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Special Issue "Environmental Applications of Catalytic Ozonation"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Fernando J. Beltrán Novillo

Instituto Universitario de Investigación del Agua, Cambio Climático y Sostenibilidad Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Water Ozonation; Advanced Oxidation Processes; Catalysis Engineering; Environmental Remediation; Photocatalysis
Guest Editor
Dr. Pedro M. Álvarez

Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Ingeniería Química y Química Física, Badajoz, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Advanced Oxidation Processes; Catalysis Engineering; Environmental Remediation; Photocatalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ozone, an allotropic form of oxygen, is known to react with organics in water through two reaction mechanisms: selective direct reaction with some organics having specific moieties, and unselective reaction through free radical oxygen species (ROS), mainly hydroxyl radicals, coming from ozone decomposition. In spite of the high reactivity of ozone, its application in water treatment did not take off until the end of the 1970s, when ozone was confirmed as an alternative oxidant to chlorine to reduce the formation of organohalogen compounds during drinking water disinfection. A decade later, research on the combination of ozone and UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide showed ways to increase hydroxyl radical concentrations, giving rise to the appearance of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Later, different AOPs have been extensively investigated (Fenton, photocatalytic oxidation, etc.) Among them, catalytic ozonation has attracted interest for water treatment in spite of the costs associated with the generation and dissolution of ozone in water. In fact, in the period 1990–2018, more than 650 works have been published on this subject. At the turn of the century, another ozone-based AOP called the interest of the scientific community: photocatalytic ozonation, or the combination of catalysts, radiation, and ozone. In the period 2005–2018, the literature has reported more than 100 publications on this emerging AOP. In addition to water treatment applications, catalytic ozonation is receiving attention as a method to control volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions.

This Special Issue is dedicated to catalytic ozonation processes with the aim to collect findings on aspects related to the synthesis and characterization of catalysts, the removal of organics, the mechanism and kinetics of the processes, the combination of catalytic ozonation with other elements and operations, such as membranes, carbon adsorption, and biological oxidation, the application in the treatment of wastewater, and the control of gaseous emissions.

Prof. Fernando J. Beltrán Novillo
Dr. Pedro M. Álvarez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ozonation
  • Catalytic ozonation
  • Photocatalytic ozonation
  • Advanced oxidation processes
  • Water and wastewater treatment
  • Air purification
  • Heterogeneous catalysis
  • Reaction kinetics
  • Reaction mechanism

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Ozone-Based Advanced Oxidation Processes for Primidone Removal in Water using Simulated Solar Radiation and TiO2 or WO3 as Photocatalyst
Molecules 2019, 24(9), 1728; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24091728
Received: 27 March 2019 / Revised: 29 April 2019 / Accepted: 2 May 2019 / Published: 3 May 2019
PDF Full-text (1929 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this work, primidone, a high persistent pharmacological drug typically found in urban wastewaters, was degraded by different ozone combined AOPs using TiO2 P25 and commercial WO3 as photocatalyst. The comparison of processes, kinetics, nature of transformation products, and ecotoxicity of [...] Read more.
In this work, primidone, a high persistent pharmacological drug typically found in urban wastewaters, was degraded by different ozone combined AOPs using TiO2 P25 and commercial WO3 as photocatalyst. The comparison of processes, kinetics, nature of transformation products, and ecotoxicity of treated water samples, as well as the influence of the water matrix (ultrapure water or a secondary effluent), is presented and discussed. In presence of ozone, primidone is rapidly eliminated, with hydroxyl radicals being the main species involved. TiO2 was the most active catalyst regardless of the water matrix and the type of solar (global or visible) radiation applied. The synergy between ozone and photocatalysis (photocatalytic ozonation) for TOC removal was more evident at low O3 doses. In spite of having a lower band gap than TiO2 P25, WO3 did not bring any beneficial effects compared to TiO2 P25 regarding PRM and TOC removal. Based on the transformation products identified during ozonation and photocatalytic ozonation of primidone (hydroxyprimidone, phenyl-ethyl-malonamide, and 5-ethyldihydropirimidine-4,6(1H,5H)-dione), a degradation pathway is proposed. The application of the different processes resulted in an environmentally safe effluent for Daphnia magna. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Applications of Catalytic Ozonation)
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Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Ozone based Advanced Oxidation Processes for primidone removal in water using simulated solar radiation and TiO2 or WO3 as photocatalyst

Authors: Manuel Figueredo, Eva M. Rodríguez, Manuel Checa and Fernando J. Beltrán*

Affiliation: Departamento de Ingeniería Química y Química Física. Instituto Universitario de Investigación del Agua, Cambio Climático y Sostenibilidad (IACYS). Universidad de Extremadura. 06006 Badajoz (Spain).

Abstract: In this work, primidone, a high persistent pharmacological drug typically found in urban wastewaters, was degraded by different ozone combined AOPs using TiO2 P25 and commercial WO3 as photocatalysts. The comparison of processes, kinetics, nature of transformation products, ecotoxicity of treated water samples as well as the influence of the water matrix (ultrapure water or secondary effluent) is presented and discussed. In presence of ozone primidone is rapidly eliminated, being hydroxyl radicals the main species involved. TiO2 was the most active catalyst regardless of the water matrix and the type of solar (global or visible) radiation applied. The synergy between ozone and photocatalysis (photocatalytic ozonation) for TOC removal was more evident at low O3 doses. The effectiveness of WO3 photocatalytic ozonation in mineralization under global or visible solar radiation in ultrapure water was similar and clearly higher than in the secondary effluent, where the low concentration of dissolved ozone led to a high e- - h+ recombination. Based on the transformation products identified during ozonation and photocatalytic ozonation of primidone (hydroxyprimidone, phenyl-ethyl-malonamide, and 5-ethyldihydropirimidine-4,6(1H,5H)-dione) a degradation pathway is proposed. The application of the different processes resulted in an environmentally safe effluent for Daphnia Magna.

Title: Advances in Treatment of Brominated Hydrocarbons by Catalytic Ozonation and Bromate Minimisation

Author: Sreekantha Jonnalagadda

Affiliation:Univ KwaZulu Natal, Sch Chem & Phys, Westville Campus,Chiltern Hills, ZA-4000 Durban, South Africa

Abstract: A major limitation in the use of ozone for the degradation of brominated organic pollutants during water treatment is the formation of carcinogenic bromate ions. Ozone, being a strong oxidant, oxidizes the bromide ion in water to bromate ion through a combination of reactions of ozone and hydroxyl radical. Various strategies are used to control bromate formation, such as lowering the ozone concentration, or the pH value to less than six, or dosing with ammonia or hydrogen peroxide. However, most of these methods has a negative effect on the ozonation efficiency. Catalytic ozonation has proven to be an effective technology for the removal of organics from wastewater, but few studies were conducted to explore ways to minimize bromate formation by this advanced oxidation process. The proposed article, therefore, presents a comprehensive review on recent advances in bromate reduction in water by catalytic ozonation and propose reaction mechanisms associated with the catalytic processes. The main aim is to highlight any gaps in the reported studies, thus creating a platform for future research and a quest to find environment friendly and efficacious catalysts for effective minimization of bromate formation in water during degradation of brominated compounds.

 

Title: Reuse of spent textile dyeing effluents by catalytic ozonation using metal organic frameworks (MOFs) catalyst

Author: Enling Hu 1,2 and Songmin Shang*, 2

Affiliation: 1 State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, College of Textile and Garment, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China; 2 Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Abstract: Textile dyeing process consumes substantial freshwater, of which as high as 90% is used for washing to remove residuals presented in the fabric substrate in industrial production. In turn, the process generates massive corresponding waste effluents that bring adverse impacts to the environment. This study presents a recycling approach for the spent wastewater generated in the dyeing process for reduction of freshwater consumption. Catalytic ozonation process has been applied to degrade residual chemicals in the spent effluents before their recycling. Accordingly, magnetic ferrous ferric oxide (Fe3O4) occupied metal organic frameworks (MOFs) was prepared to promoted degradation of dyes contaminants in effluents by ozonation treatments. It was validated that [email protected] had strikingly promoted catalytic degradation of pollutants, in terms of removal of color and chemical oxidation demand. Moreover, it also has suggested that waste effluents can be recycled in washing in the aid of catalytic ozonation with MOFs catalyst. After ozonation treatment, they could be repeatedly used to substitute freshwater, and meanwhile sustain the equivalent quality of the corresponding fabrics in terms of color difference and colorfastness. This study firstly demonstrates the feasibility of metal organic frameworks by catalytic ozonation for the sake of recycling waste textile dyeing effluents. It may bring new sight in water management in textile dyeing process.

 

Title: Chemical kinetic modelling of pharmaceutical abatement by an electro-peroxone process

Author: Huijiao Wang 1,2, Lu Su 3, Yi Cheng 1,Gang Yu 2, Xiaoyuan Zhang1, Jun Wang4, Haiou Huang5, Yujue Wang 2,*

Affiliation: 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Reaction Engineering and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; 2 School of Environment, Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; 3 Hangzhou Jinhong Real Estate Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310000, China; 4 State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing, 100085, China; 5 School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875, China

Abstract: The electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) process is an emerging electrocatalytic ozonation process that is enabled by in situ production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from cathodic oxygen reduction during ozonation. The in situ generated H2O2 can then promote ozone (O3) transformation to hydroxyl radicals (•OH), and thus enhance the abatement of ozone-refractory pollutants compared to conventional ozonaiton. In this study, chemical kinetic models were developed to model pharmaceutical abatement by the E-peroxone process. Several pharmaceuticals with varying ozone reactivities (ozone rate constants ranging from

Keywords: Electrocatalytic ozonation; Electro-peroxone; Model; Ozone; Pharmaceutical; Water treatment

Title: Oxidative Efficiency of Ozonation Coupled with Electrolysis for Treatment of Acidic wastewater

Author: Yalei Ding, Huijie Bao, Shaoping Tong*

Affiliation: College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry-Synthesis Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014,China

Abstract: Establishment of an ozone-based advanced oxidation process (AOPs-O3) for practically effective treatment of acidic wastewater is an important and difficult task. The process of ozonation coupled with electrolysis (electrolysis-ozonation, E-O3) has been reported to effectively degrade pollutants in neutral solution. We studied the efficiency of E-O3 for degradation of acetic acid (HAc, an ozone inert chemical) in acidic solution. It was found that E-O3 had high oxidative efficiency at pH less than 3.0. For example, 52.2% of 100 mg•L-1 HAc could be removed by E-O3 under the suitable conditions in 120 min at pH 1.0, but only 2.2% and 3.5% by electrolysis and ozonation, respectively. Although it decreased with the increase of acidity of solution, the efficiency of E-O3 still remained relatively high even at pH 0. The results indicate that electrons can also effectively transfer from cathode to dissolved ozone or oxygen in acidic solution, thus resulting in generation of reactive species, e.g. hydroxyl radical. An actual acidic wastewater was effectively pretreated by E-O3. Results of parameter optimization showed that current and ozone dosage should be carefully adjusted to achieve an economic operation. This study provides a promising AOPs-O3 for treatment of acidic wastewaters.

Keywords: Electrolysis; Ozone; Acetic acid; Efficiency; Acidic wastewater

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