Special Issue "Nanoscale Electrical Characterization of Low Dimensional Materials for Electronics"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Filippo Giannazzo

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche –Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Strada VIII, 5 I-95121 Catania, Italy
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Interests: graphene, 2D materials, wide-bandgap semiconductors (SiC, GaN), high power and high frequency electronics, scanning probe microscopy
Guest Editor
Dr. Umberto Celano

Interuniversitair Micro-Electronica Centrum (IMEC), Leuven Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanoelectronics, functional nanomaterials, 2D materials, VLSI metrology, scanning probe microscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Low dimensional materials (including the broad family of 2D materials, 1D nanotube or nanowires and 0 D quantum dots) are currently gaining increasing interest in electronics/optoelectronics, as they allow us to extend the performance of traditional semiconductor devices or to demonstrate completely new device concepts and exciting physics.

In this context, combining nanometric spatial resolution with a wide range of physical properties that can be detected, scanning-probe-based characterization techniques have proved themselves to be essential tools to investigate the structural, electrical, chemical and optical properties of low dimensional systems and their heterojunctions with bulk (3D) semiconductors.

This Special Issue will be devoted to new developments in nanoscale electrical characterization techniques, and their applications to the analysis of low dimensional materials, including (i) synthesis, (ii) integration and (iii) novel device architectures. The Special Issue is open to correlation studies of local electrical/optical measurements with high resolution structural/chemical analyses, as well as to theoretical and modelling works for the interpretation of experimental results in these nanoscale systems.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, short communications, and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Filippo Giannazzo
Dr. Umberto Celano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Scanning Probe Microscopy
  • Scanning Tunneling Microscopy
  • Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy
  • Scanning Capacitance Microscopy
  • Scanning Microwave Impedance Microscopy
  • Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy
  • Scanning Near Field Optical Microscopy
  • 2D Materials
  • Nanowires
  • Quantum dots

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Piezoresistive Behavior on Electron Emission from Individual Silicon Carbide Nanowire
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 981; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070981
Received: 15 June 2019 / Revised: 2 July 2019 / Accepted: 2 July 2019 / Published: 6 July 2019
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Abstract
The excellent properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make it widely applied in high-voltage, high-power, and high-temperature electronic devices. SiC nanowires combine the excellent physical properties of SiC material and the advantages of nanoscale structures, thus attracting significant attention from researchers. Herein, the electron [...] Read more.
The excellent properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make it widely applied in high-voltage, high-power, and high-temperature electronic devices. SiC nanowires combine the excellent physical properties of SiC material and the advantages of nanoscale structures, thus attracting significant attention from researchers. Herein, the electron vacuum tunneling emission characteristics of an individual SiC nanowire affected by the piezoresistive effect are investigated using in situ electric measurement in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) chamber. The results demonstrate that the piezoresistive effect caused by the electrostatic force has a significant impact on the electronic transport properties of the nanowire, and the excellent electron emission characteristics can be achieved in the pulse voltage driving mode, including lower turn-on voltage and higher maximum current. Furthermore, a physical model about the piezoresistive effect of SiC nanowire is proposed to explain the transformation of electronic transport under the action of electrostatic force in DC voltage and pulsed voltage driving modes. The findings can provide a way to obtain excellent electron emission characteristics from SiC nanowires. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Pinch-Off Formation in Monolayer and Multilayers MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 882; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060882
Received: 7 May 2019 / Revised: 30 May 2019 / Accepted: 10 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
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Abstract
The discovery of layered materials, including transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), gives rise to a variety of novel nanoelectronic devices, including fast switching field-effect transistors (FET), assembled heterostructures, flexible electronics, etc. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a transition metal dichalcogenides semiconductor, is considered an [...] Read more.
The discovery of layered materials, including transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), gives rise to a variety of novel nanoelectronic devices, including fast switching field-effect transistors (FET), assembled heterostructures, flexible electronics, etc. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a transition metal dichalcogenides semiconductor, is considered an auspicious candidate for the post-silicon era due to its outstanding chemical and thermal stability. We present a Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) study of a MoS2 FET device, showing direct evidence for pinch-off formation in the channel by in situ monitoring of the electrostatic potential distribution along the conducting channel of the transistor. In addition, we present a systematic comparison between a monolayer MoS2 FET and a few-layer MoS2 FET regarding gating effects, electric field distribution, depletion region, and pinch-off formation in such devices. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Probing the Optical Properties of MoS2 on SiO2/Si and Sapphire Substrates
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 740; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050740
Received: 27 March 2019 / Revised: 6 May 2019 / Accepted: 9 May 2019 / Published: 14 May 2019
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Abstract
As an important supplementary material to graphene in the optoelectronics field, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted attention from researchers due to its good light absorption capacity and adjustable bandgap. In this paper, MoS2 layers are respectively grown on SiO2 [...] Read more.
As an important supplementary material to graphene in the optoelectronics field, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted attention from researchers due to its good light absorption capacity and adjustable bandgap. In this paper, MoS2 layers are respectively grown on SiO2/Si and sapphire substrates by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). Atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, and Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy are used to probe the optical properties of MoS2 on SiO2/Si and sapphire substrates systematically. The peak shift between the characteristic A1g and E12g peaks increases, and the I peak of the PL spectrum on the SiO2/Si substrate redshifts slightly when the layer numbers were increased, which can help in obtaining the layer number and peak position of MoS2. Moreover, the difference from monolayer MoS2 on the SiO2/Si substrate is that the B peak of the PL spectrum has a blueshift of 56 meV and the characteristic E12g peak of the Raman spectrum has no blueshift. The 1- and 2-layer MoS2 on a sapphire substrate had a higher PL peak intensity than that of the SiO2/Si substrate. When the laser wavelength is transformed from 532 to 633 nm, the position of I exciton peak has a blueshift of 16 meV, and the PL intensity of monolayer MoS2 on the SiO2/Si substrate increases. The optical properties of MoS2 can be obtained, which is helpful for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices. Full article
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Figure 1

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