility, tunable biodegradability, transparency, and suitable mechanical properties. Silk fibroin-based
[...] Read more.
Cornea endothelial cells (CEnCs) tissue engineering is a great challenge to repair diseased or damaged CEnCs and require an appropriate biomaterial to support cell proliferation and differentiation. Biomaterials for CEnCs tissue engineering require biocompatibility, tunable biodegradability, transparency, and suitable mechanical properties. Silk fibroin-based film (SF) is known to meet these factors, but construction of functionalized graft for bioengineering of cornea is still a challenge. Herein, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is used to maintain and increase the specific function of CEnCs. The LPA and SF composite film (LPA/SF) was fabricated in this study. Mechanical properties and in vitro studies were performed using a rabbit model to demonstrate the characters of LPA/SF. ATR-FTIR was characterized to identify chemical composition of the films. The morphological and physical properties were performed by SEM, AFM, transparency, and contact angle. Initial cell density and MTT were performed for adhesion and cell viability in the SF and LPA/SF film. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence were performed to examine gene and protein expression. The results showed that films were designed appropriately for CEnCs delivery. Compared to pristine SF, LPA/SF showed higher biocompatibility, cell viability, and expression of CEnCs specific genes and proteins. These indicate that LPA/SF, a new biomaterial, offers potential benefits for CEnCs tissue engineering for regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Porcine Dental Epithelial Cells Differentiated in a Cell Sheet Constructed by Magnetic Nanotechnology
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7100322
Received: 14 September 2017 / Revised: 7 October 2017 / Accepted: 9 October 2017 / Published: 13 October 2017
PDF Full-text (7921 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used in medical examinations, treatments, and basic research, including magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering. In this study, MNPs with magnetic force were applied to tissue engineering for dental enamel regeneration. The internalization of MNPs
[...] Read more.
Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used in medical examinations, treatments, and basic research, including magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering. In this study, MNPs with magnetic force were applied to tissue engineering for dental enamel regeneration. The internalization of MNPs into the odontogenic cells was observed by transmission electron microscopy. A combined cell sheet consisting of dental epithelial cells (DECs) and dental mesenchymal cells (DMCs) (CC sheet) was constructed using magnetic force-based tissue engineering technology. The result of the iron staining indicated that MNPs were distributed ubiquitously over the CC sheet. mRNA expression of enamel differentiation and basement membrane markers was examined in the CC sheet. Immunostaining showed Collagen IV expression at the border region between DEC and DMC layers in the CC sheet. These results revealed that epithelial–mesenchymal interactions between DEC and DMC layers were caused by bringing DECs close to DMCs mechanically by magnetic force. Our study suggests that the microenvironment in the CC sheet might be similar to that during the developmental stage of a tooth bud. In conclusion, a CC sheet employing MNPs could be developed as a novel and unique graft for artificially regenerating dental enamel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle The Bioactivity and Photocatalytic Properties of Titania Nanotube Coatings Produced with the Use of the Low-Potential Anodization of Ti6Al4V Alloy Surface
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(8), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7080197
Received: 6 July 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 21 July 2017 / Published: 26 July 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (10000 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Titania nanotube (TNT) coatings were produced using low-potential anodic oxidation of Ti6Al4V substrates in the potential range 3–20 V. They were analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The wettability was estimated by measuring
[...] Read more.
Titania nanotube (TNT) coatings were produced using low-potential anodic oxidation of Ti6Al4V substrates in the potential range 3–20 V. They were analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The wettability was estimated by measuring the contact angle when applying water droplets. The bioactivity of the TNT coatings was established on the basis of the biointegration assay (L929 murine fibroblasts adhesion and proliferation) and antibacterial tests against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213). The photocatalytic efficiency of the TNT films was studied by the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. Among the studied coatings, the TiO2 nanotubes obtained with the use of 5 V potential (TNT5) were found to be the most appropriate for medical applications. The TNT5 sample possessed antibiofilm properties without enriching it by additional antimicrobial agent. Furthermore, it was characterized by optimal biocompatibility, performing better than pure Ti6Al4V alloy. Moreover, the same sample was the most photocatalytically active and exhibited the potential for the sterilization of implants with the use of UV light and for other environmental applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Protein-Based Fiber Materials in Medicine: A Review
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(7), 457; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8070457
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 20 June 2018 / Published: 22 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4799 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fibrous materials have garnered much interest in the field of biomedical engineering due to their high surface-area-to-volume ratio, porosity, and tunability. Specifically, in the field of tissue engineering, fiber meshes have been used to create biomimetic nanostructures that allow for cell attachment, migration,
[...] Read more.
Fibrous materials have garnered much interest in the field of biomedical engineering due to their high surface-area-to-volume ratio, porosity, and tunability. Specifically, in the field of tissue engineering, fiber meshes have been used to create biomimetic nanostructures that allow for cell attachment, migration, and proliferation, to promote tissue regeneration and wound healing, as well as controllable drug delivery. In addition to the properties of conventional, synthetic polymer fibers, fibers made from natural polymers, such as proteins, can exhibit enhanced biocompatibility, bioactivity, and biodegradability. Of these proteins, keratin, collagen, silk, elastin, zein, and soy are some the most common used in fiber fabrication. The specific capabilities of these materials have been shown to vary based on their physical properties, as well as their fabrication method. To date, such fabrication methods include electrospinning, wet/dry jet spinning, dry spinning, centrifugal spinning, solution blowing, self-assembly, phase separation, and drawing. This review serves to provide a basic knowledge of these commonly utilized proteins and methods, as well as the fabricated fibers’ applications in biomedical research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Graphene-Based Nanomaterials for Tissue Engineering in the Dental Field
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(5), 349; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8050349
Received: 3 May 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 20 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3734 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The world of dentistry is approaching graphene-based nanomaterials as substitutes for tissue engineering. Apart from its exceptional mechanical strength, electrical conductivity and thermal stability, graphene and its derivatives can be functionalized with several bioactive molecules. They can also be incorporated into different scaffolds
[...] Read more.
The world of dentistry is approaching graphene-based nanomaterials as substitutes for tissue engineering. Apart from its exceptional mechanical strength, electrical conductivity and thermal stability, graphene and its derivatives can be functionalized with several bioactive molecules. They can also be incorporated into different scaffolds used in regenerative dentistry, generating nanocomposites with improved characteristics. This review presents the state of the art of graphene-based nanomaterial applications in the dental field. We first discuss the interactions between cells and graphene, summarizing the available in vitro and in vivo studies concerning graphene biocompatibility and cytotoxicity. We then highlight the role of graphene-based nanomaterials in stem cell control, in terms of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Particular attention will be given to stem cells of dental origin, such as those isolated from dental pulp, periodontal ligament or dental follicle. The review then discusses the interactions between graphene-based nanomaterials with cells of the immune system; we also focus on the antibacterial activity of graphene nanomaterials. In the last section, we offer our perspectives on the various opportunities facing the use of graphene and its derivatives in associations with titanium dental implants, membranes for bone regeneration, resins, cements and adhesives as well as for tooth-whitening procedures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Nanomedicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top