Feature Papers in Methods and Protocols 2024

A special issue of Methods and Protocols (ISSN 2409-9279).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1869

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Guest Editor
1. School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
2. Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: antimicrobial peptides; solid-phase chemistry; combinatorial chemistry; drug delivery systems; peptide drug conjugates; orthogonal chemistry; drug discovery; biomaterials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are glad to announce this Special Issue on “Feature Papers in Methods and Protocols”. In this Special Issue, we will collect articles from top researchers describing new approaches or new cutting-edge developments to tackle questions in the fields of life sciences, chemistry, and biomedical sciences. In particular, we encourage submissions in the emerging fields of “Omics and High Throughput”, “Public Health Research”, “Synthetic and Systems Biology” and “Tissue Engineering and Organoids”. Our aim is to encourage scientists to publish new protocols based on established techniques, as well as significant improvements and developments of cutting-edge methods. For all articles, background information necessary to understand the underlying principles, full experimental details, and comparison with the available protocols/methods must be provided. Scientists are encouraged to provide accompanying video demonstrations, which will be published online, for ease of reproducibility.

You are welcome to send short proposals for the submission of feature papers to our Managing Editor Ms. Eunice Fu ([email protected]) or Editorial Office ([email protected]) before submission. All papers will be subjected to thorough and rigorous peer review.

We look forward to receiving your excellent work.

Prof. Dr. Fernando Albericio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Methods and Protocols is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cell biology
  • biochemistry
  • chemistry
  • nanotechnology
  • biotechnology
  • imaging
  • applied computation and bioinformatics
  • genomics
  • proteomics
  • developmental biology
  • model organisms
  • pharmacology
  • structural biology/chemistry
  • biophysics
  • tissue engineering
  • public health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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8 pages, 2411 KiB  
Communication
Optimization of the Amplification of Equine Muscle-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in a Hollow-Fiber Bioreactor
by Julien Duysens, Hélène Graide, Ariane Niesten, Ange Mouithys-Mickalad, Justine Ceusters and Didier Serteyn
Methods Protoc. 2024, 7(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/mps7020032 - 02 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The main causes of mortality in horses are the gastrointestinal pathologies associated with septic shock. Stem cells have shown, through systemic injection, a capacity to decrease inflammation and to regenerate injured tissue faster. Nevertheless, to achieve this rapid and total regeneration, systemic injections [...] Read more.
The main causes of mortality in horses are the gastrointestinal pathologies associated with septic shock. Stem cells have shown, through systemic injection, a capacity to decrease inflammation and to regenerate injured tissue faster. Nevertheless, to achieve this rapid and total regeneration, systemic injections of 1 to 2 million cells per kilogram of body weight must be considered. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the feasibility and expansion capacity of equine muscle-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (mdMSCs) in a functionally closed, automated, perfusion-based, hollow-fiber bioreactor (HFBR) called the Quantum™ Cell Expansion System (Terumo Blood and Cell Technologies). This feature greatly increases the number of generated cells with a surface area of 1.7 m2. The expansion of mdMSCs is very efficient in this bioreactor. The maximum expansion generated twenty times more cells than the initial seeding in nine days. The best returns were observed with an optimal seeding between 10 and 25 million mdMSCs, using the Bull’s eye loading method and with a run duration between 7 and 10 days. Moreover, all the generated cells kept their stem properties: the ability to adhere to plastic and to differentiate into chondroblasts, osteoblasts and adipocytes. They also showed the expression of CD-44 and CD-90 markers, with a positive rate above 93%, while CD-45 and MHCII were non-expressed, with a positive rate below 0.5%. By capitalizing on the scalability, automation and 3D culture capabilities of the Quantum™, it is possible to generate large quantities of high-quality equine mdMSCs for gastrointestinal disorders and other clinical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Methods and Protocols 2024)
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Review

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14 pages, 557 KiB  
Review
Imaging Flow Cytometry: Development, Present Applications, and Future Challenges
by Savvas Dimitriadis, Lefkothea Dova, Ioannis Kotsianidis, Eleftheria Hatzimichael, Eleni Kapsali and Georgios S. Markopoulos
Methods Protoc. 2024, 7(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/mps7020028 - 23 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Imaging flow cytometry (ImFC) represents a significant technological advancement in the field of cytometry, effectively merging the high-throughput capabilities of flow analysis with the detailed imaging characteristics of microscopy. In our comprehensive review, we adopt a historical perspective to chart the development of [...] Read more.
Imaging flow cytometry (ImFC) represents a significant technological advancement in the field of cytometry, effectively merging the high-throughput capabilities of flow analysis with the detailed imaging characteristics of microscopy. In our comprehensive review, we adopt a historical perspective to chart the development of ImFC, highlighting its origins and current state of the art and forecasting potential future advancements. The genesis of ImFC stemmed from merging the hydraulic system of a flow cytometer with advanced camera technology. This synergistic coupling facilitates the morphological analysis of cell populations at a high-throughput scale, effectively evolving the landscape of cytometry. Nevertheless, ImFC’s implementation has encountered hurdles, particularly in developing software capable of managing its sophisticated data acquisition and analysis needs. The scale and complexity of the data generated by ImFC necessitate the creation of novel analytical tools that can effectively manage and interpret these data, thus allowing us to unlock the full potential of ImFC. Notably, artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms have begun to be applied to ImFC, offering promise for enhancing its analytical capabilities. The adaptability and learning capacity of AI may prove to be essential in knowledge mining from the high-dimensional data produced by ImFC, potentially enabling more accurate analyses. Looking forward, we project that ImFC may become an indispensable tool, not only in research laboratories, but also in clinical settings. Given the unique combination of high-throughput cytometry and detailed imaging offered by ImFC, we foresee a critical role for this technology in the next generation of scientific research and diagnostics. As such, we encourage both current and future scientists to consider the integration of ImFC as an addition to their research toolkit and clinical diagnostic routine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Methods and Protocols 2024)
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