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Special Issue "Starch in Food Products"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Hyun-Jung Chung

Division of Food and Nutrition, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: starch chemistry; structure–function relationship of starch; development of functional starch-based foods; novel utilization of carbohydrate in food products; food applications of modified starches; development of gluten-free food products

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Amongst the biopolymers in nature, starch has received the most attention with respect to its nutritive value and structure–function relations in food and non-food industrial products and applications. Starch and products derived from starch are the major components in food products and could be used to affect the physical properties of many foods. Starch from different sources and genotypes within sources showed substantial diversity in their composition, structure of amylose and amylopectin, and structural arrangement of starch granules, which contribute to different physicochemical properties and thus different functionalities. Understanding the relationship between starch structure and functionalities in food systems is important. Research on the effect of chemical, enzymatic, and physical modifications of native starches has further improved its properties and expanded the spectrum of starch applications in food systems. In addition, various physical processing techniques such as heat, shear, and moisture content highly influence the structure of starch molecules and interactions with other bio-molecules and food additives as well as the sensory and nutritional qualities of final food products. The impact of these interactions on the sensory and nutritional qualities of foods and their safety has been the focus for a number of current research studies. The current research is also geared towards the importance of starch in human nutrition and health. A new challenge for the food industry is to supply consumers with starch-containing foods with improved nutritional quality. The different forms of existence of starch in foods and novel food processing with respect to its digestibility have received tremendous research focus. This Special Issue of Molecules aims to acquire in-depth knowledge about some of the aforementioned research concepts in starch-derived application in food products.

Assoc. Prof. Hyun-Jung Chung
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Starch functionality
  • Starch structure
  • Food application of starch
  • Novel starch development
  • Modified starch
  • Grain-based products
  • Novel food processing in starch-based foods
  • Starch and health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Structural Characteristics and In Vitro Digestibility of Malic Acid-Treated Corn Starch with Different pH Conditions
Molecules 2019, 24(10), 1900; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24101900
Received: 26 April 2019 / Revised: 13 May 2019 / Accepted: 16 May 2019 / Published: 17 May 2019
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of pH value on the in vitro digestibility of malic acid-treated corn starch in relation to its structural properties. Varying pH values (1.5–8.5) of 2 M malic acid solution were combined with corn [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of pH value on the in vitro digestibility of malic acid-treated corn starch in relation to its structural properties. Varying pH values (1.5–8.5) of 2 M malic acid solution were combined with corn starch in a forced-air oven at 130 °C for 12 h. Using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), carbonyl groups were detected in malic acid-treated corn starch, indicating cross-linking through esterification. As the pH value of malic acid-treated corn starch decreased from 8.5 to 1.5, the resistant starch content increased from 18.2 to 74.8%. This was the result of an increased degree of substitution and was maintained after gelatinization. The granular structure of malic acid-treated corn starches was not destroyed, and the starches maintained birefringence. This malic acid-treated corn starch could be utilized in heat processed foods such as bread and cookies as well as in products with reduced calories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Starch in Food Products)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Microencapsulation of Elsholtzia ciliata Herb Ethanolic Extract by Spray-Drying: Impact of Resistant-Maltodextrin Complemented with Sodium Caseinate, Skim Milk, and Beta-Cyclodextrin on the Quality of Spray-Dried Powders
Molecules 2019, 24(8), 1461; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24081461
Received: 24 March 2019 / Revised: 11 April 2019 / Accepted: 12 April 2019 / Published: 13 April 2019
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Abstract
Spray-drying is the most popular encapsulation method used for the stabilization and protection of biologically active compounds from various environmental conditions, such as oxidation, moisture, pH, and temperature. Spray-drying increases the bioavailability of the natural active compounds and improves the solubility of low-soluble [...] Read more.
Spray-drying is the most popular encapsulation method used for the stabilization and protection of biologically active compounds from various environmental conditions, such as oxidation, moisture, pH, and temperature. Spray-drying increases the bioavailability of the natural active compounds and improves the solubility of low-soluble compounds. The aim of this work was to study the effects of different wall materials and optimize wall material solution’s composition on physicochemical properties of microcapsules loaded with phenolics, extract rich in volatile compounds and essential oil from Elsholtzia ciliata herb. For encapsulation of elsholtzia and dehydroelsholtzia ketones, more suitable wall materials were used—beta-cyclodextrin and sodium caseinate. Four phenolics—sodium caseinate, skim milk, beta-cyclodextrin, and resistant-maltodextrin—were used. A D-optimal mixture composition design was used to evaluate the effect of wall material solution’s composition using sodium caseinate (0.5–1 g), skim milk (6–10 g), resistant-maltodextrin (8–12 g), and beta-cyclodextrin (0.5–1 g) for the encapsulation efficiency, drying yield, and physicochemical properties. The optimal mixture composition was 0.54 g of sodium caseinate, 10 g of skim milk, 8.96 g of resistant-maltodextrin, and 0.5 g of beta-cyclodextrin. These encapsulating agents had a good performance in the microencapsulation of E. ciliata ethanolic extracts by the spray-drying technique. It is proven that the produced microparticles have a good potential to be included in various pharmaceutical forms or food supplements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Starch in Food Products)
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Maltodextrins on the Kinetics of Lycopene and Chlorogenic Acid Degradation in Dried Tomato
Molecules 2019, 24(6), 1042; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24061042
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 11 March 2019 / Accepted: 13 March 2019 / Published: 16 March 2019
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Abstract
Maltodextrins (MD) are frequently used as processing aids in tomato drying. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of MD on the stability of lycopene and chlorogenic acid, which are the main lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants in [...] Read more.
Maltodextrins (MD) are frequently used as processing aids in tomato drying. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of MD on the stability of lycopene and chlorogenic acid, which are the main lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants in processed tomato, respectively. Tomato powder added with 10% MD (dextrose equivalents, DE 12) and a control tomato powder were stored in the water activity (aw) range 0.17–0.56, for 180 d at 30 °C. At the aw level of 0.17, which was below the monolayer moisture content (Mo), chlorogenic acid was stable, while lycopene content decreased faster in tomato added with MD than in control tomato, probably due to a decrease in matrix hydrophilicity and greater oxygen diffusion in the oil phase. Maximum stability occurred in both tomato powders at aw of 0.3, that was in close proximity to Mo (first-order rate constant for lycopene, k = 7.0 × 10−3 d−1 in tomato added with MD). At high aw levels, MD increased the rate of lycopene degradation with respect to the control, possibly by hampering its regeneration by chlorogenic acid, which conversely was found to be more stable than in the control tomato. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Starch in Food Products)
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