Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Immunosensors and DNA Sensors"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Reynaldo Villalonga Santana Website E-Mail
Nanosensors & Nanomachines Group, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Ave. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: electrochemical biosensors; nanomaterials engineering; nanomachines
Guest Editor
Dr. Alfredo Sanchez Sanchez Website E-Mail
Complutense University. Chemistry Faculty. Plaza de las Ciencias s/n 28040 Madrid (SPAIN)
Interests: Nanomachines, molecular gates, drug delivery, nanosensors, electrochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors are self-contained and integrated receptor–transducer analytical devices, in which a biological recognition element is in intimate contact or incorporated with a suitable transducer. During last few decades, biosensor technology has been empowered by the unique high surface area to volume ratio, biomolecule load capacity, easy preparation and functionalization, and optical, thermo-, electroconductive and catalytic properties of nanomaterials. In special, nanosized materials have significantly impacted in bioanalytical chemistry allowing the preparation of a great variety of biosensor devices with original three-dimensional architectures and excellent bioanalytical properties. Nanomaterials, used along or rationally combined as tailor-made hybrid or composite nanomaterials, have been largely employed as transduction, amplification and labelling elements to construct reliable and sensitive sensor devices for clinical, environmental, industrial and food analysis. In this context, special attention has been devoted to design original nanomaterials-based immunosensors and DNA biosensors, due to the relevance of these affinity sensor devices in biomedical applications.

This Special Issue aims to focus on the last advances in the development of innovative nanomaterials-based optical, electrochemical, thermal and piezoelectric immunosensors and DNA sensors. Special attention will be paid to new strategies for nanomaterials preparation and functionalization, oriented immobilization of DNA and antibody molecules, aptasensors, and design of label-free biosensing approaches in order to realize highly sensitive, selective and stable biosensors devices.

Prof. Reynaldo Villalonga Santana
Dr. Alfredo Sánchez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensor
  • nanomaterial
  • antibody
  • DNA
  • immunosensor
  • aptamer
  • immobilization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
A Colorimetric Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay with CuO Nanoparticles as Signal Labels Based on the Growth of Gold Nanoparticles In Situ
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010004 - 20 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
A colorimetric immunoassay has been reported for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) detection with CuO nanoparticles (CuO NPs) as signal labels. The method is based on Cu2+-catalyzed oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by O2 to depress the formation of colored gold nanoparticles [...] Read more.
A colorimetric immunoassay has been reported for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) detection with CuO nanoparticles (CuO NPs) as signal labels. The method is based on Cu2+-catalyzed oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by O2 to depress the formation of colored gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Specifically, HAuCl4 can be reduced by AA to produce AuNPs in situ. In the presence of target, CuO NPs-labeled antibodies were captured via the sandwich-type immunoreaction. After dissolving CuO nanoparticles with acid, the released Cu2+ catalyzed the oxidation of AA by O2, thus depressing the generation of AuNPs. To demonstrate the accuracy of the colorimetric assay, the released Cu2+ was further determined by a fluorescence probe. The colorimetric immunoassay shows a linear relationship for PSA detection in the range of 0.1~10 ng/mL. The detection limit of 0.05 ng/mL is comparable to that obtained by other CuO NPs-based methods. The high throughput, simplicity, and sensitivity of the proposed colorimetric immunoassay exhibited good applicability for assays of serum samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Immunosensors and DNA Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Gold Nanoparticle-Based Colorimetric Strategies for Chemical and Biological Sensing Applications
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060861 - 06 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Gold nanoparticles are popularly used in biological and chemical sensors and their applications owing to their fascinating chemical, optical, and catalytic properties. Particularly, the use of gold nanoparticles is widespread in colorimetric assays because of their simple, cost-effective fabrication, and ease of use. [...] Read more.
Gold nanoparticles are popularly used in biological and chemical sensors and their applications owing to their fascinating chemical, optical, and catalytic properties. Particularly, the use of gold nanoparticles is widespread in colorimetric assays because of their simple, cost-effective fabrication, and ease of use. More importantly, the gold nanoparticle sensor response is a visual change in color, which allows easy interpretation of results. Therefore, many studies of gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric methods have been reported, and some review articles published over the past years. Most reviews focus exclusively on a single gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric technique for one analyte of interest. In this review, we focus on the current developments in different colorimetric assay designs for the sensing of various chemical and biological samples. We summarize and classify the sensing strategies and mechanism analyses of gold nanoparticle-based detection. Additionally, typical examples of recently developed gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric methods and their applications in the detection of various analytes are presented and discussed comprehensively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Immunosensors and DNA Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Nanomaterials-Based Colorimetric Immunoassays
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030316 - 27 Feb 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Colorimetric immunoassays for tumor marker detection have attracted considerable attention due to their simplicity and high efficiency. With the achievements of nanotechnology and nanoscience, nanomaterials-based colorimetric immunoassays have been demonstrated to be promising alternatives to conventional colorimetric enzyme-linked immunoassays. This review is focused [...] Read more.
Colorimetric immunoassays for tumor marker detection have attracted considerable attention due to their simplicity and high efficiency. With the achievements of nanotechnology and nanoscience, nanomaterials-based colorimetric immunoassays have been demonstrated to be promising alternatives to conventional colorimetric enzyme-linked immunoassays. This review is focused on the progress in colorimetric immunoassays with the signal amplification of nanomaterials, including nanomaterials-based artificial enzymes to catalyze the chromogenic reactions, analyte-induced aggregation or size/morphology change of nanomaterials, nanomaterials as the carriers for loading enzyme labels, and chromogenic reactions induced by the constituent elements released from nanomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Immunosensors and DNA Sensors)
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