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Special Issue "Solid-Phase Microextraction II"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Analytical Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Assist. Prof. Constantinos K. Zacharis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, School of Pharmacy, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: pharmaceutical analytical chemistry; method development and validation; sample preparation (derivatization, microextraction, etc.); liquid and gas chromatography; capillary electrophoresis; mass spectrometry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assist. Prof. Paraskevas D. Tzanavaras
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Tel. +30 2310997721
Interests: automation; sequential injection analysis; separation techniques (HPLC, CE); post-column derivatization; microextraction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the great success of the first Special Issue of the international journal Molecules dedicated to solid phase microextraction (SPME), which hosted 15 high-quality articles from colleagues all around the world (URL https://www.mdpi.com/journal/molecules/special_issues/Solid_phase_microextraction), in cooperation with the editors of the journal, we have decided to edit a second Special Issue on the same topic.
Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is a mature and advantageous sample preparation technique with numerous applications in various scientific fields. Due to its versatility, reliability, low cost, and sampling convenience (on-site sampling), SPME has been widely used in combination with separation techniques (LC, GC, CE) in academic research and routine analysis as well. As a result of its impact, it has been introduced in several official methods. On-going research and new trends on SPME cover various aspects, including—but not limited to—the manufacturing of new fiber coating materials, new designs (in-needle, in-tube, in-tube, etc.), incorporation of SPME in automated systems, etc.
This second Special Issue on SPME still aims to cover the latest research trends and applications in this research field. Researchers working on—but not limited to—fiber coating technology, online automated SPME, and their applications in food, environmental, and biomedical sciences are cordially invited to contribute a research or review article.

Dr. Constantinos K. Zacharis
Assist. Prof. Paraskevas D. Tzanavaras
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Solid phase microextraction
  • Headspace solid phase microextraction
  • On-fiber derivatization
  • On-site sampling
  • In-needle SPME
  • In-tube SPME
  • Multiple extraction
  • Automation
  • SPME coupling to various analytical systems—instrumentation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Determination of Volatile Compounds in Nut-Based Milk Alternative Beverages by HS-SPME Prior to GC-MS Analysis
Molecules 2019, 24(17), 3091; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24173091 - 26 Aug 2019
Abstract
A reliable Headspace-Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) method was developed for the determination of polar volatile components of commercial nut-based milk alternative drinks prior to Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Under the optimum extraction conditions, a divinylbenzene (DVB)/Carboxen™ CAR)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber was used and [...] Read more.
A reliable Headspace-Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) method was developed for the determination of polar volatile components of commercial nut-based milk alternative drinks prior to Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Under the optimum extraction conditions, a divinylbenzene (DVB)/Carboxen™ CAR)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber was used and 2 mL of sample was heated at 60 °C for 40 min under stirring, without salt addition. Ten compounds from different chemical classes (heptane, a-pinene, toluene, 2-methylpyrazine, 3-heptanone, heptanal, 2-octanone, 1-heptanol, benzaldehyde and 1-octanol) were chosen as model analytes for quantification. Limits of detection and limits of quantification were found to be 0.33–1.67 ng g−1 and 1–5 ng g−1, accordingly. Good linearity, precision and accuracy were obtained as well as a wide linear range. The proposed method was successfully applied to various beverages including almond milk, walnut milk, peanut milk and almond chocolate milk. More than 70 volatile compounds were detected in the different samples. Most of the detected volatiles were aldehydes, ketones and alcohols. This technique can be used for the determination of volatile compounds in nut-based beverages, to detect compositional changes during storage and technological treatment used for their production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid-Phase Microextraction II)
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Open AccessArticle
Determination of Various Drying Methods’ Impact on Odour Quality of True Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.) Flowers
Molecules 2019, 24(16), 2900; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24162900 - 09 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
True lavender flowers (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.) is a critical source of essential oils and a flavouring agent used in numerous industries like foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Its main volatile constituents are linalool and linalyl acetate, which are commonly considered as main odour-active [...] Read more.
True lavender flowers (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.) is a critical source of essential oils and a flavouring agent used in numerous industries like foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Its main volatile constituents are linalool and linalyl acetate, which are commonly considered as main odour-active constituents (OACs). Nevertheless, the quality of true lavender flowers is highly dependent on its post-harvest treatment, mainly the preservation method. Recognising that drying is the most frequently used preservation method, the influence of various drying methods, including convective drying (CD) at 50, 60 and 70 °C, vacuum-microwave drying (VMD) with powers 240, 360 and 480 W and combined convective pre-drying at 60 °C followed by vacuum-microwave finish-drying with power 480 W (CPD-VMFD), on the quality of true lavender flowers was verified. The evaluation of influence was carried out by HS-SPME(HS, solid-phase microextraction), GC-MS, GC-MS-O (gas chromatography–mass spectrometry–olfactometry) techniques. Moreover, the sensory panel has assessed the sample odour quality. As a result, the optimal drying methods regarding the requirements for products were established. Overall, for total essential oil recovery, CD at 50 °C is the optimal drying method, while for odour quality concerning the sensory panel evaluation, VMD with power 360 W combined CPD-VMFD and CD at 50 °C is the optimal drying method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid-Phase Microextraction II)
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