Special Issue "Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology for Regenerative Medicine"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Junghwan Lee
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, S.Korea
Interests: nanomaterials; functional biomaterials; cell reprograming; mechanotransduction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanosized biomaterials exhibit many interesting features, such as a high surface area and mechanophysical tunability, which possibly mimics the natural extracellular matrix. Thus, nano-biomaterials with diverse functionality can be engineered in various types of architectures, such as nanoparticles, nanofiber, 2D film, porous 3D scaffolds, hydrogels, and their composites from the latest nanotechnology. Nanomaterials and nanotechnology are extremely helpful in accelerating drug/biomolecule delivery ability and myriad cellular response, including proliferation, migration, and differentiation for the repair and regeneration of specific tissues, such as bone, cartilage, nerve, muscle, etc. with great biocompatibility Thus, we invite research, review, or communications papers with a broad range of nanomaterials and nanotechnology for regenerative medicine.

Dr. Junghwan Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional nanoparticles
  • biomaterials
  • regenerative medicine
  • immunomodulation
  • mechanotransduction
  • preclinical test
  • biocompatibility

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Antibacterial and Osteogenic Activity of Titania Nanotubes Modified with Electrospray-Deposited Tetracycline Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1093; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061093 - 01 Jun 2020
Abstract
The nanotubular surface of titanium implants is known to have superior osteogenic activity but is also vulnerable to failure because of induced bacterial attachment and consequent secondary infection. Here, the problem was attempted to be solved by depositing nanosized tetracycline (TC)-loaded particles in [...] Read more.
The nanotubular surface of titanium implants is known to have superior osteogenic activity but is also vulnerable to failure because of induced bacterial attachment and consequent secondary infection. Here, the problem was attempted to be solved by depositing nanosized tetracycline (TC)-loaded particles in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) on titania nanotubes (TNTs) using the electrospray deposition method. The antibacterial effect of the newly formed TNT surface was considered using the common pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Maintenance of the biocompatibility and osteogenic characteristics of TNTs has been tested through cytotoxicity tests and osteogenic gene expression/extra-cellular matrix mineralization, respectively. The results showed that TNTs were successfully formed by anodization, and the characterization of TC deposited on the TNTs was controlled by varying the spraying parameters such as particle size and coating time. The TC nanoparticle-coated TNTs showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and biocompatibility with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, while the osteogenic activity of the TNT structure was preserved, as demonstrated by osteocalcin and osteopontin gene expression, as well as Alizarin red staining. Hence, this study concluded that the electrosprayed TC coating of TNTs is a simple and effective method for the formation of bactericidal implants that can maintain osteogenic activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology for Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Incorporating Aminated Nanodiamonds to Improve the Mechanical Properties of 3D-Printed Resin-Based Biomedical Appliances
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050827 - 26 Apr 2020
Abstract
The creation of clinically patient-specific 3D-printed biomedical appliances that can withstand the physical stresses of the complex biological environment is an important objective. To that end, this study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of aminated nanodiamonds (A-NDs) as nanofillers in biological-grade acrylate-based 3D-printed [...] Read more.
The creation of clinically patient-specific 3D-printed biomedical appliances that can withstand the physical stresses of the complex biological environment is an important objective. To that end, this study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of aminated nanodiamonds (A-NDs) as nanofillers in biological-grade acrylate-based 3D-printed materials. Solution-based mixing was used to incorporate 0.1 wt% purified nanodiamond (NDs) and A-NDs into UV-polymerized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The ND and A-ND nanocomposites showed significantly lower water contact angles (p < 0.001) and solubilities (p < 0.05) compared to those of the control. Both nanocomposites showed markedly improved mechanical properties, with the A-ND-containing nanocomposite showing a statistically significant increase in the flexural strength (p < 0.001), elastic modulus (p < 0.01), and impact strength (p < 0.001) compared to the control and ND-containing groups. The Vickers hardness and wear-resistance values of the A-ND-incorporated material were significantly higher (p < 0.001) than those of the control and were comparable to the values observed for the ND-containing group. In addition, trueness analysis was used to verify that 3D-printed orthodontic brackets prepared with the A-ND- and ND-nanocomposites exhibited no significant differences in accuracy. Hence, we conclude that the successful incorporation of 0.1 wt% A-ND in UV-polymerized PMMA resin significantly improves the mechanical properties of the resin for the additive manufacturing of precisive 3D-printed biomedical appliances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology for Regenerative Medicine)
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