molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Antimicrobial Activity of Plant Volatiles in Vapor Phase"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Fragrances and Flavours".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ladislav Kokoska
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Crop Sciences and Agroforestry, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Prague 6-Suchdol, Czech Republic
Interests: biologically active natural products; phytochemistry; food and agricultural chemistry; ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant volatile agents (PVA) are abundant chemicals that are emitted as an important factor, allowing communication and interaction among plants and their environment. This relatively large group of natural products consisting of lipophilic compounds of low molecular weight and high vapor pressure is divided into several chemical classes, including terpenoids, phenylpropanoids, fatty acids derivatives, and amino acid-derived products in addition to a few specific compounds not represented in those major classes, such as alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and ketones. Essential oils (EOs), aromatic liquids of complex composition, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, terpenoids, and phenylpropanoids are one of the most important representatives of PVA. As they often possess a broad spectrum of biological effects, EOs and their constituents have been widely used in the medicine, perfumery, cosmetic, and food industries since ancient times.

In recent years, the vapors of PVA have been intensively studied for their inhibitory effects against various microorganisms involved in the pathogenesis of human and plant diseases as well as in contamination and deterioration of food and agricultural products. The main advantage of PVA vapors is that they do not need to be applied systemically to the body or directly to the product, and they naturally tend to be regularly distributed in the air conditions of the targeted area. In addition, EOs are a typical example of complex mixtures producing an antimicrobial synergistic effect, which is currently considered as an effective tool for overcoming microbial resistance. Although they are considered relatively safe and environmentally friendly agents, it should be noted that respiratory, allergic, or immune effects associated with inhalation of essential oils and their constituents have been observed, especially in infants and children. Therefore, detailed safety evaluation of novel PVA through appropriate methods is necessary before their introduction to practical use.

The papers in this Special Issue will provide up-to date literature analysis and newly generated experimental data on antimicrobial effectiveness of PVA, including innovative approaches for evaluating their activities in vapor phase. This information should be useful for medicinal, pharmaceutical, food, and agricultural experts working in areas related to the management of infectious diseases (especially respiratory and skin infections), food preservation (e.g., active packaging), and protection of agriculture products (e.g., controlled atmosphere). It may also stimulate the interest of the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, food, and agriculture industries in the research and development of new antibacterial and antifungal agents of natural origin. The issue will therefore appeal to communities of industrial stakeholders, pharmacists, physicians, food experts, agriculturists, and researchers in related areas such as pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, microbiology, natural product chemistry, food preservation, plant protection, etc.

Prof. Dr. Ladislav Kokoska
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antibacterial activity
  • Antifungal activity
  • Anti-infective agents
  • Antimicrobial activity
  • Biological effects
  • Essential oils
  • Food safety
  • Human health
  • Phenylpropanoids
  • Plant protection
  • Plant volatiles
  • Terpenoids
  • Toxicity
  • Vapor phase
  • Volatile compounds
  • Volatile oils

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Chemical Composition and Determination of the Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils in Liquid and Vapor Phases Extracted from Two Different Southeast Asian Herbs—Houttuynia cordata (Saururaceae) and Persicaria odorata (Polygonaceae)
Molecules 2020, 25(10), 2432; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25102432 (registering DOI) - 22 May 2020
Abstract
Essential oils obtained via the hydrodistillation of two Asian herbs (Houttuynia cordata and Persicaria odorata) were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC–FID). Additionally, both the liquid and vapor phase of essential [...] Read more.
Essential oils obtained via the hydrodistillation of two Asian herbs (Houttuynia cordata and Persicaria odorata) were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC–FID). Additionally, both the liquid and vapor phase of essential oil were tested on antimicrobial activity using the broth microdilution volatilization method. Antimicrobial activity was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria—Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Seratia marcescense and Bacillus subtilis. Hydrodistillation produced a yield of 0.34% (Houttuynia cordata) and 0.40% (Persicaria odorata). 41 compounds were identified in both essential oils. Essential oils contained monoterpenes and their oxidized forms, sesquiterpenes and their oxidized forms, oxidized diterpenes, derivates of phenylpropene and other groups, such as, for example, aldehydes, alcohols or fatty acids. Both essential oils were antimicrobial active in both vapor and liquid phases at least in case of one bacterium. They expressed various antimicrobial activity in the range of 128–1024 μg∙mL−1, 512–1024 μg∙mL−1 in broth and 1024 μg∙mL−1, 512–1024 μg∙mL−1 in agar, respectively. Research showed new interesting information about P. odorata and H. cordata essential oils and demonstrated that both essential oils could be possibly used in the field of natural medicine or natural food preservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Activity of Plant Volatiles in Vapor Phase)
Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Mint, Basil, and Lavender Essential Oil Vapor-Phase in Antifungal Protection and Lemon Fruit Quality
Molecules 2020, 25(8), 1831; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081831 - 16 Apr 2020
Abstract
There is an increasing interest in developing natural methods to replace the current chemicals used for maintaining postharvest quality of citrus fruits. The essential oil antifungal activity of mint (MEO), basil (BEO), and lavender (LEO) acting as the vapor-phases was tested against Penicillium [...] Read more.
There is an increasing interest in developing natural methods to replace the current chemicals used for maintaining postharvest quality of citrus fruits. The essential oil antifungal activity of mint (MEO), basil (BEO), and lavender (LEO) acting as the vapor-phases was tested against Penicillium digitatum. The minimum doses with fungistatic and fungicidal effect, in vitro, acting as the vapor-phases, were set up. The minimum fungicidal dose was 300 μL for BEO and 350 μL LEO, while for MEO only minimal dose with fungistatic effect was reached. The IC50 values were calculated and used (v/v) for testing preservation of lemon fruits, in close space enriched in vapor oil. For this purpose, the following two independent in vivo experiments were carried out: experiment 1, inoculated lemons with P. digitatum stored without chemical treatments 7 days, at 22 ± 2 °C, at two concentrations (C1—IC50 equivalent; C2—half of C1); and experiment 2, the non-inoculated lemons kept under the same conditions and concentrations of EO vapor served to evaluate the lemon quality properties. The results showed that antifungal protective effect was provided in the order of LEO-C1 > BEO-C1 > MEO-C1 > BEO-C2 > MEO-C2 > LEO-C2. The quality indicators like weight loss, pH, and firmness were not negatively influenced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Activity of Plant Volatiles in Vapor Phase)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop