Special Issue "Metal Organic Frameworks in Energy Storage"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rahul R. Salunkhe
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Jammu, Jammu-181121, J&K, India
Interests: material science; nanoporous materials; electrochemical energy storage; ultracapacitor etc.
Prof. Dr. Yusuke Yamauchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Professor / School of Chem Eng
Senior Group Leader/ Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) The University of Queensland, Australia
Interests: Inorganic Chemistry; Materials Chemistry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jeonghun Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering and Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN), The University of Queensland, Australia
Interests: synthesis of organic and inorganic materials; nanoarchitecture; covalent organic framework; nanoporous materials; catalyst; energy storage; bio-applications
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted considerable attention for various applications because of their high adsorption capacities relative to other porous materials. By use of different organic and inorganic constituents, MOFs can be prepared in a variety of sizes, shapes and with different porosities and surface functionalities. Thus, MOFs and their derivatives have potential applications in clean energy storage, such as batteries, catalysis, supercapacitors, etc. This Special Issue explores scientific advances of MOFs in energy storage applications and includes research articles focusing on experimental studies, as well prospective discussing practical applications.

Prof. Dr. Rahul R. Salunkhe
Prof. Dr. Yusuke Yamauchi
Dr. Jeonghun Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metal-organic framework
  • energy storage
  • nanoporous carbons
  • metal oxides

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Nanoporous Iron Oxide/Carbon Composites through In-Situ Deposition of Prussian Blue Nanoparticles on Graphene Oxide Nanosheets and Subsequent Thermal Treatment for Supercapacitor Applications
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050776 - 21 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This work reports the successful preparation of nanoporous iron oxide/carbon composites through the in-situ growth of Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. The applied thermal treatment allows the conversion of PB nanoparticles into iron oxide (Fe2 [...] Read more.
This work reports the successful preparation of nanoporous iron oxide/carbon composites through the in-situ growth of Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. The applied thermal treatment allows the conversion of PB nanoparticles into iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles. The resulting iron oxide/carbon composite exhibits higher specific capacitance at all scan rates than pure GO and Fe2O3 electrodes due to the synergistic contribution of electric double-layer capacitance from GO and pseudocapacitance from Fe2O3. Notably, even at a high current density of 20 A g−1, the iron oxide/carbon composite still shows a high capacitance retention of 51%, indicating that the hybrid structure provides a highly accessible path for diffusion of electrolyte ions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Organic Frameworks in Energy Storage)
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Open AccessArticle
Predicting the Features of Methane Adsorption in Large Pore Metal-Organic Frameworks for Energy Storage
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(10), 818; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8100818 - 11 Oct 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Currently, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are receiving significant attention as part of an international push to use their special properties in an extensive variety of energy applications. In particular, MOFs have exceptional potential for gas storage especially for methane and hydrogen for automobiles. However, [...] Read more.
Currently, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are receiving significant attention as part of an international push to use their special properties in an extensive variety of energy applications. In particular, MOFs have exceptional potential for gas storage especially for methane and hydrogen for automobiles. However, using theoretical approaches to investigate this important problem presents various difficulties. Here we present the outcomes of a basic theoretical investigation into methane adsorption in large pore MOFs with the aim of capturing the unique features of this phenomenon. We have developed a pseudo one-dimensional statistical mechanical theory of adsorption of gas in a MOF with both narrow and large pores, which is solved exactly using a transfer matrix technique in the Osmotic Ensemble (OE). The theory effectively describes the distinctive features of adsorption of gas isotherms in MOFs. The characteristic forms of adsorption isotherms in MOFs reflect changes in structure caused by adsorption of gas and compressive stress. Of extraordinary importance for gas storage for energy applications, we find two regimes of Negative gas adsorption (NGA) where gas pressure causes the MOF to transform from the large pore to the narrow pore structure. These transformations can be induced by mechanical compression and conceivably used in an engine to discharge adsorbed gas from the MOF. The elements which govern NGA in MOFs with large pores are identified. Our study may help guide the difficult program of work for computer simulation studies of gas storage in MOFs with large pores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Organic Frameworks in Energy Storage)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Predicting the Features of Small Molecule Gas Adsorption in Large-Pore Metal-Organic Frameworks for Energy Storage
Author: George Manos 1, Lawrence J. Dunne 2,3,*
Affiliation:
1 Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE, UK;
2 School of Engineering, London South Bank University, London SE1 0AA, UK;
3 Department of Chemistry, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ, UK
Abstract: Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have become the focus of a World-wide effort to exploit their unique properties in a wide range of energy applications. Because of their high absorbency they have very significant potential for gas separation and storage particularly methane and hydrogen for vehicles. Here we present the results of a fundamental theoretical study of small molecule adsorption in a generic large-pore MOF with the purpose of identifying features important in gas storage. In this approach we consider a quasi-one dimensional statistical mechanical model of gas adsorption in a metal-organic framework (MOF) with both narrow and large pores which is solved exactly by a transfer matrix method in the Osmotic Ensemble. The model successfully describes the shape of gas adsorption isotherms in MOFs which reflect structural transitions induced by adsorption. Of great significance for gas storage we find two regions of negative gas adsorption where gas pressure causes collapse of the structure. These transitions can be driven by applied mechanical pressure and possibly utilised in an engine to release adsorbed gas from the MOF. The factors which govern this negative gas adsorption are identified.

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