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Special Issue "Alliums: Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry and Biological Activities"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Masayoshi Shigyo
Website
Guest Editor
Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi, Japan
Interests: plant genetics; plant breeding; functional food; plant genomics; horticultural crop, alliums; the genetics and breeding of vegetable crops; novel onion
Dr. Mostafa Abdelrahman
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Molecular Breeding, Arid Land Research Center, Tottori University, Japan
Interests: transcripotme and metabolome dynamics in crop responses to environmental stress; natural products; saponins; flavonoids; plant-microbe interactions; metabolic pathway

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants produce a diverse array of primary and secondary metabolites to protect themselves and to communicate with the components of their ecosystem. In the field of omic technology, metabolomics—the large-scale study of metabolites—represents a powerful approach, which directly reflect the underlying global biochemical activity, physiological conditions, and metabolic state of biological systems. Therefore, metabolites are closely correlated to phenotype and can bridge the gap between the phenotype and genoptype of biological systems.

Allium is an enormous genus that compromises several economically important crops, including the bulb onion (Allium cepa), shallot (the A. cepa Aggregatum group), Japanese bunching onion (A. fistulosum), garlic (A. sativum), chive (A. schoenoprasum), Chinese chive (A. tuberosum), and leek (A. ampeloprasum). Onions and garlic are some of the earliest domesticated horticultural crops and have been widely cultivated and prized for their medicinal, nutritional, and culinary properties. Allium is a rich source of diverse metabolites, such as amino acids, phenolics, fructooligosaccharides, and organosulfure compounds. The Allium metabolites not only affect economically important traits such as color, flavor, and pungency, but also play an important role in plant physiology and in promoting human health. Thus, Allium metabolomics may reveal the agricultural potential of Allium.

This Special Issue will highlight research articles and critical reviews analyzing the role of metabolomics in the Allium crops. It will consider the many translations and applications of metabolomics, including sample handling and analytical development challenges, data analysis, metabolic modeling, and network analysis. Large-scale association studies and integrative omics and the inherent bioinformatics and computing challenges will also be considered. Articles focusing on the current potential of Allium metabolomics for Allium breeding, including comparative genotyping, natural products, medicinal properties, and plant–environment interactions, are highly desired. If you are interested in submitting an article to this Special Issue, you may direct any questions you have to the Guest Editor.

Dr. Masayoshi Shigyo
Dr. Mostafa Abdelrahman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Allium metabolomics
  • natural products
  • isolation and quantification of saponin, organosulfure compounds, and phenolics in Allium crops
  • metabolic changes of Allium crops in response to biotic and abiotic stress
  • selection and genetic manipulation
  • integrated metabolome–transcriptome of Allium crops
  • LC/MS and GC/MS applications for Allium metabolites

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Synergistic Antitumor Effect of 5-Fluorouracil Combined with Allicin against Lung and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells
Molecules 2020, 25(8), 1947; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081947 - 22 Apr 2020
Abstract
5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is an anticancer drug used to inhibit the proliferation of many different tumor cells. Since severe events are associated with this compound, its combination with different anticancer drugs or adjuvants would allow the use of a significantly lower dose of 5-FU. [...] Read more.
5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is an anticancer drug used to inhibit the proliferation of many different tumor cells. Since severe events are associated with this compound, its combination with different anticancer drugs or adjuvants would allow the use of a significantly lower dose of 5-FU. In this study, we highlighted that the combination of allicin with 5-FU inhibited the cell migration and proliferation of colorectal and lung cancer cells. 5-FU inhibited cell growth with a similar inhibitory concentration for both normal and tumor cells (~200µM), while allicin showed different inhibitory concentrations. With an IC50 of 8.625 µM, lung cancer cells were the most sensitive to allicin. Compared to 5-FU and allicin single-agent treatments, the co-treatment showed a reduced viability rate, with p < 0.05. The morphological changes were visible on all three cell lines, indicating that the treatment inhibited the proliferation of both normal and tumor cells. We highlighted different cell death mechanisms—apoptosis for lung cancer and a non-apoptotic cell death for colorectal cancer. The synergistic antitumor effect of 5-FU combined with allicin was visible against lung and colorectal carcinoma cells. Better results were obtained when a lower concentration of 5-FU was combined with allicin than the single-agent treatment at IC50. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alliums: Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry and Biological Activities)
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Open AccessArticle
Allium sativum Extract Chemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity and Antifungal Effect against Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa Causing Onychomycosis
Molecules 2019, 24(21), 3958; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24213958 - 31 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Onychomycosis is a major health problem due to its chronicity and resistance to therapy. Because some cases associate paronychia, any therapy must target the fungus and the inflammation. Medicinal plants represent an alternative for onychomycosis control. In the present work the antifungal and [...] Read more.
Onychomycosis is a major health problem due to its chronicity and resistance to therapy. Because some cases associate paronychia, any therapy must target the fungus and the inflammation. Medicinal plants represent an alternative for onychomycosis control. In the present work the antifungal and antioxidant activities of Alium sativum extract against Meyerozyma guilliermondii (Wick.) Kurtzman & M. Suzuki and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (A. Jörg.) F.C. Harrison, isolated for the first time from a toenail onychomycosis case, were investigated. The fungal species were confirmed by DNA molecular analysis. A. sativum minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and ultrastructural effects were examined. At the MIC concentration (120 mg/mL) the micrographs indicated severe structural alterations with cell death. The antioxidant properties of the A. sativum extract were evaluated is a rat turpentine oil induced inflammation, and compared to an anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac, and the main compound from the extract, allicin. A. sativum reduced serum total oxidative status, malondialdehyde and nitric oxide production, and increased total thiols. The effects were comparable to those of allicin and diclofenac. In conclusion, the garlic extract had antifungal effects against M. guilliermondii and R. mucilaginosa, and antioxidant effect in turpentine-induced inflammation. Together, the antifungal and antioxidant activities support that A. sativum is a potential alternative treatment in onychomycosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alliums: Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry and Biological Activities)
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